Mary and Martha

Mary and Martha

by Marty Rhodes Figley, Cat Bowman Smith
     
 

Despite their very opposite personalities, Mary and Martha were able to recognize each other's virtues through the teachings of Jesus. In this humorous retelling, the two sisters are able to see their short-comings and learn to help each other. Children today will find comfort in this timeless story and learn to live with and enjoy their own siblings.See more details below

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Overview

Despite their very opposite personalities, Mary and Martha were able to recognize each other's virtues through the teachings of Jesus. In this humorous retelling, the two sisters are able to see their short-comings and learn to help each other. Children today will find comfort in this timeless story and learn to live with and enjoy their own siblings.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Karen Williams
When you open this book, you are struck with the illustrator's use of rich color. Bold primary colors are used in the illustrations and their frames. Throughout the book, the illustrations imply action and movement. The text, however, is problematic in that it takes far too much license with the Biblical story. Figley depicts Mary as a person who plays most of the time, and works only at the end of the story. Justification for this position is not warranted from the Biblical text on which this story is based (Luke 10:38-42). Consider also that, according to Figley, Mary likes to read interesting books. Historically, women of the first century were not educated. Nor were they taught to read. These inconsistencies make this book of questionable use as a New Testament storybook.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-This enlarged and modernized retelling of a Bible story from the book of Luke concerns two sisters of different temperaments. Martha the worker and worrier disapproves of Mary the dreamer and listener. Although both young women are hospitable when Jesus comes to visit, Mary's way appears to be the favored one-she is able to hear His teachings, while Martha is too busy. The theme and the questions it raises are comparable to Aesop's ``The Ant and the Grasshopper'' and to Leo Lionni's modern fable Frederick (Knopf, 1967). The cartoonlike illustrations are bold and lively, portraying earnest and gloomy Martha with her broom and sweet, lively Mary playing and reading books. This story would provide food for thought and discussion in Christian education collections, and may be of use in large public libraries.-Carolyn Jenks, First Parish Unitarian Church, Portland, ME
Shelley Townsend-Hudson
Figley presents a lively retelling of the biblical tale of Mary and Martha, a story seldom seen in picture-book form. We follow the daily activities of two very different sisters: Martha--always busy cleaning, cooking, and shopping--and Mary, who would rather read, write, strum the harp, and play hide-and-seek with the local children. When their friend Jesus comes to visit, their differences culminate in conflict: Martha resents Mary's listening to Jesus' teachings while Martha cleans and cooks. Jesus reminds her that seeking the life of the spirit is the better choice. In turn, Mary sees Martha's need for a break, and each girl eventually finds balance in life. Richly hued drawings enhance this bright and joyful interpretation, with Martha's world-weary cat and Mary's frolicking dog adding a nice bit of contrast.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802850799
Publisher:
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Publication date:
10/01/1995
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.28(w) x 10.26(h) x 0.35(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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