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Markets in Motion / Edition 1
     

Markets in Motion / Edition 1

4.0 1
by Ned Davis
 

ISBN-10: 0471732818

ISBN-13: 9780471732815

Pub. Date: 04/22/2005

Publisher: Wiley

Markets in Motion is a graphical overview of the economic conditions and events that have influenced the U.S. stock market since 1900. Decade by decade, you'll examine how different economic and policitcal environments can be directly correlated to stock market movements. Each decade features graphs displaying the performance of the Dow Jones Average, the

Overview

Markets in Motion is a graphical overview of the economic conditions and events that have influenced the U.S. stock market since 1900. Decade by decade, you'll examine how different economic and policitcal environments can be directly correlated to stock market movements. Each decade features graphs displaying the performance of the Dow Jones Average, the Dow Jones price to dividend ratio, industrial production, money supply, consumer price index, T bill rate, and the Discount rate. Embedded on the graphs are short descriptions of important political, economic, and historical events. Use this information to reference similar environments today and gain an edge in determining the future direction of the market.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471732815
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/22/2005
Edition description:
25th Anniversary Edition
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
17.10(w) x 11.80(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

1. 1900-1909 "America, the Envy of the World" (Communication, Transportation, Immigration).

2. 1910-1919 "The War to End All Wars" (World War I, Worldwide Revolution, and a New Banking System).

3. 1920-1929 "The Roaring Twenties" (Pent-Up Demand, Post-World War I).

4. 1930-1939 "The Great Depression" (U.S. Government Expands its Control, The World Readies for War Again).

5. 1940-1949 "War and Prosperity Again" (WW II, and its Aftermath the World Rebuilds).

6. 1950-1959 "I Like Ike" (Consumer Boom, McCarthyism, Korean War).

7. 1960-1969 "A New Frontier" and a " Great Society" (A Decade of Economic Expansion).

8. 1970-1979 "America Held Hostage to Stagflation" (Watergate, Petrodollars, America Loses its Pride).

9. 1980-1989 "Reaganomics–The Rise and Fall of Stock Prices (and Yuppies)" (Merger Mania, Rising Debt, Falling Taxes).

10. 1990-1999 A "New Paradigm" (A Megabull Decade and the Rise of the Internal).

11. 2000-2004 "A New Century Begins" (Tech Stock Speculation, Terrorism).

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Markets in Motion 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
market_timer More than 1 year ago
This is an oversized booklet (12 by 18 inches) consisting of graphs of the DJIA and other data on a decade by decade basis. There is a spiral binding inside the hard cover along the long dimension that allows the graphs to lay flat when viewed. Each decade is represented by an upper page and a lower page.

The upper page shows the DJIA and its 200 DMA on a log scale. Below that on the same graph is the price to dividend ratio, and graphics showing bear/bull markets, economic recession/expansion, and the US president. Alternating years are shaded grey, and there are 1 to 4 text snippets in each yearly column that describe important political and economic events (It was this info that I bought the book for).

The lower page has graphs showing the rate of change in industrial production, the consumer price index and M2 money supply, and various interest rate indicators (most recently the T-bill rate and the Discount rate). The lower page also has the yearly shading and text snippets.

The book presents a lot of data, but doesn't really summarize it very well. I would have preferred fewer text snippets in lieu of larger text boxes summarizing the bull and bear markets, and the reasons behind the major price moves. It would have also been nice to have tables of some of the monthly data in the back of the book--this info is available elsewhere, but it takes a lot of leg work to track it all down. And the Dow 30 is the only index presented--others would have been nice, along with other indicators for the lower graphs. But perhaps I am picking nits here--there is a lot of very useful info in this book, and the graphical format has definite advantages over text-based historical summaries.