Mass Dictatorship and Modernity

Overview

As a twentieth century phenomenon, mass dictatorship developed its own modern socio-political engineering system which sought to achieve the self-mobilization of the masses for radical state projects. In this sense, it shares a similar mobilization mechanism with its close cousin, mass democracy. Mass dictatorship requires the modern platform of the public sphere to spread its clarion call for the masses to realize their lofty utopian visions. Far from being a phenomenon that emerged from pre-modern despotic ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $78.51   
  • New (4) from $78.51   
  • Used (5) from $78.59   
Mass Dictatorship and Modernity

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$100.00
BN.com price

Overview

As a twentieth century phenomenon, mass dictatorship developed its own modern socio-political engineering system which sought to achieve the self-mobilization of the masses for radical state projects. In this sense, it shares a similar mobilization mechanism with its close cousin, mass democracy. Mass dictatorship requires the modern platform of the public sphere to spread its clarion call for the masses to realize their lofty utopian visions. Far from being a phenomenon that emerged from pre-modern despotic practices, mass dictatorship reflects the global proliferation of quintessential modernist assumptions about the transformability of the individual and society through collective effort. Mass dictatorship therefore utilizes the utmost modern practices to form totalitarian cohesion and to stage public spectacles in the search for extremist solutions to a society's problems. The contributors examine the phenomenon of mass dictatorship along many different lines of inquiry, both theoretical as well as empirical in disparate locations around the globe including Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Interwar Austria, Imperial Japan, Colonial Korea, Colonial Taiwan, Stalinist Russia, Maoist China, and North Korea.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Michael Kim is Associate Professor of Korean History at Yonsei University's Graduate School of International Studies in Seoul, Korea. His research primarily focuses on colonial Korea, and he has published numerous articles and book chapters on urban culture, print culture, Korean collaborators, migration and wartime mobilization.

Michael Schoenhals is Professor of Chinese at the Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Sweden. He has published extensively on the social and political history of modern China, including most recently Spying for the People: Mao's Secret Agents, 1949–1967 (2012). He is co-founder of the Forum för literaturens offentligheter (FOLIO), a Swedish interdisciplinary academic forum bringing together researchers interested in exploring how writers and constellations of readers emerge as actors in public settings by attempting to employ literature and literary works for non-literary purposes.

Yong-Woo Kim is Senior Researcher at Ewha University's Institute of World and Global History, Korea. He has published a number of articles on French and Italian Fascism. He is the author of Homo Fascistus: French Fascism and Cultural Revolution of Counter-Revolutionaries (in Korean) and the co-editor of the 'Mass Dictatorship' Series published in Korean.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
1. Introduction: Mass Dictatorship and the Radical Project for Modernity; M.Kim & M.Schoenhals
PART I: RADICAL PROJECTS FOR MODERNIZATION
2. Mass Dictatorship as a Transnational Formation of Modernity; J.Lim
3. Mass Dictatorship and the 'Modernist State'; R.Griffin
4. Nebulous Nexus: Modernity and Perlustration in Maoist China; M.Schoenhals
5. Staging the Police: Visual Presentation and Everyday Coloniality; H.C.Ts'ai
PART II: THE PUBLIC SPHERE AND MASS DICTATORSHIP
6. Habermas, Fascism and the Public Sphere; P.Corner
7. Total War Mobilization and Transformation of the National Public Sphere in Japan, 1931-1945; K.H.Kim
8. Between Liberalism and National Socialism: The Historical Role of Voluntary Firemen Associations in Austria as a Public Sphere; H.Mizuno
9. Colonial Publicness as Metaphor; H.Yun
10. The Colonial Public Sphere and the Discursive Mechanism of Mindo; M.Kim
PART III: MODERN SUBJECTIFICATION AND AGENCY
11. Models of Selfhood and Subjectivity: The Soviet Case in Historical Perspective; C.Chatterjee & K.Petrone
12. The End of the Weimar Republic: Individual Agency, Germany's 'Old Elites' and the 'Crisis of Classical Modernity'; P.Lambert
13. Total, Thus Broken: Chuch'e Sasang and North Korea's Terrain of Subjectivity; C.Kim
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)