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Marston Moor 1644: The Beginning of the End (Praeger Illustrated Military History Series)
     

Marston Moor 1644: The Beginning of the End (Praeger Illustrated Military History Series)

by John Tincey
 

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The entry of the Scots into the English Civil War on 19 January 1644 on the side of Parliament radically changed the balance of power in the North of England. The Royalists in the North were forced onto the defensive and besieged in York. In a bold march Prince Rupert outmanoeuvred his enemies and relieved York without a shot being fired. However, when Rupert met

Overview

The entry of the Scots into the English Civil War on 19 January 1644 on the side of Parliament radically changed the balance of power in the North of England. The Royalists in the North were forced onto the defensive and besieged in York. In a bold march Prince Rupert outmanoeuvred his enemies and relieved York without a shot being fired. However, when Rupert met the allied army in battle on Marston Moor on 2 July his cavalry was defeated by Cromwell's Ironsides who then turned on the Royalist infantry. The result was a hard-fought but catastrophic defeat; the Royalist army was crushed and their forces driven from the north of England.

The entry into the English Civil War of the Scots on the side of Parliament radically changed the balance of power in the North of England. The Royalists were forced onto the defensive and the Marquis of Newcastle found his army besieged in York. Prince Rupert proposed a bold plan to relieve York. With cavalry from the King's army he would seize lightly defended Lancashire, a county sympathetic to the Royalist cause, raise a new force, relieve York and unite with the Marquis of Newcastle. He executed his plan with spectacular success and, as the Parliamentarian and Scots armies marched out to meet him outside York, he skilfully marched around their flank and entered York unopposed. Rupert could now have re-supplied the garrison and marched south to rejoin the King. Unfortunately, having received what appeared to be a direct Royal command to fight at any odds, Rupert decided to march out to attack his enemies. Delayed in attacking by Newcastle's slowness, Rupert was forced to watch on 2 July as his enemies formed up on the ridge in front of him. Rupert decided to await the new day before mounting his attack, but it became clear that the Allied armies were advancing. After a desperately hard-fought battle the Royalist army broke. The Parliamentarian and Scots armies wasted their hard won victory and allowed the king to keep the war going, but the loss of the North had decisively tilted the balance of military power in favour of Parliament.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780275988654
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
09/28/2005
Series:
Praeger Illustrated Military History Series
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

JOHN TINCEY is the author of Elite 15: The Armada Campaign 1588, Elite 27: Soldiers of the English Civil War (2) Cavalry and Men-at-Arms 267: The British Army 1660-1704. He has also published works on the battle of Sedgemoor and edited the drill book The Young Horse-man by John Vernon. His TV and video appearances include documentaries on the Armada, Borodino and Waterloo.

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