Marsbound (Marsbound Series #1)

Marsbound (Marsbound Series #1)

3.8 24
by Joe Haldeman
     
 

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Young Carmen Dula and her family are embarking on the adventure of a lifetime-they're going to Mars. But Carmen's rebellious streak leads her to venture out into the bleak Mars landscape alone, where she is saved by an angel. An angel with too many arms and legs, a head that looks like a potato gone bad-and a message for the humans on Mars: We were here

Overview

Young Carmen Dula and her family are embarking on the adventure of a lifetime-they're going to Mars. But Carmen's rebellious streak leads her to venture out into the bleak Mars landscape alone, where she is saved by an angel. An angel with too many arms and legs, a head that looks like a potato gone bad-and a message for the humans on Mars: We were here first...

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Intriguing...a thought-provoking meditation on time, history, and the potential for human evolution."
-BOOKPAGE

"Recalling Robert A. Heinlein's Red Planet and Podkayne of Mars, Haldeman updates the Martian setting."
-PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"Classic sci-fi to be savored."
-MONSTERS AND CRITICS

Stephen King
If there was a Fort Knox for the science fiction writers who really matter, we'd have to lock Haldeman up there.
Publishers Weekly

Hugo and Nebula-winner Haldeman infuses this yarn with his teen narrator's intelligent curiosity. Carmen Dula, part of the first human colony on Mars, looks like a typical young adult heroine: distanced from her parents, irritated by her bratty younger sibling and beset by tyrannical colony administrator Dargo Solingen. Then she accidentally discovers real Martians living in an underground city and has to convince Solingen that her story is true. When the Martians reveal a terrible threat to life on Earth, it's up to Carmen and her friends to save the day. Recalling Robert A. Heinlein's Red Planet and Podkayne of Mars, Haldeman updates the Martian setting while keeping faith in his characters' ability to respond to unexpected challenges. (Aug.)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780441017393
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/28/2009
Series:
A Marsbound Novel Series, #1
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
544,875
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Intriguing...a thought-provoking meditation on time, history, and the potential for human evolution."
-BOOKPAGE

"Recalling Robert A. Heinlein's Red Planet and Podkayne of Mars, Haldeman updates the Martian setting."
-PUBLISHERS WEEKLY

"Classic sci-fi to be savored."
-MONSTERS AND CRITICS

Meet the Author

Joe Haldeman is a Vietnam veteran whose classic novels The Forever War and Forever Peace both have the rare honor of winning the Hugo and Nebula Awards. He has served twice as president of the Science Fiction Writers of America and is currently an adjunct professor teaching writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Marsbound 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
MichaelTravisJasper More than 1 year ago
This book is the first of a trilogy. I have enjoyed Mr. Haldeman’s books in the past, and was not disappointed with this one. It is the story of mankind beginning to explore and colonize Mars. In the process, we make “first contact” with alien life forms. The story is told from the point of view of a teenage girl. Her character develops in a realistic way, and her adventure is fun to follow. As is often the case with good science fiction, the ideas presented are fascinating and incredible to consider. I have just begun the second volume, and look forward to reading it and the last in the series. Michael Travis Jasper, Author of the Novel “To Be Chosen”
harstan More than 1 year ago
Carmen Dula could just as easily be growing up on earth with her teen angst. She avoids her parents like they are the plague or when she feels kind towards them she treats them like they are just stupid and her younger pain in the butt sibling drives her to want to run away. However, as a lottery pick family sent to live on the first human colony on Mars she knows there are not a lot places for a runaway to go to especially with the great dictator colony manager Dargo Solingen looking over everyone¿s shoulder.---------------- During one of her forays away from her family, Carmen finds previously undetected Martians living in an underground city in the bleak ¿wilderness¿. She tries unsuccessfully to convince Solingen what she found, but he writes her off as teenage mutant with no brains inside her head. When she and her friends learn what the Martians plan for the colonists, Carmen and company know not to waste any time with the manager they make the effort to save the earthlings.--------------- This is an engaging coming of age Martian thriller due to Carmen who tells the story with a combination of young adult intelligence and teenage impatient angst at the stupidity of adults. The story line is action-packed though told mostly by Carmen as she learns first hand personal agendas as she deals with officious oppressors (parents and government are included), the enemy who wants her dead, and her guardian angel who she does not what Mr. Potatohead wants from her.----------- Harriet Klausner
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OldmanCB More than 1 year ago
Reminiscent of early Heinlein, IE Podkayne of Mars. Dialogue driven, much as works from Heinlein, John D. MacDonald, Robert B. Parker and Alan Dean Foster.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a terrific read, challenging, engaging, and satisfying all through, with a good conclusion. Highly recommend. However, I cannot say the same for the next two in the series, "Starbound" and "Earthbound." They felt too much like movie sequels, laid onto a successful initial story for franchise profit reasons. Hey, everybody has to make a living, but the two sequels get progressively worse and unsatisfying. The last is abysmal, just ending in what indicates that the author just got tired of the whole enterprise. I recommend that you not waste your time with either. While the second is okay - although so much more could have been done with it - it doesn't conclude so much as literally walk into the third. Stick with this one, and treat it as a standalone, as which it functions quite well.
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Wonderweirdo22 More than 1 year ago
I bought this book after reading some very strong reviews of it, but it wasn't any good after I had read it. I's supposed to be a character driven story about human contact with alien life. I think it was overhyped by the reviews to boost sales.