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The Masked Bobwhite Rides Again
     

The Masked Bobwhite Rides Again

by John Alcock
 

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In this collection of thought-provoking essays, ecologist Alcock explores the complex relationship between the desert and its human inhabitants. Citing such examples as the abuse of land by livestock and the reintroduction of the masked bobwhite quail, he chronicles not only the changes wrought on the desert by people, but also the ability of the desert to

Overview


In this collection of thought-provoking essays, ecologist Alcock explores the complex relationship between the desert and its human inhabitants. Citing such examples as the abuse of land by livestock and the reintroduction of the masked bobwhite quail, he chronicles not only the changes wrought on the desert by people, but also the ability of the desert to recover and rejuvenate if given the chance.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Closely observed, delicate vignettes on Arizona's desert spaces. . . . In prose as quiet and spare as his subject, Alcock summons some extraordinarily evocative desert imagery. . . . The desert comes alive here as a glorious and enriching place. Show it some respect, Alcock advises, and it will pay you back in unimaginable ways."—Kirkus Reviews

"The essays can be amusing, but they are never supercilious, and welcome as amusement is in this era of ecological sanctimoniousness, Alcock subordinates humor to a curiosity informed by scientific tough-mindedness that empowers readers to respond reciprocally."—Booklist

Library Journal
Join Alcock on a tour of the Sonoran Desert and a trek along Usery Peak and Superstition Mountain in southeastern Arizona as he offers his observations of this remarkable desert ecosystem and its environs. In a series of essays, Alcock, a zoology professor at Arizona State University in Tempe and the author of several works on the Sonoran Desert, describes his encounters with saguaro cactus, kangaroo rats, army ants, termites, gnatcatchers, towhees, coyotes, black bears, warblers, and other flora and fauna and their behaviors and roles in the desert ecosystem. He discusses the history of settlement and growth in Arizona and the hostility of Anglo settlers toward Native Americans, which virtually destroyed the Arizona Apaches. Alcock is not kind to ranchers, whom he faults for causing ecological damage by grazing livestock on deserts and other public lands and for failing to understand the precarious balance of the desert. All readers will easily identify with Alcock's love of this land and wish they were there. Highly recommended.-- Irwin Weintraub, Rutgers Univ. Lib., Piscataway, N.J.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816514052
Publisher:
University of Arizona Press
Publication date:
09/01/1993
Pages:
186
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)

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