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Martin Eden [NOOK Book]

Overview

Martin Eden, Jack London's semiautobiographical novel about a struggling young writer, is considered by many to be the author's most mature work. Personifying London's own dreams of education and literary fame as a young man in San Francisco, Martin Eden's impassioned but ultimately ineffective battle to overcome his bleak circumstances makes him one of the most memorable and poignant characters Jack London ever created. As Paul Berman points out in his Introduction, "In Martin, (London) created one of the great ...
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Martin Eden

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Overview

Martin Eden, Jack London's semiautobiographical novel about a struggling young writer, is considered by many to be the author's most mature work. Personifying London's own dreams of education and literary fame as a young man in San Francisco, Martin Eden's impassioned but ultimately ineffective battle to overcome his bleak circumstances makes him one of the most memorable and poignant characters Jack London ever created. As Paul Berman points out in his Introduction, "In Martin, (London) created one of the great twisted heroes of American literature . . . a hero doomed from the outset because his own passions are bigger and more complicated than any man could bear."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781781665374
  • Publisher: Andrews UK
  • Publication date: 6/18/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 688 KB

Meet the Author

Jack London (1876-1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone. He is best remembered as the author of White Fang and Call of the Wild, set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and The Sea Wolf, of the San Francisco Bay area. London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel, The Iron Heel and his non-fiction exposé, The People of the Abyss.
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Reading Group Guide

Martin Eden, Jack London’s semiautobiographical novel about a struggling young writer, is considered by many to be the author’s most mature work. Personifying London’s own dreams of education and literary fame as a young man in San Francisco, Martin Eden’s impassioned but ultimately ineffective battle to overcome his bleak circumstances makes him one of the most memorable and poignant characters Jack London ever created. As Paul Berman points out in his Introduction, “In Martin, [London] created one of the great twisted heroes of American literature . . . a hero doomed from the outset because his own passions are bigger and more complicated than any man could bear.”
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2007

    A reviewer

    Having read the book myself, I disagree with those who regard it an inspiring tale of personal triumph. To be sure, the book dramatizes the gut-wrenching, heart-wringing struggle of the protagonist, Martin Eden, to reinvent himself, through self-study, into a versatile writer of repute with a view to making himself worthy not only of his fiancée, Ruth Morse, but also of the bourgeois society to which she belongs and in which he seeks to gain membership despite his humble origins. But the book, as anyone who has read it conscientiously knows, ends on a tragic note: Martin Eden¿s suicide at the height of his success can¿t simply be discounted. Shouldn¿t this ending then provoke one into asking whether or not the book is truly the inspirational narrative that it is popularly regarded to be? I believe it should. In my view, the book is a cautionary tale of transcendence gone awry. How so? Martin Eden¿s tenacity of purpose is predicated on his a priori conviction that his fiancée and the bourgeoisie can value his intrinsic worth as an individual of potential. But alas! Much to his profound disillusionment, he discovers later on that his fiancée and the bourgeoisie have no appreciation at all 'and can never have any' for what he is and what he¿s willing himself to be. Only when Fame and Fortune have already smiled on him are they prepared to regard him well ¿ and only superficially so at that. In other words, Martin Eden realizes he is wrong in believing they can value him on his own terms, not on theirs only his extrinsic worth as an individual of attainment matters to them, and like it or not, that¿s all he can ever expect of them. That the force of realization is strong enough to dissipate his passion for living is hardly surprising. He has inadvertently foredoomed himself by obsessively seeking genuine affirmation from the people of the `wrong¿ sort. It can¿t be otherwise especially in view of his rigid sense of self-consistency, which prevents him from accepting the way things are and amending himself accordingly. Whether or not his suicide then is an act of lunacy, cowardice, or plain weakness, one thing is certain: it is arguably an act of repudiation like Kate Chopin¿s tragic heroine Edna Pontellier¿s in the Awakening. Their suicides, which coincidentally involved entombing themselves in watery graves, could be said to constitute the ultimate statement of defiance against their societies that have given them much sorrow.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    Best book

    This is my favorite book ever! Its very different but very good.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2006

    Flaws Refered Where Corrected in 2002

    Yes, the bad printing was corrected in 2002 on the edition published by Synergy International of The Americas - on the bright red cover as are all books published by us (Jack Liondon)and also on B. Traven books. 5 Stars from this publisher

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2005

    A exellent book for exelerated readers.

    Martin Eden is the best book I've read so far! The first sentence will get you intrested right away. Set in San Fransico, it's a love story and a adventure combined. Martin, a not so well educated sailor falls in love with a upper class woman he meets one day while eating dinner. He wants to be come smarter so he starts reading books. But his money runs out from his previous job so he has to go to sea. When he goes to sea he jumps overbored and he kills himself by swimming downuntill he cant get back to the surface with his breath. A good story with alot of big word though.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2005

    Suprisingly good

    London succeeds quite well in this effort . Martin Eden is part love story, part psychological study, part social manifesto, and part autobiography. London is able to blend these elements into a cohesive whole that is both fascinating and thought provoking. It is a wonderful story that will certainly make an impression

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2004

    Shame of the Sun

    Martin Eden is indeed the most mature of London's works as Mr. Sinclair said. I don't know what version the other reviewer was reading, but the Modern Library Classics edition doesn't have any of these flaws and comes with a notes section. A very compelling read and another great look into how depressed the human mind can become. Another work of genius by London.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2003

    We writers...

    I understood what is the book about and I really identify myself with this book. You can see it everywhere - the film Guru - he was talking about great things, but people werent listening to him, they were just squawking, because other people were squawking and because it was 'in'. The same is Martin Eden and it shows how poor is this world - genius is rated by average people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    Beautiful

    Beautiful

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    Martin tells it like he sees it, sadly true today, I second the

    Martin tells it like he sees it, sadly true today, I second the Anonymous review of 6/16/2007. I give the story 5 stars, Jack London was the best. There still is a "bourgeois society" and it still has it's attitudes. Same story today in Reston Virginia where I live. That is why they call these books classics, their story is timeless, true a century ago - and true today.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2002

    Excellent book, poor printing.

    This book is not put together well. Pages 221-222 do not appear between 220 and 223, but at the end of the book. Page 482 ends in mid-sentence. Pages 483-486 are missing. Jack London is a genius, and he deserves better than this.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2013

    Snowsky

    Snowsky smiled. "Thank you for your hospitality, but I can't. I must keep looking for my brother. I will not rest until I know he is either alive or dead. But once I find out, I will return here. May Starclan light your path." She told Fadingstorm, then padded away, giving him one last glance over her shoulder before disappearing in the distance.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2013

    Angelwing

    She narrowed her eyes, keeping an eye on the border ahead. ((You do? Alright, I will.))

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2013

    FadingStorm

    FadingStorm prowls along the border, refreshing the scent markers and checking for anything unfamiliar.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    Poor quality scanning, don't bother

    This book, which originated in the Internet Archive and should have bern left there, suffrs from a distractingly poor scanning job. Higher quality, free-of-charge versions abound elsewhere, e.g. at Feedbooks. I'm deleting this book and warn you to avoid this particular version. I'm surprised and disappointed BN allows weeds like this one into its walled garden.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    This book's in Swedish

    I don't read Swedish, so I cannot comment on this edition's quality, except to warn that : 1- that wasn't prominently enough indicated to steer me away, and 2- Nook books lacking titles have typically proven, in my experience, synonymous with poor legibility. I'm deleting this book immediately after writing this review.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

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