Marty McGuire

Marty McGuire

4.5 4
by Kate Messner, Brian Floca
     
 

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A fun, accessible chapter-book debut from an exciting new talent--simultaneous hardcover-paperback launch!

Marty McGuire would rather spend recess catching frogs in the pond than playing dress-up with the other girls in third grade. So when her teacher casts Marty as the princess in the class play, Marty's absolutely, positively sure that there's been a huge

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Overview

A fun, accessible chapter-book debut from an exciting new talent--simultaneous hardcover-paperback launch!

Marty McGuire would rather spend recess catching frogs in the pond than playing dress-up with the other girls in third grade. So when her teacher casts Marty as the princess in the class play, Marty's absolutely, positively sure that there's been a huge mistake. But after a special lesson in the art of improvisation, Marty comes up with her OWN plan to IMPROVE the play: Why use stuffed-animal frog onstage when a live one would be so much better? In the end, Marty's one-of-a-kind performance makes for an unforgettable show. Maybe Marty CAN live happily ever after, after all!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
Marty was really looking forward to third grade; after all, her second grade teacher had promised it would be even better than second had been. Unfortunately, reality was not matching up with that billing. Veronica Grace has "stolen" Marty's best friend Annie. Annie no longer wants to catch frogs and crayfish, climb trees or play in the woods pretending to be Jane Goodall. Now she has joined the Veronica Grace fan club, and Marty is hurting. When their teacher announces they will be spending the next few weeks preparing a class play based on The Frog Prince and that Marty will play the princess, Marty is mortified. She is so not a princess! Her mother and teacher join forces and there is no way out for Marty. Even she has to admit rehearsals are fun, especially when their drama coach teaches them about improvisation. With the help of a boy in the class, Marty hatches up some improv of her own for the night of the performance. Annie joins forces with them and their efforts bring down the house. The girls patch up their friendship and help Veronica Grace widen her world. Messner is right on target with Marty, who will appeal to fans of Judy Moody, Clementine, and Junie B. She is a typical eight-year-old, who has to deal with friendships changing, school, and rash ideas. Floca's plentiful pen-and-ink sketches (not final in the Advanced Copy) are full of humor and help move the reader through the story. The book has an open design, with a fair amount of white space, making it very accessible for readers just venturing into chapter books. I predict this will become a read-aloud in the primary grades and certainly hope this is the first of several books about Marty. Reviewer: Peg Glisson
Kirkus Reviews

When the promised land of third grade does not pan as promised, Marty McGuire finds herself playing a completely new role.

Mrs. Aloi, her maracas-shaking teacher, is putting together the parts for the class play of The Frog Prince, and she decides that Marty is perfect for the part of the princess. Marty, who prefers learning about frog anatomy to kissing or, worse, throwing a frog, is horrified. She gets little support from her scientist mother or her teacher father—a princess she shall be! On top of this bad news, Marty's best friend has joined the girly-girl group and does not seem interested in playing outside and pretending to be Jane Goodall anymore. Messner gets all the details of third grade right: the social chasm between the girls who want to be like the older kids and the ones who are still little girls, the Mad Minutes for memorizing arithmetic facts, the silly classroom-control devices teachers use and the energy students of this age put into projects like class plays. Floca's black-and-white sketches are filled with movement and emotion and are frequent enough to help new chapter-book readers keep up with this longer text.

Believable and endearing characters in a realistic elementary-school setting will be just the thing for fans of Clementine and Ramona. (Fiction. 7-10)

Children's Literature - Karen McCoy
Marty McGuire is perfectly content chasing frogs in her muddy tennis shoes. So it is completely unfair that she has to portray a princess in the school play. To her dismay, her objections fall on deaf ears—including those of her teacher Mrs. Aloi, who convinces Marty's mom that she is perfect for the part—and now her mom thinks the play is a great idea too. But Marty thinks snooty Veronica Grace would be much better, or even her ex-friend Annie, who has suddenly decided that playing dress-up is cooler than running in the woods and pretending to be Jane Goodall. As opening night draws closer, Marty hatches an idea that will be sure to make the play a thing to remember—all while learning that being a pretend princess might not be so bad after all. Messner creates an engaging, educational narrative enhanced by charming sound effects, including Mrs. Aloi's maracas, while author Morris (Clique and the "Ivy & Bean" series) captures Marty's voice perfectly, with her narration seamlessly woven into the story. Young readers will enjoy this sassy and endearing protagonist, especially those who already enjoy the "Junie B. Jones" and "Ramona" series. Appropriate for all emerging readers, and a great story to read aloud. Reviewer: Karen McCoy

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545142441
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
05/01/2011
Series:
Marty McGuire Series
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
660L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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