Mary Church Terrell: Leader for Equality

Mary Church Terrell: Leader for Equality

by Patricia C. McKissack, Fredrick L. McKissack
     
 
-- Elementary reading level biographies of inspiring African Americans.
-- Will satisfy the need for younger biographies written with simple text.
-- Each book contains a table of contents, a glossary, an index, and comfortably sized type.

Overview

-- Elementary reading level biographies of inspiring African Americans.
-- Will satisfy the need for younger biographies written with simple text.
-- Each book contains a table of contents, a glossary, an index, and comfortably sized type.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Mary Church Terrell was born during the Civil War, in Memphis, Tennessee. Her father, Robert, had been born a slave, but she was born free. He became a very wealthy businessman and Mary grew up as a child of privilege. In the 1870s, as Jim Crow laws were being enacted, Mary was sent to college in Ohio. Oberlin College was very unusual because it was integrated�men, women and African-Americans were educated together. Mary spent her life fighting for equal rights for blacks and women all over the world. She became the first president of the National Association of Colored Women, and joined the NAACP shortly after it was founded in 1909. She campaigned against the segregation of black soldiers during WWI and for the right of women to vote. In the early 1950s, in her eighties, Mary took part in sit-ins to protest segregation in the south. She died in 1954, shortly after schools were desegregated. There is a lot of information in the 27 large-print pages of the book, but some of it is found only in photo captions (in one instance, the caption contradicts the text) or in the timeline at the back of the book. Many readers may ignore the captions as well as the timeline, and will miss some interesting material. Although the McKissacks have long been lauded as outstanding authors, this may not be one of their best efforts. It provides, however, a solid informational base on which to build. Part of the "Great African-Americans" series.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-These revised biographies contain many facts presented in a readable style. While some of the material has been updated and expanded, the most striking difference is the visuals. For example, the mediocre drawings in the first edition of Douglass have been replaced with black-and-white archival photos and reproductions. The appealing cover is new and the typography has changed. The text, which recounts Douglass's experiences of being taken from his mother, becoming a slave, and suffering many beatings, help to put a human face on the evils of slavery. Children will gain insight into the power of literacy as they read the words of Douglass's master who said, "Never teach a slave to read.-He won't want to stay a slave." Terrell also relies heavily on black-and-white period photographs. Like Douglass, she also lived in the 19th century, but was born free into a life of privilege and wealth. However, Terrell also faced the obstacles placed before African Americans and fought to overcome them. She was active in African-American women's groups and the newly formed NAACP. Attractive replacements for libraries needing biographies for beginning chapter-book readers.- Dorothy N. Bowen, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780894903052
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/1991
Series:
Great African Americans Series
Edition description:
REVISED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 8.61(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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