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Martin the Warrior (Redwall Series #6)

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Overview

On the shore of the Eastern Sea, in a cold stone fortress, a stoat named Badrang holds dozens of innocent creatures as slaves, part of his scheme to build an empire where he will rule as unquestioned tyrant.  Among those slaves is a mouse named Martin who has a warrior's heart and a burning desire for freedom-freedom not only for himself, but for all of Badrang's victims.  There is no risk he will not take, no battle he will not fight, to end the stoat's evil reign and in the process regain the sword of...

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Overview

On the shore of the Eastern Sea, in a cold stone fortress, a stoat named Badrang holds dozens of innocent creatures as slaves, part of his scheme to build an empire where he will rule as unquestioned tyrant.  Among those slaves is a mouse named Martin who has a warrior's heart and a burning desire for freedom-freedom not only for himself, but for all of Badrang's victims.  There is no risk he will not take, no battle he will not fight, to end the stoat's evil reign and in the process regain the sword of his father, Luke the Warrior-the sword that Badrang stole from him when he was but a lad!

For ages 9 and above.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In a starred review of this 1994 installment in the Redwall series, PW commented that ``Jacques's classically inspired plot-weaving achieves virtuosity.'' All ages. (Apr.)
Publishers Weekly
In a starred review of this 1994 installment in the Redwall series, PW said, "Jacques's classically inspired plot-weaving achieves virtuosity." Ages 12-up. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
As usual, Brian Jacques fans will welcome his sixth book, Martin the Warrior. Jacques has a large and loyal following of kids eight to eighty. The reasons for these legions of fans are once again apparent. The three hundred-odd pages hold swashbuckling adventures of derring-do, laugh out loud humor, and a multitude of cliff hanging moments that make the book impossible for even the most reluctant reader to put down. Martin appeared in Jacques' first book, Redwall, and has set standards for heroism in every book that followed. Martin's ghost guides the "good" through the other five books, but Martin's own history was mysterious until now. Jacques tells all-how Martin rises from enslavement to unite forests of oppressed creatures to do battle with the tyrannical stoat, Badrang, and to bring down Marshank, his fortress of evil. The truth behind the shadowy details of Martin's one true love and the meaning behind the power of Martin's sword, a weapon that empowers all the heroes and heroines that follow Martin's path, are revealed. Jacques' writing provides some of the most dramatic family read aloud material to be found in children's books, and once again there's the satisfying triumph of good over evil at the book's end.
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-Jacques adds another tale to his Redwall fantasy series. This is the story of Martin as a brash young mouse and so precedes both Mossflower (1988) and Redwall (1987, both Philomel). Martin is a prisoner slave in the fortress of the tyrant, Badrang. Escaping with a group of other prisoners, the animals are separated, and spend the rest of the book trying to find one another, mingling with a large cast of colorful characters, good and bad, along the way. Meanwhile, back at the fortress, the evil Badrang is fighting for his life against the equally evil Captain Clogg, who has arrived by sea to try to wrest control. In the end, Martin and his compatriots arrive in time to assure that good triumphs, but only after an almost unbelievable series of swashbuckling episodes and close calls. The story is a complex one with three strains going on simultaneously, and only sophisticated readers will be able to follow it. Jacques writes to a formula of constant action and high adventure as good fights evil. He is able to carry it off because his plots are exciting with lots of tension, and because he is able to establish distinctive and interesting personalities throughout each book. This story carries readers along at a breathless pace and stands well with the others in the series. However, it offers nothing new and is not essential to the enjoyment of the previous books.-Jane Gardner Connor, South Carolina State Library, Columbia
School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-In this sixth book of the Redwall series, Brian Jacques relates the tale of how the mouse warrior of Redwall gained his title and his fame. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Sally Estes
Jacques continues his popular Redwall series in a sixth entry--set prior to "Mossflower" (1988), which details how Martin brought peace to Mossflower Woods. This tale harks back to the making of Martin the Warrior, whose spirit has encouraged and whose sword has been wielded by later warriors battling threats to the woodlands. "He was only a young mouse, but of strong build, with a glint in his eye that proclaimed him a born fighter." And he has been enslaved by the heartless stoat Badrang the Tyrant, chieftain of a horde of weasels, ferrets, foxes, and rats, who is ruthlessly using slave labor to build a fortress on the Eastern Coast. Once again, various bands of protectors have separate adventures and eventually converge at the fort for the final bloody battle. As usual, Jacques does not gloss over violence and gore, his good guys are really good and the bad ones evil to the core, and there's a great deal of humor and camaraderie and good eating. Particularly poignant in this episode is the death in the culminating battle of the mousemaid Rose, whose namesake rose later blooms and flourishes in her memory on the Redwall Abbey grounds. Another winning tale for the saga's many fans.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780142400555
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 2/9/2004
  • Series: Redwall Series , #6
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 765,548
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.06 (w) x 7.78 (h) x 1.08 (d)

Meet the Author

Brian  Jacques
Brian Jacques has had many professions, including longshoreman, truck driver and folk singer.  In addition to a vast international readership, he has acquired a devoted army of listeners with his weekly radio program on BBC Merseyside.  For this recording Brian himself leads a full cast of actors he personally selected for their ability to bring his characters to vivid life.

Fans of Brian Jacques will enjoy Redwall, the first installment in this saga, which is also available from Listening Library.  This recording, performed by the author and a full cast, was a 1998 Audie Award winner.

Biography

The drawings that open the chapters in a Redwall book may look sweet, but Brian Jacques' fantasies are not for the faint of heart. Adventure, peril, betrayal, and downright slaughter abound in these hefty novels about the creatures -- mice, hares, moles, badgers, and sparrows -- who inhabit Redwall Abbey in medieval England.

Brian Jacques has had a life nearly as exciting as that of some of his characters: After dropping out of school in his native Liverpool at the age of 15, he traveled the world as a merchant seaman, visiting ports from America to Asia. Upon returning to England, he held a wide variety of jobs, from railway fireman to boxer among them. In the 1960s, he and his two brothers formed the Liverpool Fishermen, a folksinging group. Jacques also tried his hand as a playwright, producing several stage plays -- Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, Scouse – about native Liverpudlians.

The Redwall stories, which were to earn him legions of fans, were born out of his time as a volunteer storyteller at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool. Jacques maintains that his detailed writing style was developed here; he was forced to be as descriptive as possible, so his audience would be able to experience his stories as if they could see. He created the first Redwall story as a gift to the children of the school, but never intended to publish it commercially. Fortunately for his many fans on both sides of the Atlantic, a friend sent his first manuscript to a publisher, and the rousing series took off in England in 1986 and in the U.S. the following year with Redwall.

Jacques takes issue with the notion that his books are "fantasy" fiction, a description that he says "smacks of swords and sorcery and dungeons and dragons. . . . I like to think of my books as old-fashioned adventures that happened ‘Once upon a time, long ago and far away.'"

The novels appeal generally to an audience of nine- to fifteen-year-olds, but have admirers both younger and older. The tales pivot on the conflict between good and evil; good invariably triumphs. Indeed, morality issues are always clear in Jacques' books: cruelty, greed, and avarice are eradicated in all forms; bravery, loyalty, and resourcefulness reap rewards aplenty. When it comes to characters, though, Jacques is less simplistic: Martin the Warrior, who through his courage and cunning rose to become the noblest hero in the land, is given to impetuousness, and the miscreant Cluny has both good and bad sides, a la Long John Silver.

For female readers, the Redwall books can be extra satisfying. His female creatures are as adventurous as the males: they don't faint into their male counterparts' arms, but explore, swashbuckle, and rescue on their own. In Mariel of Redwall (1991), the courageous girl mousechild Mariel, thrown overboard by the Gabool, leader of the evil pirate Searats, exacts her own brand of revenge.

Jacques' usually swift pace sometimes comes to a slogging halt with extraordinarily detailed descriptions of the legendary Redwall feasts, right down to the last acorn and drop of buttercup and honey cordial. But the author is redeemed by his delicate interweaving of subplots, his memorable menagerie, his rollicking sense of adventure, and his ability to transport the reader into an entirely different world, a world that, as one critic for The New York Times put it, "is both an incredible and ingratiating place, one to which readers will doubtless cheerfully return."

Good To Know

Brian Jacques wrote his books in longhand or on a manual typewriter, or, if the weather permits, outdoors.

Despite his success as an author, Jacques continued to broadcast the weekly radio show, Jakestown, that he hosted before he wrote the Redwall books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      June 15, 1939
    2. Place of Birth:
      Liverpool, England
    1. Date of Death:
      February 5, 2011
    2. Place of Death:
      Liverpool, England
    1. Education:
      St. John’s School, Liverpool, England
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 120 )
Rating Distribution

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(98)

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(16)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 120 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Must Read First in the Serries!

    Jacques 6th novel in the Redwall serries is a must read first for any one starting the Redwall serries. Martin the warrior is a key character who is essential in all of the books in the serries & his begginings as chronicled in this book helps set the stage for the others. this one by far is my favorite of all the books and i find it an excellent read overall. For a sort of Triligical beginning of the serries i recomend this book followed by Mossflower & the Ledgend of Luke.

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  • Posted December 1, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Favorite Childhood Book

    Only a man like Brian Jacques to bring tears to my eyes because of a story about mice. Martin the Warrior was a book that I read back in fifth grade, then re-read last week in the tenth grade. The story never ceases to amaze me. In the world of Redwall, animals both good and bad come together and adventure. One of the best qualities of the Redwall series as a whole is that you can start anywhere you want. Martin the Warrior is the sixth in the series and I read it first. It'd be more beneficial to read it in order, but it really doesn't matter.
    Martin the Warrior follows the brave and bold warrior Martin, son of Luke, Redwall's previous glorified hero. Martin spends the entire book fighting off an evil tyrant named Badrang. The story proves that no matter how daunting or unnerving you're opposition may appear, you must endure. I loved how amazingly easy it was to enjoy this book and how you could relate to it still knowing that the whole time, you're reading about animals. The only thing I disliked was how it dragged on. It felt there was many parts he could've just scrapped without changing the ending in any way. It can also be a bit hard to understand the dialogue of the moles due to the way their accent is written, however, one shouldn't set this book aside merely for those couple of flaws. Many should read this book, especially if you're young like me for the simple fact that it will make you a better reader. I have the Redwall series to thank for much of my literary knowledge.
    For recommendations, I highly, highly recommend the entire Redwall series. My personal favorites are The Legend of Luke, Lord Brocktree, and Outcast of Redwall.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2009

    Martin the Warrior

    In Martin the Warrior Lord Badrang has many slaves in his fortress of Marshank. Martin, son of Luke the Warrior, promised his father he would keep his sword safe but Badrang took it from him and enslaved him. Over the seasons Martin grew stronger. He finally escaped with the help of some new friends. He was thrown in the dugeon by lord badrang along with two others. Brome and Feldoh were in the dungeon with him. Brome's sister Rose and her friend Grumm helped them escape. When they were running away from Marshank they ran into badrang's enemy Tramun Clogg. They tried to swim away but they were separated when a big fish tried to attack them. Brome and Feldoh wandered around for a while and met the Rambling Rosehip Players. Rose, Martin, and Grumm were taken captive by a tribe of Pygmy shrews. They met Pallum who was also a slave of the pygmy shrews. They earned their freedom when Dinjer the son of Queen Amballa was taken by a seabird. Martin raced up the cliff and saved Dinjer. The Rambling Rosehip players helped to free some slaves. Martin, Rose, Grumm, and Pallum made an army with the help of some friends. They got to Marshank just as Brome and Felldoh's army was about to be defeated. There were many positives in this book like it was funny, there was always something going on, and all of the characters were animals. These are positives for me because I like funny books. I also like it when there is always something or more than one thing going on in the story. I also like animals as characters because it makes the book more interesting. There was one negative I found in the book and it was that there was too much war, but all the Redwall books I've read have had alot of war in them. The writing style of Brian Jacques is that he is very descriptive. He has many adventures going on at once. He switches back and forth between them. Brian Jacques tells the story by making a character tell it from third person omniscient point of view. This character did not witness these events but tells the story to another character. In Redwall Abbey there is a tapestry with a picture of Martin on it and a traveler named Aubritia asks Father Saxtus if he knows alot about Martin, he does not and she tells him the story. The characters speak in different dialect, the moles "oi" instead of "i" and they and "n"s before "d"s and "t"s. The hares say "jolly", "chap", and " wot wot". I would recommend this book to kids around the age of 12 because there is alot of fighting and some of the characters names are hard to pronounce. I wouldn't recommend this book to extreme animal lovers because weasels, rats, and stoats get killed often in the book. Some similar books are Redwall, Mossflower, Mattimeo, Mariel of Redwall, and Salamandastron. I think that Martin the Warrior is a very good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2008

    Wonderful, Pure Genious

    It's emotionaly and physicaly involving, it's sure to bring laughs upon laughs, and mabye the occasional tear. 5/5

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2007

    ...

    This was the first book I read out of the Redwall series, and I was impressed by the descriptions. It is rare that I read a book where surroundings are described as vividly as in this book. Not only was I drawn into the story, but I was able to envision it, live it. Only master storytellers are able to create words that are worth a thousand pictures, and Brian Jaques is among the best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2007

    I LOVED IT!!!!!

    This is one of my favorite books!!!!! I love books about animals!! A MUST read!!!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2007

    Best book ever!

    This book is the best! I am a #1 Redwall fan! I have the movie for this book. buy it at barnes and noble under foriegn film. In the book Rose dies by hitting her head against the wall. in the movie she gets stabbed by martin's sword. also the movie is way sadder than the book. in the book martin and rose never confess their love for one another, but they do in the movie! ( rose kisses martin!) everyone wishes that rose had lived, but if she had she and martin would of married and lived in noonvale, and redwall would never be built and mossflower would not be in peace.i'm writting a fanfic where martin and rose and several other redwallers live in modern times and go to middle school. rose is martin's girlfriend and they beat up badrang. happy reading fellow redwallers!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2006

    A Mouse Warrior With A Brave Heart!

    Two thumbs up for Brian Jacques! This awesome book is very descriptive and very exciting. My favorite quote of this book was when Martin says 'I will live to take back my fathers sword and slay you Badrang!' I like it because it tells the reader that Martin is not scared for what is yet to come. The high point in this story is when Martin, Rose, Grumm, and Brome run away from Fort Marshtank and while they are escaping they get separated. The next time they see each other there is a raging battle and they are fighting side by side. Do you think they can win it? I like this book because I have always liked Brain Jacques's writing and I like fantasy and wars a lot like when Captain Cloggs tries to take over Fort Marshtank. If you do too this is the book for you!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2006

    A true Redwaller

    A wonderful book!Brovo Mr. Jacques!!If you are a redwall fan and dont have this book, then go to Barns and Noble now and get it!And if your a reader who is looking 4 a book, look no ferther.This book is about a warrior mouse named martin who is a slave under the rule of an eivl stoat named badrang.And with the help of his friends martin can free all the slaves of Marshank and reclaim the sword of luke [his father] witch badrang stole from him when he was yonger.Most people think its wierd to think that animals can talk, but if you like redwall then who cares what those people think.It's completly createve and a wonderful book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2006

    Two giant thumbs up!

    I couldn't put this book down! It had so much emotion! It was sad and funny and very, very exciting! I cried at the end, but that only made me love the more! I know it's just a made up story, but I sort of feel like it's real! Martin's story goes straight to your heart! Read it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2006

    this has to one of the best books in the series

    This is deffinitly is one of my favorite installments in the Redwall series the plot is terrific

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2006

    THE BOOK YOU WANT TO READ BEFORE YOU DIE!

    I cannot put into words how good this book is! This is the best book I have read. Brian Jacques does a great job on describing the characters. In fact he gets you to know the characters so well that when a character you've grown attached to suddendly dies you're torn apart and think ,'How could this happen?!?!?'Anyway... this book has everything a good book should have. Vividly described characters, Stunningly explaned scenery,tons of action and good food! A book that's not to be overlooked-A work of art. P.S. You don't even have to read the books that came before this one. I didn't!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2005

    WOW

    This book is an awesome edition for the Redwall series! I never put it down and even have it on CD's so i can listen to it while I fall asleep!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2005

    THIS BOOK ROCKS

    This book kepted me going until the end. I highly advise you to read this book. One more thing, I hope there are more great books like this from Brain Jacques.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2005

    very good book!!!!!!

    it was a very good book!!!!sad,funny,exiting!!!!if you want to read the e first in the seris then read lord brocktree!!!!! ill love this!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2005

    You Should Realy Read This Book!

    By far the best in the Redwall series, Martin the Warrior displays consepts usually unknown to the series. It is powerful and in depth. The truly devistating ending adds to the quality of the book (though we all wish it could be different). The action is nail-biting and the detail phenominal. It will make you say, 'Who says rodents can't be cool!?!'

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2005

    Brian Jacques + Martin the Warrior = Cool!!!

    The sixth book in the Redwall series is one of the best... whereas it has elaborate details, humor, delicious meals and creative names. It's a bit better than Redwall though... but Martin's first adventure packs a wallop.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2005

    WOW!!!

    This is a fantastic book that is VERY hard to put down. Martin the Warrior is fantastic from start to finish and never stops thrilling you. It is about a young mouse named Martin with a warrior's heart who is captured by Badrang the Tyrant and taken to his evil fortress of Marshank. Martin desperately desires freedom and plans to gather an army to defeat the Tyrant and rid the land of this horrible evil...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2005

    Outstandingly written your nose is glued in!!!

    My favorite author has done it again in a great tale of the legend that started it all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2004

    This great book will have you hungry for the rest of the series after you get through with the first of a imaculate series, Redwall.

    If you are looking for a good book that will be egging you to read the rest of the series, I have the book for you!Martin the Warrior the second book of the Redwall series, is an emotional story that represents love,care,bravery,courage,and best of all revange! This story is a great action book! Definitely when Martin decides to take revange on Badrang! But it all starts when Luke (Martin's father) leaves and gives him his sword, promising in it that he will see Martin agian.Then Martin shows up,takes Martins sword,and throws Martin and his helpless grandmother into slavery! Another reason I love this book so much is because it is really just Martin the Warriors life story.The story moves on to that Martin meets Felldoh, a young courageous squirrel.Then when Rose-a beautiful young mouse coming to save Brome, her brother-comes everything is changed for Martin!They escape to Noonvale, but turn back to Marshank to take revenge! Will Marshank finally fall and which creature will return dead? Well to find out, you have to read Martin the Warrior!

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