MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT GREATEST WORKS [Authoritative and Unabridged NOOK Edition] The Bestselling Works by Mary Wollstonecraft Incl. A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMAN MARY, A FICTION MARIA OR THE WRONGS OF WOMAN & MORE! (NOOKBook Feminist Classics) [NOOK Book]

Overview

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT GREATEST WORKS
[Authoritative and Unabridged NOOK Edition]

The Bestselling Works by Mary Wollstonecraft
Incl....
See more details below
MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT GREATEST WORKS [Authoritative and Unabridged NOOK Edition] The Bestselling Works by Mary Wollstonecraft Incl. A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMAN MARY, A FICTION MARIA OR THE WRONGS OF WOMAN & MORE! (NOOKBook Feminist Classics)

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Overview

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT GREATEST WORKS
[Authoritative and Unabridged NOOK Edition]

The Bestselling Works by Mary Wollstonecraft
Incl. A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMAN | MARY, A FICTION | MARIA OR THE WRONGS OF WOMAN & MORE!

(NOOKBook Feminist Classics)


EXCERPT

"In the present state of society it appears necessary to go back to first principles in search of the most simple truths, and to dispute with some prevailing prejudice every inch of ground. To clear my way, I must be allowed to ask some plain questions, and the answers will probably appear as unequivocal as the axioms on which reasoning is built; though, when entangled with various motives of action, they are formally contradicted, either by the words or conduct of men.

In what does man’s pre-eminence over the brute creation consist? The answer is as clear as that a half is less than the whole; in Reason.

What acquirement exalts one being above another? Virtue; we spontaneously reply.

For what purpose were the passions implanted? That man by struggling with them might attain a degree of knowledge denied to the brutes; whispers Experience.

Consequently the perfection of our nature and capability of happiness, must be estimated by the degree of reason, virtue, and knowledge, that distinguish the individual, and direct the laws which bind society: and that from the exercise of reason, knowledge and virtue naturally flow, is equally undeniable, if mankind be viewed collectively.

The rights and duties of man thus simplified, it seems almost impertinent to attempt to illustrate truths that appear so incontrovertible; yet such deeply rooted prejudices have clouded reason, and such spurious qualities have assumed the name of virtues, that it is necessary to pursue the course of reason as it has been perplexed and involved in error, by various adventitious circumstances, comparing the simple axiom with casual deviations.

Men, in general, seem to employ their reason to justify prejudices, which they have imbibed, they can scarcely trace how, rather than to root them out. The mind must be strong that resolutely forms its own principles; for a kind of intellectual cowardice prevails which makes many men shrink from the task, or only do it by halves. Yet the imperfect conclusions thus drawn, are frequently very plausible, because they are built on partial experience, on just, though narrow, views.

Going back to first principles, vice skulks, with all its native deformity, from close investigation; but a set of shallow reasoners are always exclaiming that these arguments prove too much, and that a measure rotten at the core may be expedient. Thus expediency is continually contrasted with simple principles, till truth is lost in a mist of words, virtue, in forms, and knowledge rendered a sounding nothing, by the specious prejudices that assume its name.

That the society is formed in the wisest manner, whose constitution is founded on the nature of man, strikes, in the abstract, every thinking being so forcibly, that it looks like presumption to endeavour to bring forward proofs; though proof must be brought, or the strong hold of prescription will never be forced by reason; yet to urge prescription as an argument to justify the depriving men (or women) of their natural rights, is one of the absurd sophisms which daily insult common sense."


TABLE OF CONTENTS

MARY, A FICTION

A VINDICATION OF THE RIGHTS OF WOMAN
(WITH STRICTURES ON POLITICAL AND MORAL SUBJECTS)

LETTERS WRITTEN DURING A SHORT RESIDENCE IN SWEDEN, NORWAY AND DENMARK

MARIA
OR THE WRONGS OF WOMAN
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014637879
  • Publisher: The Complete Works Collection
  • Publication date: 6/25/2012
  • Series: The Complete Works Collection , #55
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 520,680
  • File size: 636 KB

Meet the Author

Mary Wollstonecraft (27 April 1759 – 10 September 1797) was an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Wollstonecraft is best known for A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), in which she argues that women are not naturally inferior to men, but appear to be only because they lack education. She suggests that both men and women should be treated as rational beings and imagines a social order founded on reason.

Until the late 20th century, Wollstonecraft's life, which encompassed several unconventional personal relationships, received more attention than her writing. After two ill-fated affairs, with Henry Fuseli and Gilbert Imlay (by whom she had a daughter, Fanny Imlay), Wollstonecraft married the philosopher William Godwin, one of the forefathers of the anarchist movement. Wollstonecraft died at the age of thirty-eight, ten days after giving birth to her second daughter, leaving behind several unfinished manuscripts. Her daughter Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, later Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, would become an accomplished writer herself.

After Wollstonecraft's death, her widower published a Memoir (1798) of her life, revealing her unorthodox lifestyle, which inadvertently destroyed her reputation for almost a century. However, with the emergence of the feminist movement at the turn of the twentieth century, Wollstonecraft's advocacy of women's equality and critiques of conventional femininity became increasingly important. Today Wollstonecraft is regarded as one of the founding feminist philosophers, and feminists often cite both her life and work as important influences.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    Required reading for anyone interested in feminism and the early

    Required reading for anyone interested in feminism and the early struggles.

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