Mary Reilly

Mary Reilly

3.3 6
by Valerie Martin
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

From the acclaimed author of the bestselling Italian Fever comes a fresh twist on the classic Jekyll and Hyde story, a novel told from the perspective of Mary Reilly, Dr. Jekyll's dutiful and intelligent housemaid.

Faithfully weaving in details from Robert Louis Stevenson's classic, Martin introduces an original and captivating character: Mary is a

Overview

From the acclaimed author of the bestselling Italian Fever comes a fresh twist on the classic Jekyll and Hyde story, a novel told from the perspective of Mary Reilly, Dr. Jekyll's dutiful and intelligent housemaid.

Faithfully weaving in details from Robert Louis Stevenson's classic, Martin introduces an original and captivating character: Mary is a survivor–scarred but still strong–familiar with evil, yet brimming with devotion and love. As a bond grows between Mary and her tortured employer, she is sent on errands to unsavory districts of London and entrusted with secrets she would rather not know. Unable to confront her hideous suspicions about Dr. Jekyll, Mary ultimately proves the lengths to which she'll go to protect him. Through her astute reflections, we hear the rest of the classic Jekyll and Hyde story, and this familiar tale is made more terrifying than we remember it, more complex than we imagined possible.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Brilliant.... A powerful and moving novel."?Los Angeles Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Mary Reilly, housemaid and devoted friend of Dr. Henry Jekyll, senses pk that something is dreadfully wrong with the weary and laboratory-obsessed scientist, who has hired Edward Hyde as his assistant. ``Spare and atmospheric, this story is a dark, absorbing symphony; Mary Reilly is an unforgettable character,'' PW said. (Mar.)
Library Journal
This retelling of the enigmatic Dr. Jekyll-Mr. Hyde tale deserves praise for suspense, character creation, and historical verisimilitude. Mary Reilly, a loyal, trusted servant in the household of Dr. Jekyll records in her diary the mysterious circumstances which lead to her Master's tragic fate. The hierarchy of social classes, relationships among servants and domestics, and details of language and dress enhance this marvelous re-creation with the realism of Dickens. Mary represents the apex of devotion, goodness, and honesty, in contrast to the dual nature and complexity of Dr. Jekyll, whose shadow side threatens to destroy all bounds of decency, law, and order. Less convincing is the tinge of romance between Mary and Jekyll. Most compelling is a forceful consciousness about the dual propensity of human nature and the awesome power which is ours. BOMC featured alternate; Quality Paperback Book Club selection. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 10/15/89.-- Addie Lee Bracy, Beaver Coll. Lib., Glenside, Pa.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375725999
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/10/2001
Series:
Vintage Contemporaries Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
359,314
Product dimensions:
5.19(w) x 7.97(h) x 0.59(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Mary Reilly 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anthrogrl More than 1 year ago
Stevenson's 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde' has been portrayed many times through various films, but Valerie Martin's novel takes a different viewpoint- through the eyes of Mary, Dr. Jekyll's housemaid. For those who have seen the film prior to reading, be warned that the book differs significantly on several important points. Martin's novel is original, thoughtful, and ultimately just as tragic as the original story. The reader can easily identify with Mary, who can't seem to shake off her sad past. Her relationship with Dr. Jekyll is not one of romance, but of shared unhappiness and tragedy. In Mary Dr. Jekyll sees a trustworthy servant, while Mary views the doctor as a virtuous man who can have no connection to her unhappy past. Martin does an excellent job of preserving the issues of morality and psychology that the orginal novel puts forth. I highly recommend this novel- you won't be disappointed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The movie is much better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago