The Marketing of the President: Political Marketing as Campaign Strategy

Overview

Winning a presidential election is like operating a successful business. The best and most successful businesses are customer driven. The Marketing of the President documents how political candidates are marketed by the same sophisticated techniques that experts use to sell legal and medical services. Newman addresses issues of serious concern to the health of the political process as he examines the roles of positioning, polling, direct mail, 900 numbers, and television in advertising. Using the 1992 ...
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Overview

Winning a presidential election is like operating a successful business. The best and most successful businesses are customer driven. The Marketing of the President documents how political candidates are marketed by the same sophisticated techniques that experts use to sell legal and medical services. Newman addresses issues of serious concern to the health of the political process as he examines the roles of positioning, polling, direct mail, 900 numbers, and television in advertising. Using the 1992 presidential election as a case study, this extraordinary volume reveals how the American political process has been transformed - for better or worse - by the use of marketing techniques. The Marketing of the President important reading for marketing professionals and students interested in nonprofit applications of marketing concepts, or for political scientists and policymakers who are concerned about the increasing role of marketing in political campaigns.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Using the 1992 presidential election as a case study, Newman (Kellstadt Graduate School of Business, DePaul U.) explores how modern marketing techniques used in the "commercial marketplace" have been successfully adapted to the "political marketplace," how the American presidential electoral process has been transformed by marketing, who now controls the electoral process, and what impact this has had on elections in this country. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803951372
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 12/20/1993
  • Pages: 164

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Foreword
Preface
Pt. I The Evolution of Marketing in Politics 1
1 The New Political Campaign Technology 5
So What Is Marketing? 8
A Model of Political Marketing 11
A Shift in Power From Party Bosses to Consultants 15
The Role of Negative Advertising 15
A Historical Perspective on the Merging of Marketing and Politics 17
Marketing and the 1992 Presidential Election 20
2 The Shifting Winds of Politics 24
The Candidates Are Going Direct to the Voter 26
The High Costs of Running for President 26
An Older, Fragmented, and More Informed Electorate 27
Old Methods and Tactics Are Not Working 28
The Decline of Party Loyalty 29
The Powerful Press 30
Today's Press Is More Educated and Experienced 30
A Brief Description and Evolution of the Marketing Concept 31
Are the Best Possible Candidates Running for Office? 34
The Party Concept Versus the Marketing Concept 35
3 The Powers That Be 42
Technology 44
Structural Shifts 47
The Power Brokers 52
Pt. II The Marketing Campaign 63
4 Voter Segmentation 67
A Comparison of Voter Needs and Consumer Needs 69
A Model of Voter Behavior 70
The Market Segmentation Strategies of Bush, Clinton, and Perot 75
5 Candidate Positioning 86
Assessing the Candidate's Strengths and Weaknesses 88
Assessing Competition 89
Targeting Segments 90
Establishing Image 91
The Candidate-Positioning Strategies of Bush, Clinton, and Perot 92
6 Strategy Formulation and Implementation 103
The Marketing Strategies of Bush, Clinton, and Perot 105
The Strategic Plan 120
Pt. III The Future of Political Marketing 133
7 Dial-In Democracy 135
The Changes in 1992 137
Implications for 1996 143
References 152
Author Index 154
Subject Index 156
About the Author 165
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