Mass Career Customization: Aligning the Workplace with Today's Nontraditional Workforce

Mass Career Customization: Aligning the Workplace with Today's Nontraditional Workforce

5.0 2
by Cathleen Benko, Anne Cicero Weisberg
     
 

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Far-reaching changes in attitudes and family structures have been redefining the workforce for more than two decades—yet the workplace has remained much the same. During this time, many companies have learned that personalizing the customer experience is good for business. In Mass Career Customization, the authors argue convincingly to extend this

Overview


Far-reaching changes in attitudes and family structures have been redefining the workforce for more than two decades—yet the workplace has remained much the same. During this time, many companies have learned that personalizing the customer experience is good for business. In Mass Career Customization, the authors argue convincingly to extend this popular and profitable concept to the workplace.

This book is centered on the powerful insight that career options in today’s economy need to accommodate the rising and falling phases of employee engagement as it changes over time. The remarkable process unveiled in this book offers choices involving four important dimensions of career progression: role; pace; location and schedule; and workload.

As the working population shrinks, maintaining industry advantage will depend largely on keeping employees engaged and connected. Mass career customization provides a framework for organizational adaptability that will do just that.

Editorial Reviews

U.S. News and World Report
Mass Career Customization personalizes employees' careers to fit their lifestyles.

The Financial Times
There is much to commend this book.

November HR Magazine
Forget the corporate ladder. Employees at all levels are increasingly on a "corporate lattice" that lets them move up, sideways and even down as needed . . .

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422110331
Publisher:
Harvard Business Review Press
Publication date:
09/17/2007
Pages:
230
Sales rank:
622,861
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author


Cathleen Benko is Deloitte's Managing Principal of Talent and Lead Client Service Principal for a major technology client. She previously authored Connecting the Dots: Aligning Projects and Objectives in Unpredictable Times.

Anne Weisberg is a senior adviser to Deloitte's Women's Initiative.

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Mass Career Customization: Aligning the Workplace with Today's Nontraditional Workforce 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
The American workforce has changed dramatically since the 1960s. Today, only 17% of households consist of a father who works and a mother who stays home, challenging the underlying assumptions behind workplace success. How can companies attract and retain an ever-shrinking pool of skilled talent just as employees are redefining what it means to fit work into life and life into work? Deloitte executive Cathleen Benko and former executive Anne Weisberg say companies must abandon the traditional notion of a corporate ladder – on which you can only go up or step off – in favor of a new metaphor, the “corporate lattice,” which views career paths across a grid – instead of a ladder – allowing for growth along varied paths. getAbstract recommends this book’s solutions to senior managers and strategists charged with attracting, retaining and advancing a highly productive workforce, to those stuck on or off the corporate ladder, and to those who guide employees through career transitions and growth.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I strongly recommend this timely and instructive book to all those involved in developing talent in professional service firms or any business seeking to hire, retain and prepare their younger employees for leadership. Although much of the book discusses methods for retaining and promoting women, who now make up half of the graduates of our finest universities and grad schools, it also has great applicability to Gen X and Y men, many of whom would prefer to have part-time schedules and are as likely as women to work some hours from home. In place of the more widely accepted, rigid up and down, ¿all or nothing¿ ladder, the authors advocate a more flexible, option-providing lattice as a model for the workplace. Berko and Weisberg convincingly show that the lattice, or MCC, much better accommodates what they call the ¿sine curve¿ of a modern career ¿ the different periods where employees can dedicate varying amounts of time to advancing within their firms. The authors demonstrate that flexible work arrangements, such as permitting young mothers to ¿ramp up¿ after a maternity leave, are an incomplete substitute for a more comprehensive process that meets the interests of employees to modify and adjust workloads, where that work is performed and the opportunity to customize their careers to closely match their long-term objectives. Only a career-long methodology will address the overriding interests of the organization to hire and keep their best talent while providing enough flexibility, not just in dealing with maternity leave, but over a several decade career path. The book is particularly helpful because it provides the reader with a framework for implementing MCC and case studies showing how well-respected firms have successfully customized MCC to recruit and retain their highly regarded employees while broadening their leadership pool.