The Marvelous Land Of Oz: Being An Account Of The Further Adventures Of The Scarecrow And Tin Woodman, And Also The Strange Experiences Of The Highly Magnified Woggle-bug, Jack Pumpkinhead, The Animated Sawhorse, And The Gump...

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The Marvelous Land of Oz

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781279370636
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 4/2/2012
  • Pages: 324
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

L. Frank Baum
Not only is L. Frank Baum’s classic The Wonderful Wizard of Oz one of the most enduring and magical children’s books ever written, it’s also -- with its adventurousness and its lessons of resourcefulness, friendship, courage, and self-reliance -- one of the most American.

Biography

Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, Aunt Em -- where would our national psyche be without The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? L. Frank Baum, who created a story with an indelible, sometimes haunting impression on so many people, led a life that had a fairy-tale quality of its own.

Baum was born in 1856 to a family that had made a fortune in the oil business. Because he had a heart condition, his parents arranged for him to be tutored privately at the family’s Syracuse estate, “Roselawn.” As an adult, though, Baum flourished and failed at a dizzying variety of ventures, from writing plays to a stint with his family’s medicinal oil business (where he produced a potion called “Baum’s Castorine”), to managing a general store, to editing the Aberdeen Pioneer in Aberdeen, South Dakota. In 1897, following his mother-in-law’s advice, Baum wrote down the stories that he told his children. The firm of Way & Williams published the stories under the title Mother Goose in Prose, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, and Baum’s career as a writer was launched.

With the publication of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, Baum gained instant success. The book, lavishly produced and featuring voluptuous illustrations by William Wallace Denslow, was the bestselling children’s book of the year. It also set a new standard for children’s literature. As a commentator for the September 8, 1900 New York Times described it, “The crudeness that was characteristic of the oldtime publications...would now be enough to cause the modern child to yell with rage and vigor...” The reviewer praised the book’s sheer entertainment value (its “bright and joyous atmosphere”) and likened it to The Story of the Three Bears for its enduring value. As the film industry emerged in the following years, few books were as manifestly destined for adaptation, and although it took almost four decades for a movie studio to translate Baum’s vision to film, the 1939 film did for the movies what Baum’s book had done for children’s literature: that is, raised the imaginative and technical bar higher than it had been before.

The loss of parents, the inevitable voyage toward independence, the yearning for home -- in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum touched upon a child’s primal experiences while providing a rousing story of adventure. As his health declined, Baum continued the series with 14 more Oz books (his publisher commissioned more by other authors after his death), but none had quite the effect on the reading public that the first one did. Baum died from complications of a stroke in 1919.

Good To Know

Baum founded the National Association of Window Trimmers and published a magazine for the window-trimming trade – he also raised exotic chickens.

Buam was married to Maud Gage, a daughter of the famous women’s rights advocate Matilda Joslyn Gage.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Floyd Akers, Laura Bancroft, George Brooks, Edith Van Dyne, Schuyler Staunton, John Estes Cooke, Suzanne Metcalf, Louis F. Baum, Lyman Frank Baum (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 15, 1856
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chittenango, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1919
    2. Place of Death:
      Hollywood, California

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(34)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 6, 2011

    Eltanin gets it right

    These works are available in the public domain. You can get all the Oz books at Project G, including illustrated versions of most. BUT. It is all in the formatting. This review is for the Eltanin Publishing editions, which as of this writing has done the second and third books of the series (Marvelous Land and Ozma). They have done a masterful job in these two efforts. It is all about the illustrations. I prefer my kids to read books on our iPad. But, for books with illustrations, I have them read the paper versions instead. I haven't forgotten the illustrations, even so many years later, of the books I read as a child. And so I want my children to have the same experience. So the test for whether a children's ebook makes the cut for me is in the quality of the pictures. For books like the Oz series, books that are in the public domain, this means how well a job did the editor do formatting the text and scanning the illustrations. Results vary widely. Always "download the sample" if you are buying them here at B&N. Another thing to consider: did the editor include ALL the illustrations. Perhaps some were omitted, on a rush job. These "editors" are taking things from the public domain, formatting them, and selling them for a couple bucks. Fine. But are they doing a good job? Are they being thorough? I am very picky about this. I want my kids to have ALL the pictures, every one. Otherwise we will just read the paper book. But for the Oz books, there is one additional wildcard. Even some very fine versions on Project G still omit a particular kind of illustration: the "first-word-in-the-chapter" illustration. Baum's original books (and these are what are in the public domain) began most chapters with an illustration, and the first letter of the first sentence was integrated into the illustration. Almost without exception, ebook editors have been omitting these illustrations when reproducing the Oz series. Even very nicely done versions (check out the Ozma of Oz illustrated version on Project G for an example), without these beginning chapter illustrations, are going to be missing a lot of artwork. The Eltanin versions get it right. Text formatting is perfect (one expects nothing less on this front). The scans of the illustrations are sharp and clear (this can vary widely for other publishers, always download the sample!). And ALL illustrations are included. I do hope they continue the series for the other 12 books of the series. I would be interested in any of their other children's book projects, if they continue on at this high standard.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Well formatted, beautiful original illustrations!

    A lot of PubIt classics are known for being poorly formatted with lots of errors. Not so with this one! This publisher clearly took their time with the formatting, and did an excellent job reproducing the illustrations. They even look good on the black and white of my original Nook! The result is a large file, but it's WELL worth it. I will be impatiently waiting for them to finish reproducing the rest of the books in the series!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    For the best illustrations, get the Eltanin Publishing edition

    I got the free versions of all the classics, including the Wizard of Oz series. But the free versions don't have the illustrations. I didn't know what I was missing until I found the Oz ebooks that do have the original illustrations. Some are terrible quality - only some of the images are included or they are really small or grainy. But I stumbled upon Eltanin Publishing's series - the illustrations look great, and it seems like they are all there. They have done the first 4 books of the series so far. But something is wrong with the reviews - my reviews and others are showing up under other versions of the books. So make sure you find the Eltanin Publishing version (just search for "Eltanin").

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2014

    Want to read it

    I want to read it the first one was so cool and i want to see what happens next

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  • Posted June 25, 2013

    The Marvelous Land of Oz is the second book in L. Frank Baum's O

    The Marvelous Land of Oz is the second book in L. Frank Baum's Oz adventures. We are treated to the further adventures of the Scarecrow (now the King of the Emerald City), The Tin Woodman (now an Emperor of his own kingdom), their new human friend Tip, Jack a magical pumpkin-man, a magical saw horse and a giant Woggle-bug. Not as "magical" as the original (or nearly as dark), but still a fun and sweet tale that gives us an all too brief return to the Land of Oz. Our heroes embark on an adventure to restore the Scarecrow to his thrown after being overthrown by a group of determined women with very sharp knitting needles. During their quest they overcome obstacles thrown at them by witches, fight nasty birds, enchant a couch with a "Gump" head on it, reunite with Glenda and search for Ozma, the rightful heir to the Emerald City throne. A fun and quick read that, while not as good as the first Oz book, still puts a smile on your face.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    I want to read it

    Loved it so much

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2013

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2013

    asdfmovie

    I baked you a pie. Oh boy what flavor? Pie flavor.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    Rawr

    Rawr

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Summer

    "Everyone, please, stay calm." i bound in. ~Summer

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2013

    Raven

    "Nice one!" I meow, but fall silent when I sense a mouse scuttling in the undergrowth. I drop once more into a hunter's crouch, and swiftly catch the small creature. I place it beside my sparrow, then say, "Think we should take this back to camp, or keep hunting?"
    # Raven #

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Skystar

    Whaks Skybird or whatever in the face with the flaming tree

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Dawnpaw

    Dawnpaw's spirit burst through the forest, wailing. She had no idea where to go. She skidded to a halt when she saw Echo's spirit, and her eyes widened.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2013

    Coal

    He looked down at his paws. He looked up sadly. He then pad out sadly. He went off to the cove. Bye glimmer. He said sadly.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2012

    Sierra

    Me? Its sierra. What is this place?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    Penny to below

    Hi im ur trainer ccan u tell me ur name?

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    Sierra

    Hello

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    DISTRICT SIX

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 19, 2011

    An Imaginative Reading Adventure!

    My sons have thoroughly enjoyed this series by L. Frank Baum. They find it a refreshing change from the every day. It only goes to prove that no matter what is going on in the big bad world, there is nothing like a good book and "no place like home" to read it in!

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  • Posted July 29, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Strange and Imaginative

    "The Mar­velous Land of Oz" by L. Frank Baum is the sec­ond story in set in the fic­tional land of Oz. The book how­ever is not about Dorothy.

    Tip is a young boy who lives with a witch named Mom­bie. Being fed up with the way he is being treated, Tip runs away with a pump­kin man he brought to life which he calls Jack Pump­kin­head. Together the two friends explore the Oz on their way to Emer­ald City so they can meet its king, the Scarecrow.

    "The Mar­velous Land of Oz" by L. Frank Baum takes place after the "Won­der­ful Wiz­ard of Oz" ends. The story fol­lows a boy named Tip and, while I didn't feel it was as good as its pre­de­ces­sor, is cer­tain a worth­while read just to get a glimpse into Baum's imag­i­na­tion.

    The writ­ing in this book seemed forced, while I liked the mes­sage that the Tin Woods­man (heart) and Scare­crow (brain) need one another to coex­ist, the main char­ac­ter was strange and the end­ing was freaky.

    Baum intro­duces some new char­ac­ters: Jack Pump­kin­head, Mombi the witch among oth­ers which are very imag­i­na­tive. I did find other aspects of the story inter­est­ing though, but not what Baum intended. The dif­fer­ence between 2011 and 1904 makes a great dis­cus­sion with chil­dren and adults alike. For exam­ple, the women of Oz are happy at the men tak­ing over the house­hold duties because they are only truly happy at finally get­ting a chance to cook a good meal.

    The more I read the book; I sadly real­ized that in 2011 a book like this has a very slim chance of actu­ally get­ting pub­lished. The polit­i­cal cor­rect crowd will demol­ish half the book before it gets to the printer and the con­ser­v­a­tive move­ment will gladly destroy the other half.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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