Marshall County, Kentucky (Images of America Series)

Overview


In the early 19th century, settlers established ferries across the Tennessee River in Kentucky and grew crops, including corn and tobacco. Small communities formed around schools and crossroads. Cheap land prices and lust for westward expansion fueled population growth. In 1842, Marshall County was created and named for Chief Justice John Marshall. Over the next 100 years, some roadside communities grew into small, prosperous towns. James Love founded Birmingham, a port on the Tennessee River, which became the ...
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Overview


In the early 19th century, settlers established ferries across the Tennessee River in Kentucky and grew crops, including corn and tobacco. Small communities formed around schools and crossroads. Cheap land prices and lust for westward expansion fueled population growth. In 1842, Marshall County was created and named for Chief Justice John Marshall. Over the next 100 years, some roadside communities grew into small, prosperous towns. James Love founded Birmingham, a port on the Tennessee River, which became the county's largest community. Downriver Gilbertsville profited from river traffic and rail transportation, while Hardin and Calvert City developed strictly around rail stops. Benton slowly matured as the county seat. Still the county was mostly rural farming communities until the devastating flood of 1937 brought the Tennessee Valley Authority to Gilbertsville to build Kentucky Dam.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780738542843
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing SC
  • Publication date: 8/28/2006
  • Series: Images of America Series
  • Pages: 127
  • Product dimensions: 6.54 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author


The desire to learn about her family's ancestral home brought historian Connie M. Huddleston to team with her mother, Carol Aldridge, and friend Virginia Smith to explore Marshall County in this pictorial legacy. Connie M. Huddleston is a historic preservation consultant in Marietta, Georgia, and owns Interpreting Time's Past, LLC. Carol Aldridge, born in Gilbertsville, returned to Marshall County several years ago and enjoys living on Kentucky Lake. County native Virginia Smith works with the Marshall County Genealogical and Historical Society.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2006

    A photo album of rural life

    Don¿t let its small size fool you- this little gem of a book has something for everyone. If you are a serious student of Kentucky history you will delight in the insights offered in each of the books chapters. The authors shed light ¿ accented through the sepia tones of the book¿s rich collection of historic photographs- into the people and places that shaped Marshall County. They stays away from trite generalizations about the county and its residents as microcosms of a larger America, but there are similarities between the Kentucky life they illuminate and the background of just about every rural county in America. For everyone else, Marshall County offers a trip into the past and engenders a nostalgic yearning to pull out the old shoeboxes filled with our own family photos. Page after page tells the story of pioneer families turned rural industrialists. The story of Marshall County becomes not so much about towns and regions but about the families, the ¿odd characters¿, and the fascinating people who gave the county its rich character. This book represents the family photo album of an entire county, shared with pride. Take an afternoon and curl up with Marshall County. You¿ll come away feeling as if you¿ve discovered a lost branch of your family tree.

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