The Martian Tales Trilogy: A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, and The Warlord of Mars (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) [NOOK Book]

Overview


When it rains in a Burroughs novel, the reader gets wet." -- Science-fiction writer Jack McDevitt

Combining otherworldly adventures with elements of classical myth, fast-paced plots with cliffhanging tension, and imaginative fantasy with vivid prose, Edgar Rice Burroughs' The Martian Tales Trilogy helped define a new literary genre emerging in the early twentieth century ...
See more details below
The Martian Tales Trilogy: A Princess of Mars, The Gods of Mars, and The Warlord of Mars (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$3.99
BN.com price

Overview


When it rains in a Burroughs novel, the reader gets wet." -- Science-fiction writer Jack McDevitt

Combining otherworldly adventures with elements of classical myth, fast-paced plots with cliffhanging tension, and imaginative fantasy with vivid prose, Edgar Rice Burroughs' The Martian Tales Trilogy helped define a new literary genre emerging in the early twentieth century that would become known as science fiction.

Hero John Carter proves himself against deadly foes in The Martian Trilogy. In the first installment, Carter wins the affections of the "princess of Mars" and the respect of the Martian warlords whom he befriends. The excitement continues in The Gods of Mars when Carter engages the Black Pirates in airborne combat above the dead seas of Mars and leads a revolt to free the Martian races from a religion that thrives on living sacrifices. In the third book, Warlord of Mars, Carter overcomes the forces of evil that would destroy the planet. By the end of the trilogy the Martians all clamor for a triumphant John Carter to be their king.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


Born in Chicago, Illinois, on September 1, 1875, Edgar Rice Burroughs grew to maturity during the height of the Industrial Revolution and witnessed the emergence of the United States as a twentieth-century world power. Hailing from a well-to-do family, Burroughs was given an aristocratic education steeped in Latin and Greek, but he was drawn more to an itinerant life of adventure than to a life in the boardroom. The author of Tarzan of the Apes (1912), Burroughs did not confine himself to a single genre; he also wrote medieval romances (The Outlaw of Torn, 1914), westerns (The War Chief of the Apaches, 1927), and mainstream novels (The Girl from Hollywood, 1922).
Read More Show Less

Introduction

Combining otherworldly adventures with elements of classical myth, fast-paced plots with cliffhanging tension, and imaginative fantasy with vivid prose, Edgar Rice Burroughs' The Martian Tales Trilogy (A Princess of Mars [1912], The Gods of Mars [1913], and The Warlord of Mars [1914]) helped define a new literary genre emerging in the early twentieth century that would become known as science fiction. A Princess of Mars, which was originally published in installments in Argosy Magazine in 1912, launched Burroughs' illustrious writing career with its thrilling story of John Carter's adventures on Mars. This popular novel appeared in print only a year before Burroughs wrote the Tarzan epic that would catapult him to international fame.

Edgar Rice Burroughs had been a failure at practically everything he tried before he picked up the pen and started writing. Born in Chicago, Illinois, on September 1, 1875, Burroughs grew to maturity during the height of the Industrial Revolution and witnessed the emergence of the United States as a twentieth-century world power. Hailing from a well-to-do family, Burroughs was given an aristocratic education steeped in Latin and Greek, but he was drawn more to an itinerant life of adventure than to the desk or the boardroom. While his own life was marked by a series of frustrated business endeavors and unrealized dreams of military distinction, Burroughs filled his books with the sorts of adventures he fantasized about-journeys to distant planets, expeditions to the center of the earth, romances in the hidden frontiers of Africa.

By the time he turned to writing in his late thirties, Burroughs had beena soldier in Arizona, a mining speculator in Idaho, and a stenographer for Sears, Roebuck, in Chicago. Although he approached each venture with enthusiasm, Burroughs seemed unsuited for whatever occupation he attempted, and he grew discouraged at his repeated failures. When he began his writing career at age thirty-six, it was practically as a last resort: by 1911, as one of his biographers' reports, Burroughs had been "reduced to pawning his wife's jewelry in order to pay household bills." At the time of his death in 1950, however, with ninety-one books under his belt, Edgar Rice Burroughs had become one of the most famous and best-selling writers in history, with works translated into over thirty languages and sales estimated at over fifty million.

Along with such writers as Zane Grey, William Wallace Cook, Arthur Reeve, and Cornell Woolrich, Edgar Rice Burroughs contributed to the success of the pulp-fiction industry early in its history. The "pulps" were magazines printed on cheap paper made from pulpwood that featured page after page of rip-roaring adventure yarns offered for a dime. Their inexpensive format paved the way for both the comic book and the paperback novel. Burroughs' contribution to the pulp genre was not limited to the Mars stories-within a year of the initial success of A Princess of Mars, he had surpassed himself with the first of the immensely popular Tarzan stories, Tarzan of the Apes (1912). Nor did Burroughs confine himself to a single genre; he also wrote medieval romances (The Outlaw of Torn, 1914), westerns (The War Chief of the Apaches, 1927), and mainstream novels (The Girl from Hollywood, 1922).

Not only did Burroughs quickly achieve worldwide publishing success, but Hollywood soon adapted Tarzan to the new technological and cultural phenomenon called the motion picture. The first of many Tarzan films was made in 1918, and it turned both "Burroughs" and "Tarzan" into household words. Burroughs purchased a large ranch in California, renamed it "Tarzana," and, enjoying for the first time in his life the leisure that is afforded by wealth and success, continued his prodigious output of stories and novels.

Though marital problems plagued him later in life, Burroughs was a confirmed family man and a devoted father to his three children. He also considered himself a patriotic conservative, and immediately after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941 he joined the war effort, though at sixty-six he was too old to see active service. Burroughs served as a correspondent in the Pacific until the war ended, after which his health was too poor to resume writing his adventure tales with the zeal he had once possessed.

When The Martian Tales Trilogy was first reissued in 1964, it was criticized by Time as "a milestone in American bad taste." But critics and aficionados of science fiction in more recent years have defended Burroughs and celebrated his contribution to literature, showing particular appreciation and respect for his series of Mars and Venus stories. In spite of his immense popularity and perennial editions of his works, Burroughs has been largely ignored or dismissed by academic critics. He lacks the scientific sensibility of H.G. Wells, they charge, or the literary merit of Rudyard Kipling, both of whom were contemporaries. His defenders meet these charges obliquely. Without denying their accuracy, they counter by arguing that Burroughs delivers something lacking in other writers of fantastic adventures. As science-fiction writer Jack McDevitt puts it, "When it rains in a Burroughs novel, the reader gets wet." Perhaps what makes Burroughs' novels eternally compelling is the way he stretches the bounds of verisimilitude by narrating purely fantastic events with such nonchalant matter-of-factness that what he describes becomes believably present. The Martian Tales Trilogy, by any standard, is vividly exciting.

Burroughs' The Martian Tales Trilogy resounds with the clanging of swords, the cries of damsels in distress, and the guttural gesticulations of warriors locked in dire combat. John Carter is a hero cast in the epic mold - like Odysseus and Aeneas before him, he relies on his ingenuity and martial prowess to bring off an endless series of hair's-breadth escapes. Readers with even a passing familiarity with Greek and Roman mythology will recognize the classical influences in the imaginary world that Burroughs creates on Mars, both in terms of general plot (e.g., the search for a kidnapped queen) and specific themes (e.g., the journey to the underworld). John Carter's reunion with his son in The Gods of Mars, for instance, retains a clear echo of Odysseus meeting Telemachus for the first time near the end of Homer's Odyssey.

John Carter is far from a one-dimensional hero in spite of initial appearances. A former Confederate soldier, our hero is miraculously transported from Arizona, where he is employed as a mercenary by the U.S. government to wage war on the Apaches, to Mars. In effect, Carter dies on earth and is resurrected on Mars, which gives him a kind of quasi-immortality - he prefaces his narrative by remarking that "I am not like other men." Like most epic heroes, Carter possesses a certain degree of agelessness and an aura of the supernatural. But if a mysterious out-of-body experience transports him from earth and saves him from certain death at the hands of the Apaches, he is revived on Mars only to face immediate danger from the xenophobic Martians.

Once on Mars, Carter must constantly prove himself against foe after deadly foe in his long and sustained rise to eventual lordship over the entire planet. Along the way he fights pitched battles and wins victory at the point of a sword - winning the affections of Dejah Thoris, the "princess of Mars" who gives the first book its title, and the respect and approbation of the Martian warlords whom he befriends and aligns himself with in his march to power. Throughout the trilogy, Burroughs presents a world in which violence is the basic mode of discourse. John Carter gains the respect and loyalty of the native Martians through his systematic defeat of various chieftains in mortal combat. He is able to do this partly through his natural ability - as an earthman on Mars, he is pound for pound nearly four times as strong as the average Martian - and partly because of his natural military instincts, which had been honed in the American Civil War. Some critics have decried the fact that Carter embodies much of the character of European and American colonialism, and he exhibits many of its less admirable impulses.

In the second installment of the series, The Gods of Mars, Carter exposes the fraudulent Martian religion and leads a revolt to free the Martian races from the subjugation of a theocracy that thrives on living sacrifices. The excitement of the first novel is continued as John Carter and his allies engage the Black Pirates in tense airborne combat above the dead seas of Mars. In the third book, Warlord of Mars, Carter completes his climb to power, overcoming the forces of evil that would destroy the planet and oppress its inhabitants. The trilogy ends with the Martians all clamoring for a triumphant John Carter to be their king.

To enter the Martian world of Edgar Rice Burroughs is to adopt a whole new vocabulary and to be introduced to an entirely new cultural anthropology. Mars is called "Barsoom," and the planet teems with exotic plants and animals and brightly colored races of human-like Barsoomians. Nevertheless, Barsoom is a dying planet inhabited by an ambiguous civilization: on the one hand, the Martians possess technologies that far surpass anything on earth - computers, radium-powered aircraft, and telescopes so refined that the Barsoomians can make out individual humans on earth. On the other hand, most of the Martian races are primitive and warlike: laughter for Martians is an appropriate response to exhibitions of torture, and society consists of a tribal organization whose central legislative power is violence. Many critics have suggested that the way Burroughs presents an alien culture is merely a recycling of the myth of the "noble savage" left over from the nineteenth century, and that John Carter's awe and respect for the bravery and virtue of the native Martians is eclipsed by his contempt for their primitive culture.

Such cultural chauvinism became the standard rhetoric of European and American colonialists around the turn of the nineteenth century. Burroughs, robustly patriotic throughout his life, was especially sympathetic to the fin-de-si├Ęcle philosophy and foreign policy of Teddy Roosevelt. "I am a better warrior for the reason that I am a kind master," says John Carter in The Princess of Mars, clearly an expression of Roosevelt's "speak softly and carry a big stick" diplomatic strategy. Neither is his philosophy very far removed from the cultural arrogance espoused in Rudyard Kipling's "White Man's Burden," though Burroughs inverts much of the racial hierarchy of his day by making "red men" the culturally dominant race on Mars, "black men" the oldest and "First Born" race, and relegating "whites" to the status of apes.

Burroughs was also heavily influenced by a combination of scientific ideas that were in popular circulation in the early twentieth century when he began writing. Darwin's Descent of Man (1871) clearly influenced the way in which Burroughs conceived the development of the various Martian races, while Darwin's general idea of evolution informs much of Burroughs' conception of how life on Mars originated and developed and eventually fell into decline. Another central influence was Percival Lowell, who published a series of books about Mars a few years before Burroughs started writing his Martian trilogy. Mars and Its Canals (1906) and Mars as the Abode of Life (1908) were both written by an eminent and respected astronomer who based much of his theory of planetary development and evolution on what he mistakenly identified through his telescope as canals and waterways on Mars. Lowell made the case that Mars was a dying planet whose water sources were drying up, and that the ingenious Martians had accordingly designed a complex system of aqueducts to supply their cities. Midway through A Princess of Mars, John Carter notes: "Twice we crossed the famous Martian waterways, or canals, so-called by our earthly astronomers."

Probably the best modern-day cultural counterpart we can look to in understanding the power and impact of Burroughs' early pulp fictions are Steven Spielberg's Indiana Jones films: non-stop action movies with furious and intense pacing that engage their audience and keep it on tenterhooks until the final climactic moments. It is all the more remarkable that Burroughs achieved his practically cinematic effects merely through the power of words on the printed page. The closing scenes in Burroughs' books are always ambiguous and just unresolved enough to allow for the option of a sequel. Each installment of the Martian trilogy ends with the tantalizing suggestion that John Carter is not finished with Mars.

Burroughs wrote eleven Mars novels. The first three are essentially one long narrative, best enjoyed when they are gathered together as they are in this collection. The Martian novels of Edgar Rice Burroughs have entertained readers for nearly a century now, and they have become a veritable measuring stick for assessing the quality of the specifically Martian adventure tale. Ray Bradbury, who wrote his own Burroughs-inspired collection of stories called The Martian Chronicles (1950), admired Burroughs' Martian tales because they were romantic and moved the blood as much as the mind. Other writers who have penned Mars stories inspired by Burroughs include science-fiction authors Robert Heinlein and Michael Moorcock.

Identifying precisely what makes the novels of the Martian trilogy appealing to generation after generation of readers has eluded critics for decades, though it seems clear that part of their charm is the distinctly American spirit of adventure that pervades them. Throughout his glorious exploits on a planet some 48 million miles distant, John Carter identifies himself above all else as an American (and a Virginian, no less!). Perhaps the enduring power of Edgar Rice Burroughs may be best summed up in the words of one of his most acerbic critics, John Flautz, who admitted that, apart from whatever their deficiencies, the Martian novels "say something to the American soul."

Aaron Parrett is Assistant Professor of English Literature at the University of Great Falls in Montana. He holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Georgia and is the author of The Translunar Narrative in the Western Tradition.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 197 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(82)

4 Star

(51)

3 Star

(31)

2 Star

(17)

1 Star

(16)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 197 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 25, 2008

    Great book, horrible edition

    This is a great, fun series to read. However, the edition published by Barnes & Noble is absolutely awful. I have never seen so many typos in a book in my life. There are probably 4 or 5 very obvious typos and mistakes in every single chapter. It's quite distracting. It's a shame that Barnes & Noble does not care about the quality of the books they publish. I would recommend seeking out an edition of the book published by someone else.

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 8, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    An Epic Science Fiction that is exciting from start to finish:

    I read Burroughs (Tarzan, Martian tales) when I was growing up and thoroughly enjoyed them then. A recent read proved just as entertaining: from start to finish the redoubtable John Carter faces and dispatches obstacles in various martian regions.<BR/><BR/>Notwithstanding the sometimes predictable plot, I found it hard to put the book down till I finished.<BR/><BR/>An Epic Science Fiction!

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2010

    I could hardly put this down

    This was a fantastic science fiction novel that was before its time. I was along every step of the way with John Carter and did not want to put the book down. I would recommend this to anyone with a taste for classic writing and for science fiction.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Old But Ever So Much More Than Good

    I love ERB's Mars series. I read A Princess of Mars with my mom when I was 11 and it has endured as pretty much my all time favorite book. I thank the Mars series, Star Trek TNG, and Return of the Jedi for grooming me to be the Sci Fi junky that I have grown to be. If you have never read this series I can only ask, what are you waiting for?

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2007

    Best Book Ever!

    This is by far the best book i've ever read. If your an action junkie who doesn't like a book that is too wordy, this is the book for you. The characters are great and the stories are amazing. A must for sword and planet fans as well as science fiction readers.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2006

    Without Development

    Consider this: A story that is action packed, filled with adventure, and yet, somehow it lacks the punch by the end that it should have. Now to run this out in the clear, Edgar Rice Burroughs is a great writer as far as lush descriptions and interesting dialogue are concerned. It's in his characterizations that he falters. This story in three parts is a romantic adventure, the two most important characters being Dejah Thoris and the heroic narrator John Carter, who both find each other as prisoners of the green Barsoomians. But why the three stars, you might wonder? The story leaves an empty feeling by the end, as if after all is said and done, you realize that John Carter, after killing his foes, or after regrettably extinguishing the life of another, never really feels a bit of guilt. If he were to take a bit more time for reflection we might realize that what drives him is something much more complex than the love he owns for Dejah Thoris, Princess of Mars. And yet, we never understand this because it is never explained. He has friends, yes, but they seem inconsequential, as if they're there solely to guide him through whatever conflict had then arisen. It's not a mess, though, not at all. The narrative is lush and provocative, and it draws you in from the start, and while the story goes on you feel nothing in there is extraneous--albeit sometimes calculated--but it would help if the narrator himself was a bit more introspective, and more considerate, rather than having his identity be reduced merely down to his fighting talents and his love for Dejah Thoris. During these three tales I wondered how the events could seem so necessary yet, the character development manages to run out after the first in the series. 'A Princess of Mars' might be called the best of the three, if only because the good author introduces us to everybody and we get acquainted and realize that it wouldn't be so bad after all to come back. But then by the second we might realize that everything has been said about these people, and so they're not as interesting as they should be.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 24, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Three Musketeers on Mars

    Do you like a swashbuckling, romantic adventure in space? Well, this one sucks and I couldn't recommend it less. Boring, repetitive and trite. Hard for me to believe that adults actually read it and liked it. I guess if you like a hero that has endless, unflagging strength, limitless good cheer and the personality of a cardboard cut-out, you'll love these novels. Or maybe if you're 10 years old.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2010

    As the first official Science Fiction Book, this is a must have!

    If you want an action filled read, this is certainly it!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2004

    Derring-do In A Fantastic World

    For those who like action-packed adventure, it's hard to beat Edgar Rice Burroughs.And, here, together in one book,are the first three stories of John Carter of Mars. Carter, a Civil War soldier, is a true hero to match Burroughs' other--and much more famous- hero, Tarzan. Through the three stories, we follow Carter as he fights for survival against the strange and fierce denizens of The Red Planet.He goes on to rescue a lovely 'Princess of Mars' aa well as do battle against a cult of fanatical high priests. Burroughs has a style that catches up the reader and sweeps one along through the fast-paced adventure. What also impresses me is the sheer imagination of Burroughs in the creation of his 'Barsoom,' his version of Mars based on the observations of the astronomer Percival Lowell.It is a vividly realized world unfortunately having little to do with the Mars that we know, but I think it ranks with other fantastic worlds such as Middle-Earth, Conan's Hyboria, or Dune.And the action, the derring-do, is second to none. Give it a try.And bring your sword.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2014

    This series is an interesting mix of rich imagination and plot p

    This series is an interesting mix of rich imagination and plot predictability. The books were written a century ago, almost at the dawn of SF. The modern reader may feel it is a bit dated. Burroughs reveals a rich imagination in his conception of Mars, its societies and ecologies. Character development was not a priority, and the plot often bumps along at the comic book level. By the time I reached the third book in this volume, I was often able to predict exactly what was going to happen several pages in advance of the author's actual delivery.

    I enjoyed the books. Burrough's world of Barsoom (Mars) and its hero John Carter are deservedly considered classics. But I think I would have preferred to read these books piecemeal, rather than as a single volume, one after the other. Another serious problem with this B&amp;N edition is the incredibly high number of typos in the book. I half-joked to a friend that the text must have been generated by playing an audio recording of the book to some error-prone voice-recognition software. Because of this, I’m sorry to say I will think twice before I knowing buy another paperback published by B&amp;N.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    It was free so i read it.

    The writing follow a victorian era heroic type novel. The storyline was ok, and i enjoyed it enough to finish the whole series. I probably woul have liked it more when i was ten though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    John Carter

    Isn't Disney aking a movie called JOHN CARTER, thats coming out this year (2012) ?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 24, 2011

    not worth the time investment

    the first 500 pages were interesting, but then it just goes on and on and on and start wondering why am I reading this!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2011

    enjoyed the story. but too many spelling errors. very often th was spelled m. words were shortened by syllables, ex sodity instead of solidarity. ...

    no detailed review. enjoyed the imagination of writer though of course nowadays we know that none of that is true.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 24, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Must Read!!

    Action packed from start to finish!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Definitely Different

    I am not used to reading books like this, but it was an adventure. As long as you know it is meant to be taken to the extreme sometimes, such as the fact that no matter what John Carter can never get hurt or go wrong, it is a good read - definitely fantasy. I even like how the people are naked but it isn't weird or sexual ... it is just normal. Shows how silly we can be for finding the need to cover up and make a big deal out of it. Also, I liked the creativity and the suspense. Makes you want to keep reading and it gets better and better!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2004

    Action Packed Adventure

    The best scientific romance of all time from the creator of Tarzan. Age has not changed the splendor that Burrough's weaves into his Martian tales. A great read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 197 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)