Marshfield Dreams: When I Was a Kid [NOOK Book]

Overview



The colorful boyhood of a popular author comes to life in this personal account

Imagine learning from a nosy classmate that your mother is having yet another baby. To Ralph’s classmates, news of one more Fletcher baby is just “scuttlebutt.” But for Ralph, the oldest of nine, being part of a large family means more kids to join in the fun—from making tripods in the woods and “snicking” up the rug, to raising chicks and even discovering a ...
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Marshfield Dreams: When I Was a Kid

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Overview



The colorful boyhood of a popular author comes to life in this personal account

Imagine learning from a nosy classmate that your mother is having yet another baby. To Ralph’s classmates, news of one more Fletcher baby is just “scuttlebutt.” But for Ralph, the oldest of nine, being part of a large family means more kids to join in the fun—from making tripods in the woods and “snicking” up the rug, to raising chicks and even discovering a meteor (well, maybe). It doesn’t feel like there’s life beyond Marshfield, Massachusetts. Then one day Dad’s new job moves the family to Chicago, and there’s so much Ralph has to leave behind. In this humorous and captivating memoir, Ralph Fletcher traces the roots of his storytelling.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Young readers who aspire to become authors will find inspiration in this charming little book. With its emphasis on looking closely at the details of one's own world, it encourages children to see the wonder in everyday things. The inference is clear—you do not need to grow up with wizards and dragons to have an interesting life. Conversely, young readers who thrive on action and adventure will find this slow going. Like many memoirs, the book lacks a clear narrative structure. And while the short chapters each create interesting vignettes, they do not build upon each other. Consequently, the book does not have the kind of tension and direction that will keep a reluctant reader engaged. All in all, with its gentle evocation of a time gone by, this book may have been more successful if aimed at adults, rather than at children. 2005, Henry Holt and Co, Ages 9 to 12.
—Barbara Carroll Roberts
VOYA
In short, charming essays, Fletcher, author of Writing Kind of Day: Poems for Young Poets (Wordsong/Boyds Mills, 2005/VOYA June 2005) and Room Enough for Love (Aladdin/S & S, 1998/VOYA August 1998), describes his life from birth to his thirteenth year in Marshfield, Massachusetts, where as the oldest of nine children in a traditional Catholic family, he gathered the experiences that inspire his writing about family, nature, and language. About separate but related experiences, the essays can be read individually or as a whole. He describes his close relationship with his nature-loving brother, Jimmy; his special respect for his father, who gave him the pen that kindled his desire to write; his mother's loving nature and work ethic; and a brief encounter about teeth and family tradition with his great-grandmother. His most humorous essays involve a gossipy classmate and the chickens that prove to be roosters. The most serious reflections concern his relationship with his father and the realization that at thirteen, he must leave his home and three closest friends forever. Fletcher fans will love hearing about their favorite author's early life. These sensitive glimpses of a close-knit, traditional family offer great read-aloud material and models for essay writing. The introductory map of Fletcher's childhood world and the family photos introducing each chapter present inviting ideas for student autobiography. Some senior high students and adults may enjoy this nostalgic Russell Baker-type approach, but middle and junior high students will probably be the main audience. VOYA CODES: 5Q 3P M J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, definedas grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2005, Henry Holt, 192p.; Photos. Map., Ages 11 to 18.
—Lucy Schall
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Fletcher reminisces about growing up in Marshfield, VT, recalling boyhood friendships, sibling attachments, and romps through the woods. "We found all kinds of mushrooms. Some were edible, others were poisonous toadstools. Mom said to think of them as strangers-some are good, some are bad, and since you couldn't tell the difference it was best to leave them alone." Fletcher grew up in a Catholic family that grew larger each year, and when another baby was on the way, he'd learn the news from a girl in his class. Family and friendships were fulfilling, enriching, and perplexing. The author thinks about the loss of Dad's goodnight kisses as he grew up, and the adolescent predicament of being pressed between a girl's body and a wall that housed a giant beehive. Fletcher's connection to nature and the environment infuse every aspect of his life. Written with sagacious eloquence and gentle humor, this work stands strong in the ranks of authors' memoirs and autobiographies.-Alison Follos, North Country School, Lake Placid, NY Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Fletcher joins a select group of children's authors who open the pages to their childhood and the circumstances that led to their literary lives. "My world on Acorn Street (Marshfield, Mass.) seemed perfect, complete. But things began to happen that made me aware of another, bigger world." Not much is secret in Ralph's small town, so it's embarrassing when a classmate tells him the scuttlebutt is that his mom is having yet another baby. Ralph's mother has a baby every year, making him the oldest of nine, but who wants to hear that news from some nosy girl. A black-and-white photo of family members pertinent to the episode heads each chapter as Ralph relates "snicking" up the rug, raising chicks, playing war and sharing germs. This scrapbook of family moments is an amusing, charming and heartwarming memoir about a close family-close in terms of both small house space and their feelings for each other. A snapshot of small-world life that will open readers' eyes to the bonds of a peerless time and simpler lifestyle. (Autobiography. 8-12)
From the Publisher
“Written with sagacious eloquence and gentle humor, this work stands strong in the ranks of authors’ memoirs and autobiographies.” —School Library Journal

“Boisterously good times . . . For readers who enjoy imagining what it was like to be a kid in days of yore, this has a certain charm.” —Booklist

“Charming . . . Sensitive glimpses of a close-knit, traditional family.” —VOYA

“This scrapbook of family moments is an amusing, charming and heartwarming memoir about a close family—close in terms of both small house space and their feelings for each other. A snapshot of small-world life that will open readers’ eyes to the bonds of a peerless time and simpler lifestyle.” —Kirkus Reviews

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429998185
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 9/1/2005
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 301,475
  • Age range: 10 - 15 Years
  • File size: 632 KB

Meet the Author

Ralph Fletcher is the author of a wide range of books for young readers from picture books through novels. He also teaches workshops on poetry and writing. Mr. Fletcher lives with his family in Lee, New Hampshire.

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Read an Excerpt


Marshfield Dreams

Marshfield

THERE’S A TOWN called Marshfield in the state of Vermont. You can also find a Marshfield in Maine, one in Missouri,and one in Wisconsin. I grew up in Marshfield,Massachusetts. The curly part of Massachusetts that sticks out into the ocean is Cape Cod. Marshfield sits on the ocean,just above that curl.

I lived on Acorn Street in a regular house bordered by forest on two sides. Dad owned seven acres of woods in back. Across a dirt driveway we had Ale’s Woods,a forest of pine trees. The pines dropped millions of needles,which gave the forest floor a nice,springy feel. Those trees were great for climbing. If I crawled out too far on a limb and fell,the soft needles cushioned my fall,so I never got hurt.

The woods held magical things. We found snake skins,real Indian arrowheads,box turtles, beehives,snake spit on tall grass. We dug up the buried trash from people who lived there many years before. We saw gravestones so old we could no longer read the names carved in them. We found all kinds of mushrooms. Some were edible, and others were poisonous toadstools. Mom said to think of them as strangers—some are good, some are bad,and since you couldn’t tell the difference it was best to leave them alone. One morning in the woods I stepped into a fairy ring of mushrooms,a big circle ten feet across.

There was a tiny stream in our backyard small enough so you could step from one bank to theother. This stream flowed under the dirt driveway and formed a swamp at the edge of Ale’s Woods. I loved the dank smell of that swamp and all the things that lived there: mossy logs and goggle-eyed frogs,bloodsuckers and eels and foul-smelling skunk cabbage. Half the swamp was underwater,and the other half contained thick, dense mud. It was impossible to walk through that muck without getting stuck. More than once I tried and left behind one of my sneakers,a lost sole sunk forever at the bottom of the swamp. I got in trouble for that. But today I’m glad to know that something of mine was left behind in Marsh-field.

Here is my story.

Junior

AS THE OLDEST of nine,I was named after my father and my grandfather. Some kids on Acorn Street teased me,calling: "Hey,Juuuu-nioooor!" not that I minded. I liked having the same name as my father,but it did cause confusion in the house.

Whenever Mom called out,"Ralph!" Dad and I would both answer,"Yeah?"

"No,Big Ralph!" or, "Little Ralph!" she yelled back,to clarify things. I guess that would have annoyed some people,but it didn’t really bother me. Dad was tall and handsome. I bragged to my friends that my father was so cool he had three jobs: teacher,milkman,bartender. I was proud of him. I loved knowing that Ralph could fit us both in one snug syllable.

Statue

BY THE TIME I was three I already had a brother, Jimmy,who was a year younger than me. My sister Elaine was a year younger than Jim. Dad worked as a traveling book salesman,and Mom took care of us when Dad was away. Dad came home on Friday nights. On Saturdays,after breakfast,the whole family would play outside.

As soon as I saw Mom and Dad coming out the door,I’d get excited and run to the big boulder in the front yard. We were about to play my favorite game,Statue. I arranged my body in a certain pose and froze. Then I closed my eyes,waiting. My heart beat faster as they came closer.

"What’s this?" Dad asked.

"It looks like a statue!" Mom said. She had Jimmy and Lainie in the stroller and pushed them closer.

"A statue of a little boy!" Dad exclaimed. "It’s beautiful! It’s absolutely perfect! Amazing!"

Mom knelt to touch my nose. I could feel the eyes of my whole family studying me closely. Jimmy laughed. The baby just stared.

"A little boy carved in stone!" Mom exclaimed. "You think we could buy it?"

"Hey look!" Dad said. "There’s a price tag right here on the sleeve!"

I remained absolutely still,barely breathing, while Dad examined the invisible tag.

"How much?" Mom asked impatiently. "How much is it?"

"It’s a lot—one hundred dollars!" Dad told her. "But who cares? It’s worth every penny! I’d pay five hundred dollars for a statue like this! I’d pay a thousand!"

I tried hard not to smile.

"Excuse me,madam," Dad said to baby Lainie. "Is this your store? My wife and I would like to buy this statue here. A hundred dollars? Certainly. Here you go. Ten,twenty thirty forty fifty sixty seventy eighty ninety one hundred. What? Ship it? No,no thank you. We’ll just put it in our car and drive it home."

He handed Lainie to Mom and picked me up. With me in his lap,stiff as a board,he sat on the boulder. Mom sat beside him. Dad pretended to turn on the car ignition.

"Drive carefully," Mom said. "We don’t want the statue to get damaged."

"Don’t worry," Dad replied, while turning the steering wheel. He pretended to park the car. "Here we are."

"Where should we put the statue?" Mom asked.

"I’ve got the perfect place for it," he said. "Right here in our front yard."

"How wonderful," Mom exclaimed. "We’ve got two boys,but I’ve always wanted another."

"Look at the detail on the face." Dad bent down to examine me closely. "It almost looks alive!"

That was my cue. Slowly,I lifted my chin and looked up,first at my father,then at my mother.

"My goodness!" they shouted. "He’s alive!"

Hugs! Kisses!

"It’s a real boy!" Dad exclaimed. "Would you like to live with us?"

Shyly,I nodded. With more hugs and kisses, they welcomed me into the family.

"It’s a miracle," Dad kept saying. "An absolute miracle."

Excerpted from Marshfield dreams by Ralph Fletcher.
Copyright © 2005 by Ralph Fletcher.
Published in First edition-2005 by Henry Holt and Company.
All rights reserved. This work is protected under copyright laws and reproduction is strictly prohibited. Permission to reproduce the material in any manner or medium must be secured from the Publisher.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2009

    Mrs. B's fourth graders say "We loved this book!"

    I read this book out loud to my 4th grade students and had tons of laughs! Their favorite chapter was "Michele with one L". They made me read it over and over, even after we were finished.
    The book was great for teaching point of view, characterization, and text to self connections. We were learning something new about being a writer in every chapter.
    We felt like Ralph was one of our classmates and we were on the adventure with him in Marshfield, all the way from Texas!
    isThay asWay an wesomeAy ookBay!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2012

    Awesome

    A really good book! Its really funny! :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2014

    Fabulous Book for Memoir Unit in 4th grade

    This is a delightful, easy read about the author's life when he was young. I will be using this for a common core unit on memoirs with my 4th graders. They will love the stories and be able to ask great questions about the past.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2014

    4 stars

    I love this book its like a childhood book i wish they can make a chigao dreams i love this book. Most book are good but this one was great i cant wait to share more book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    AMAZING

    Really a good book we read in school. Ralph came to talk a few years ago. Of course its not the year im in 6th grade!! Anyways, i absolutely love the book. And i have the same name as his sister oohh

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2013

    From Perincess

    I am 2 pages in to the book and I like it.I totolly recomend you buy this book if you are having truble getting it or not!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

    Dragon

    It was a awsone book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Great

    I loved the book he does a great job writing it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    Best book for all ages

    Best book ever ever ever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Awesomw Awesome

    Hilarous

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2007

    Reminds me of my own Marshfield childhood!

    I grew up in Marshfield, MA during the 70's and had many of the same outdoor experiences that Ralph captured in his book (even though I am a girl and of a new generation- I could still relate). This is a quick and easy read that takes you on a wonderful journey of a happy childhood celebrating family, local history, and the natural landscape and residents of a small coastal town. Marshfield has become developed much since the 70's of my childhood but it was nice to be reminded of all the wonders and joy of growing up in a wooded wonderland (pre-sub-division craziness). I wish town planners would read this book! Overall, this story will leave you with a warm feeling and a smile on your face.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2005

    Childhoos Magic

    The stories are charming and magical and evoke the array of emotions we experience in childhood. I loved the map of the neighborhood!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2012

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