Marketing and the Bottom Line: The Marketing Metrics to Pump Up Cash Flow / Edition 2

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Overview

"The subject is critically important and Ambler's ideas are provocative."
Philip Kotler

" Far and away the best book for a senior manager who is interested in understanding marketing's impact on his or her organization."
Journal of Marketing, January 04

Marketing really isn't different, and it really isn't impossible to measure. It¿s an investment. Unless you can measure its impact, you're wasting your money.

Select the right metrics for your company and ensure a regular assessment of marketing by top management in order to keep performance on track. Here, for the first time, is a book that explains the "why" as well as the "what" and the "how" of marketing metrics.

How much attention does your board give to the sources of cash flow? Perhaps what gets measured is not always what gets done but it's a start. This book explains the reasons for regular marketing assessment by the whole board, key marketplace metrics, and assessing the firm's state of innovation health. Improved marketing requires employees to change what they do, and the way that they do it.

Most companies don't have a clear picture of their marketing performance. Now is the time to see what you are doing. Clarity of goals and assessment of performance separate the professional from the amateur; and only the professionals win.

"It is time that marketing stood up and was counted. Literally. This book is the enabler. It's not full of prescriptive rules. Instead it poses questions to ask, suggests possible measurements to make and details experiences from real companies. It does not suffer from consultant speak and is grounded in the reality of the struggle to "make marketing accountable. It is important for the future of marketing."
Market Leader

"A blue print for the marketer to impress his or her boss in how to measure the value of their efforts. Numbers haven't been so much fun for a long time. Buy this book." Brand Republic


"Marketers need to be far more accountable, and this book shows them not just how to provide measures of success but also how to achieve top management consensus about marketing investment. " Ken Bishop, Director of Marketing, IBM UK

"This is a succinct, witty and mould-breaking book on a very important topic. It should be read by all senior managers and marketers." Professor Hugh Davidson, Cranfield School of Management

"This book is a big step forward in assessing marketing impact - an area which is short of regular performance management." Sir John Egan, CBI

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The subject is critically important and Ambler's ideas are provocative."
Philip Kotler

" Far and away the best book for a senior manager who is interested in understanding marketing's impact on his or her organization."
Journal of Marketing , January 04

"It is time that marketing stood up and was counted. Literally. This book is the enabler. It's not full of prescriptive rules. Instead it poses questions to ask, suggests possible measurements to make and details experiences from real companies. It does not suffer from consultant speak and is grounded in the reality of the struggle to "make marketing accountable. It is important for the future of marketing." Market Leader

"Marketers need to be far more accountable, and this book shows them not just how to provide measures of success but also how to achieve top management consensus about marketing investment. " Ken Bishop, Director of Marketing, IBM UK

"This is a succinct, witty and mould-breaking book on a very important topic. It should be read by all senior managers and marketers." Professor Hugh Davidson, Cranfield School of Management

"This book is a big step forward in assessing marketing impact - an area which is short of regular performance management." Sir John Egan, CBI

"Although Ambler's 'Marketing and the Bottom Line' may sound like a core text book that should be read by every undergraduate marketing student, its strength goes well beyond the bounds of academic study. To begin with, it's a really easy book to read. And although it's about the numbers that preoccupy the CFO and CEO, Ambler has demystified what could have been an impenetrable subject.

What struck me about this book is that it's written by a marketer for marketers. The central tenant of the book is that most brand owners aren't making marketing accountable in a way that is relevant and meaningful. But it doesn't stop there and through some original research Ambler provides a blue print for the marketer to impress his or her boss in how to measure the value of their efforts. Numbers haven't been so much fun for a long time. Buy this book."
Brand Republic

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780273661948
  • Publisher: FT Press
  • Publication date: 3/30/2004
  • Series: Financial Times Series
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

TIM AMBLER

Tim Ambler joined London Business School in 1991 and is aSenior Fellow. His research includes the measurement of marketing performanceand brand equity ('Marketing Metrics'), advertising and promotionseffectiveness, marketing in China and overseas market entry. Apart from theprivate sector, he researches government waste arising from bureaucracy andregulation.

He has published an introductory text, Marketing fromAdvertising to Zen, in the Financial Times Guide series, Doingbusiness with China (with Morgan Witzel), and, also published by FinancialTimes Prentice Hall, The Silk Road to International Marketing (withChris Styles). Recent papers include how advertising works, co-authored withDemetrios Vakratsas, in the Journal of Marketing; with Kent Grayson,advertising agency - client relationships in the Journal of MarketingResearch; and, with Chris Styles and Wang Xiucun, channel relationships inChina in the International Journal of Research in Marketing. He hasalso published in the Journal of Service Research, Journal of MarketingManagement, International Journal of Advertising, Asia Pacific Journal ofManagement, and the Financial Times.

Tim Ambler was previously Joint Managing Director ofInternational Distillers and Vintners (IDV - now part of Diageo), responsiblefor strategy, acquisitions and marketing. He holds Master's degrees inMathematics from Oxford and Business from the Sloan School (M.I.T). Afterqualifying as a Chartered Accountant with Peat Marwick andMitchell (now KPMG), it took him 5 years to discover that keepingscore was a lot less fun than marketing. The same proved to be truefor general management and he is grateful to London Business School forproviding the freedom to rediscover what marketing is all about.

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Table of Contents

1: Is Your Metrics System Good Enough?
2: Brand Equity Is An Elephant
3: The Dangers Of Reliance On Shareholder Value And Other Financial Metrics
4: Metrics Evolution: How Did We Get Where We Are? 5: A Practical Methodolgy For Selecting The Right External Metrics
6: Using Metrics To Improve Innovation Performance
7: Employee Brand Equity
8: Monitoring Other Stakeholders' Brand Equity
9: Assessing The Performance Of The Mix
10: Getting The Right Metrics To The Top Table
11: The Fuzzy Future

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2004

    insightful!

    This is a marketing book unlike any other marketing book. It is really written for financial officers. In fact, at one point, author Tim Ambler actually recommends turning responsibility for marketing metrics over to the finance department. That emphasis on a hard-nosed, bottom line orientation is novel and refreshing. Ambler recognizes that one of the biggest problems marketers inflict on themselves is their failure to establish and demonstrate that money spent on marketing really does matter to the financial performance of a business. With comprehensive attention to detail, he is careful to present most of the current thinking on how to measure the value of investments in marketing. Unfortunately, his style is dense, so much of what he says may take non-experts several readings to clarify.We are grateful that his helpful executive summary goes some way toward mitigating this problem and highly recommends his comprehensive and informative material ¿ however, an editor as ruthless as a CFO might benefit the book¿s own bottom line.

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