Master and Commander

( 102 )

Overview

This, the first in the splendid series of Jack Aubrey novels, establishes the friendship between Captain Aubrey, Royal Navy, and Stephen Maturin, ship's surgeon and intelligence agent, against the thrilling backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. Details of life aboard a man-of-war in Nelson's navy are faultlessly rendered: the conversational idiom of the officers in the ward room and the men on the lower deck, the food, the floggings, the mysteries of the wind and the rigging, and the road of broadsides as the great ...
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Master and Commander (Vol. Book 1) (Aubrey/Maturin Novels)

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Overview

This, the first in the splendid series of Jack Aubrey novels, establishes the friendship between Captain Aubrey, Royal Navy, and Stephen Maturin, ship's surgeon and intelligence agent, against the thrilling backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. Details of life aboard a man-of-war in Nelson's navy are faultlessly rendered: the conversational idiom of the officers in the ward room and the men on the lower deck, the food, the floggings, the mysteries of the wind and the rigging, and the road of broadsides as the great ships close in battle.
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Editorial Reviews

New York Times
[O’Brian’s] Aubrey-Maturin series, 20 novels of the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic Wars, is a masterpiece. It will outlive most of today’s putative literary gems as Sherlock Holmes has outlived Bulwer-Lytton, as Mark Twain has outlived Charles Reade.— David Mamet
Washington Post
The Aubrey-Maturin series… far beyond any episodic chronicle, ebbs and flows with the timeless tide of character and the human heart.— Ken Ringle
Chicago Sun-Times
There is not a writer alive whose work I value over his.— Stephen Becker
New York Times Book Review
The best historical novels ever written… On every page Mr. O’Brian reminds us with subtle artistry of the most important of all historical lessons: that times change but people don’t, that the griefs and follies and victories of the men and women who were here before us are in fact the maps of our own lives.— Richard Snow
Cutler Durkee - People
“[The series shows] a joy in language that jumps from every page…you're in for a wonderful voyage.”
Stephen Becker
“Certain authors we read because they enlarge us, because they offer experience, wisdom, beauty of language, a sense of fate and the only defense, a sense of humor…To compare Patrick O'Brian with 'writers of sea stories' is to compare Proust to the 'Orchard Fancier's Quarterly'. O'Brian is literature. I am one of your surly pragmatical polyglot landlubbers, and I read him and reread him with awe and gratitude. His Aubrey-Maturin volumes are in effect one great book, and if I could keep only a half a dozen contemporary writers, O'Brian would be one of them.”
Slate
I devoured Patrick O’Brian’s 20-volume masterpiece as if it had been so many tots of Jamaica grog.— Christopher Hitchens
Irish Times
Some of you...have never read a Patrick O'Brian novel. I beseech you to start now. Start with Master and Commander, which should be available in paperback from your nearest bookseller. And if he—or she—does not have a copy, then beat the wretched fellow.— Kevin Myers
New Republic
Patrick O’Brian is unquestionably the Homer of the Napoleonic wars.
Christopher Hitchens - Slate
“I devoured Patrick O’Brian’s 20-volume masterpiece as if it had been so many tots of Jamaica grog.”
A. S. Byatt
“Gripping and vivid… a whole, solidly living world for the imagination to inhabit.”
George Will
“O’Brian’s Aubrey-Maturin volumes actually constitute a single 6,443-page novel, one that should have been on those lists of the greatest novels of the 20th century.”
Kevin Myers - Irish Times
“Some of you...have never read a Patrick O'Brian novel. I beseech you to start now. Start with Master and Commander, which should be available in paperback from your nearest bookseller. And if he—or she—does not have a copy, then beat the wretched fellow.”
James Hamilton-Paterson - New Republic
“Patrick O’Brian is unquestionably the Homer of the Napoleonic wars.”
Keith Richards
“I fell in love with his writing straightaway, at first with Master and Commander. It wasn’t primarily the Nelson and Napoleonic period, more the human relationships. …And of course having characters isolated in the middle of the goddamn sea gives more scope. …It’s about friendship, camaraderie. Jack Aubrey and Stephen Maturin always remind me a bit of Mick and me.”
Tamar Lewin - New York Times
“It has been something of a shock to find myself—an inveterate reader of girl books—obsessed with Patrick O’Brian’s Napoleonic-era historical novels… What keeps me hooked are the evolving relationships between Jack and Stephen and the women they love.”
David Mamet - New York Times
“[O’Brian’s] Aubrey-Maturin series, 20 novels of the Royal Navy in the Napoleonic Wars, is a masterpiece. It will outlive most of today’s putative literary gems as Sherlock Holmes has outlived Bulwer-Lytton, as Mark Twain has outlived Charles Reade.”
Ken Ringle - Washington Post
“The Aubrey-Maturin series… far beyond any episodic chronicle, ebbs and flows with the timeless tide of character and the human heart.”
Stephen Becker - Chicago Sun-Times
“There is not a writer alive whose work I value over his.”
Martin Levin - New York Times Book Review
“Re-creates with delightful subtlety, the flavor of life aboard a midget British man-of-war plying the western Mediterranean in the year 1800, a year of indecisive naval skirmishes with France and Spain. Even for a reader not especially interested in matters nautical, the author's easy command of the philosophical, political, sensual and social temper of the times flavors a rich entertainment.”
Richard Snow - New York Times Book Review
“The best historical novels ever written… On every page Mr. O’Brian reminds us with subtle artistry of the most important of all historical lessons: that times change but people don’t, that the griefs and follies and victories of the men and women who were here before us are in fact the maps of our own lives.”
E. O. Wilson - Boston Globe
“I haven’t read novels [in the past ten years] except for all of the Patrick O’Brian series. It was, unfortunately, like tripping on heroin. I started on those books and couldn’t stop.”
Sir Francis Chichester
The best sea story I have ever read.
Observer
Patrick O’Brian can put a spark of character into the sawdust of time.
New York Times
The best historical novels ever written.
The New Yorker
“They're funny, they're exciting, they're informative. There are legions of us who gladly ship out time and time again under Captain Aubrey.”
Los Angeles Times
“It has been said that this series is some of the finest historical fiction of our time . . . . Aubrey and Maturin have been described as better than Holmes and Watson, the equal of Quixote and Panza . . . . All this is true.
And the marvel is, it hardly says enough.”
Richard Snow - New York Times Book Review
“The best historical novels ever written.”
Boston Globe
“I haven’t read novels [in the past ten years] except for all of the Patrick O’Brian series. It was, unfortunately, like tripping on heroin. I started on those books and couldn’t stop.”— E. O. Wilson
E. O. Wilson - Boston Globe
“I haven’t read novels [in the past ten years] except for all of the Patrick O’Brian series. It was, unfortunately, like tripping on heroin. I started on those books and couldn’t stop.”
People
“You're in for a wonderful voyage.”
People
“You're in for a wonderful voyage.”
Time
“If Jane Austen had written rousing sea yarns, she would have produced something very close to the prose of Patrick O'Brian.”
Los Angeles Times Book Review
“O'Brian is a novelist, pure and simple, one of the best that we have.”
John Bayley - New York Review of Books
“A world of enchanting fictional surfaces.”
Terry Teachout - New York Times Book Review
“Taken as a whole, the Aubrey-Maturin novels are by a long shot the best things of their kind... they are uniquely excellent.”
Donald Graham - Wall Street Journal
“If there were seventeen more novels, I'd start today.”
Observer
“Patrick O'Brian can put a spark of character into the sawdust of time.”
Katherine A. Powers - Atlantic Monthly
“One does not get many pages into the Aubrey-Maturin sequence before falling under the spell of O'Brian's prose, which is... elegantly paced, quietly witty.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393307054
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/28/1990
  • Series: Aubrey-Maturin Series , #1
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 112,525
  • Product dimensions: 8.20 (w) x 5.38 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

Patrick O'Brian
In addition to twenty volumes in the highly respected Aubrey/Maturin series, Patrick O'Brian's many books include Testimonies, The Golden Ocean, and The Unknown Shore. O'Brian also wrote acclaimed biographies of Pablo Picasso and Sir Joseph Banks and translated many works from the French, among them the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Lacouture's biographies of Charles de Gaulle. He passed away in January 2000 at the age of 85.

Biography

In addition to the twenty volumes of the highly-respected Aubrey/Maturin series, Patrick O'Brian's many novels include Testimonies, The Golden Ocean, and The Unknown Shore. O'Brian has also written acclaimed biographies of Pablo Picasso and Sir Joseph Banks and has translated many works from the French, among them the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Lacouture's biography of Charles de Gaulle. Born in 1914, he passed away in January 2000.

Patrick O'Brian was one of the great authors of the twentieth century, whose novels were often compared by critics to the work of Jane Austen and even Homer. A writer of breathtaking erudition, Mr. O'Brian evoked in complete and dazzling detail an entire world -- that of the British Navy during the Napoleonic Wars. In addition to formidable scholarship, Mr. O'Brian brought to his work keen psychological insights, a sharp wit, and fast-paced, heart-stopping action.

In a cover story in The New York Times Book Review published on January 6, 1991, nine years to the day before Mr. O'Brian's death, Richard Snow wrote that Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin naval adventure novels are "the best historical novels ever written. On every page Mr. O'Brian reminds us with subtle artistry of the most important of all historical lessons: that times change but people don't, that the griefs and follies and victories of the men and women who were here before us are in fact the maps of our own lives." In a Washington Post article published August 2, 1992, Ken Ringle wrote, "The Aubrey/Maturin series far beyond any episodic chronicle, ebbs and flows with the timeless tide of character and the human heart."

W.W. Norton & Company began publishing Patrick O'Brian's books in 1990. The previous year, Norton's editor-in-chief, Starling Lawrence, had read The Reverse of the Medal on a trans-Atlantic flight, fallen hard for the series, and had become convinced that Norton ought to publish Mr. O'Brian's works in the U.S. Norton decided to publish each new book in hardcover as it was completed and to bring out the earlier books in the series in paperback until they had caught up. The first season, Norton published The Letter of Marque (# 12) in hardcover and Master and Commander (# 1) and Post Captain (# 2) in paperback. Most recently, Norton published Blue at the Mizzen (# 20) in hardcover in 1999 and in paperback in 2000. At present, Norton has all of the books in the series available in uniform hardcover and paperback editions.

In addition to the twenty books in the Aubrey/Maturin series, Norton has published a short story collection (The Rendezvous and Other Stories) and three of Mr. O'Brian's other novels: Testimonies, The Golden Ocean, and The Unknown Shore. O'Brian has also written acclaimed biographies of Pablo Picasso and Sir Joseph Banks and has translated many works from the French, among them the novels and memoirs of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Lacouture's biography of Charles de Gaulle. In April of 2000, Norton published Caesar: The Life Story of a Panda-Leopard, his very first book, begun when he was just twelve, and Hussein: An Entertainment, written when he was about twenty years old. Both of these books had long been out of print.

Starting in the early 1990s, Mr. O'Brian achieved, at long last, the critical and popular recognition that was his due. All of his new books published since 1993 have appeared on national bestseller charts, and his books have sold well over three million copies in the U.S. alone.

Mr. O'Brian once said, "Obviously, I have lived very much out of the world: I know little of present-day Dublin or London or Paris, even less of post-modernity, post-structuralism, hard rock or rap, and I cannot write with much conviction about the contemporary scene." [Patrick O'Brian: Critical Essays and a Bibliography, edited by Arthur Cunningham]. In fact, Mr. O'Brian often seemed to have walked out of another era, and in his interactions with his publisher, he displayed a level of courtesy and civility rarely seen in our times.

Author biography courtesy of W.W. Norton & Company.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Richard Patrick Russ
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 12, 1914
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chalfont St. Peter, Buckinghamshire
    1. Date of Death:
      January 2, 2000
    2. Place of Death:
      Dublin, Ireland

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 102 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(62)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 102 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 12, 2009

    Fantastic book

    While I understand and (to a limited extent) sympathize with some of the negative ratings this book has received, this is fast becoming my favorite series and I'm only on Book 7(?) The Surgeon's Mate.

    There were occasional stretches of narrative that I only dimly understood, filled with 18th Century nautical terminology like "leeward", "close-hauled", etc. Some of this I am only now beginning to grasp, some I'm still clueless on. I simply read it through as best I could, happy for those who did understand it. Knowing all the fine points of sailing that O'Brien mentions undoubtedly enriches the reading experience, but it is by no means necessary. Three pages of text can either have you running to a dictionary, Google, etc. etc. every other word in frustration as one of the previous reviewers mentioned, or you can just plow through it to get the gist - something like "After a day-long chase, Aubrey was able to bring the French ship to battle by his ingenious method of cross-bracing."

    The point is, the rest of the novel is so astoundingly good that to get hung up on not being able to follow all the nautical minutiae and jargon of the period is to miss the forest for the tree (lack of plural intentional). Each book seems better than the last, but I'm not sure if that's due to the books getting better, my being able to appreciate each one more, or some combination of both.

    There is a reason that this series has been given such effusive praise, and it's not because those lauding it take delight in luring in and vexing unsuspecting readers: It's just that good.

    13 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 14, 2010

    At the pace of the wind...

    This is beautifully written and is much more than simply a series of sea adventures due to the skill and depth of the author whose fascination is with the relationships between the characters involved rather than simply writing about dashing heroes in heroic engagements.

    The latter is there, certainly, but O'Brian quickly saw that he had an ideal setting in which to examine characters and their relationships by placing his characters into the narrow confines of the British warships of the period - the Napoleonic Wars. The series covers the period from about 1796 to the start of the 1820s.

    His first five or so novels in the series are based on engagements that actually took place, his research including reading the logs kept by the Captains involved.

    As inspiration for Captain Aubrey, he no doubt focused on the real life hero Lord Cochrane - you might also enjoy reading about him and his life.

    Aubrey befriends a young physician, Materin, who is half Irish and half Catalonian, both peoples subjected by conquering powers - the English and the Spanish. Materin longs for Irish independence from England, but he abhors Napoleon even more.

    It takes O'Brian about three books to begin to truly realize the depth and potential of his characters. Materin is revealed as a naturalist of note, a secret spy for the Navy against the French and her allies, and a man of great depth but with a violent core which makes him, when fully aroused, a ferocious enemy.

    Aubrey, in keeping with much actual history, is a brilliant and "scientific" captain, quite adept at math, grinding lenses to make his own telescopes, a fierce and fearless fighter asea -- but often oftimes quite lost ashore, gullible, and with many of the traditional weaknesses of the sailors who sometimes spent years away from home on their adventures and for whom their ties and vows existed not very far beyond the shores of their own homes.... Materin, in contrast, is a force truly to be reckoned with ashore, but is ever in danger of stepping wrong and drowning at sea.

    Illustrating their characters, Aubrey plays the violin, and plays it quite well, whereas Materin's instrument is the cello, with its deeper and perhaps more mysterious tones.

    Women, as characters, don't really enter the series until the third book or so, and it helps to keep in mind that O'Brian is taking a long view of things and is quite content to take three books to actually develop his female characters.

    The writing is excellent, the characters interesting, events do occur to carry things along, but they move at the pace of the wind, this being the age of sailing ships. You will near the end of each volume saying to yourself there's no way he can resolve this situation in the few pages remaining, it must carry on to the next volume, but each book is complete unto itself - in every case he wraps the story up and finishes it, then plants the seeds for the next book in the series.

    i found them calming, satisfying, a view into a different age. And during the series, O'Brian takes you on journeys to various areas around the world at that time.

    Enjoyable and with 20 books in the series, lots of chances to continue to follow characters you come to know and appreciate.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2009

    Master and Commander: The Siren Song of the Greatest Adventure Series Ever

    Master and Commander is the siren song fo the greatest adventure series ever--the Aubrey Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian. Read this at your peril, for you will be swept into a world of 20 books and at least two essential companion guides that will make the arcane world of the 19th century British Navy a key part of your everyday life. Absolute reading pleasure!

    Enjoy!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2012

    Unabashed recommendation

    First, ignore all of the hateful reviews. If you are seeking this or any of O'Brian's novels, then you know you are going to enjoy it. The HUGE advantage of the Nook copy is the instant dictionary, which solves the jargon/lingo issue.

    Captain Jack and Stephen form such a strong dynamic that you want the next book immediately. The comparison to Horatio Hornblower is fair but the authors had different purposes. Again, give this series a fair chance.

    Be warned: you will want an atlas and history book to know locations and the historical references.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Defining Naval Fiction Starts Here...

    O'Brian's Aubrey-Maturin naval series is a true classic. The underappreciated film led me to this book, and I am ever so glad it did! You can almost feel the salty sea-spray while reading this fine novel. No other author can conjure up life aboard a man-of-war as O'Brian. You will not be disappointed with this book or the entire series. Buy this book!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 30, 2009

    Master and Commander - The Aubrey-Maturin Series

    This book will press-gang you into the early 1800's at sea with the Royal Navy and it will be a decidedly better experience than that for those who really were pressed into service. It is the first of 20 novels (they do come in a 5-volume set) whose detail and adventure have yet to be equalled in historical fiction. Make sure to get the companion book, "A Sea of Words" by Dean King. It acts as a 500 page glossary for the myriad details of life at sea and ashore in the time of King George found it the 5 volume set the series becomes.

    The most amazing thing is that all 5 volumes are page turners from the first. The characters are well drawn, the history is,by and large (a sailing term, you will learn), accurately portrayed and the detail is truly extraordinary.

    If you have enjoyed Horatio Hornblower, this is an absolute must. It's Hornblower on steriods.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Not Bad

    I enjoyed this novel, though not as much as Forester's Hornblower ones. Between Aubrey and Hornoblower the latter is more open to the reader. He is more thoughtful and human, possessing sentiments, worries, and confusions that one easily empathizes with. He is a deeply sympathetic character, a little bit more so than the braggadicio and excessive volubility of Aubrey.<BR/><BR/>Especially enjoyable in this work was the character of Dr. Maturin, whose blanket ignorance of all things nautical and his starkly different personality from Aubrey's place him in the position of representing the reader in the plot.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    This series has it all

    Once you get used to the mind-boggling ship jargon and quick paced action sequences, you'll guzzle this series down like a pumpkin-spice latte (and the best part is, it's good for you and you don't even know it!) O'Brian is a masterful writer who can tackle everything partaining to the era: music, scientific theory, politics, and of course, NAVAL SRATEGY. Not only is he a great historian; he is also Austenian regarding his characters. Stephen Maturin and Jack Aubrey have a constantly ameliorating relationship that is the basis of the books. Every character O'Brian writes is so REAL, so tangible, that I've fallen in love with most (despite their glorious faults) and love to hate the rest. <BR/><BR/>The best way to sum up the books is with something my sister said to me after I'd been ranting about my favorite parts of a later book:<BR/><BR/>"You should read these more often. They put you in a good mood".

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2012

    Read the entire series.

    Start now.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2008

    Not blown away

    There is something to be said for an author who understands that while 75% of the globe is water, only 10% of the Earth's population has ever sailed on it. In other words, trying to at least make an attempt to bring people into a read by lowering the hurdles they have to face in ship terminology, 18th century lingo and history (somewhere at the end of this book there should be a treatise on how one should tie a sheep shank knot). If you want a good read, but want to skip over every other arcane spelling and odd phrase (perhaps a well placed asterisk and corresponding notation of what a word meant would not be out of place here) then this is the book for you. I like the quirky characters, but it took me until after the first third of the book that I was able to generally follow what was going on. There's no doubt that the author put in the time needed for research, (rich details indeed) but his dedication to putting every single detail possible into one passage slowed the plot down to a plod. At various times the dialog read as if the characters were doing serious readings from a Monty Python script or had a mouthful of novacaine. I'm sorry, I really looked forward to reading this book. But for me, this is one occasion where the screen writer of a film cut to the chase and mined the original text creating something better. Get the DVD and try something else. And I thought I'd never say that.

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2008

    Sublimely rewards persistence

    This is a difficult book to start. It took me two tries before O'Brian's quirky style really became engrossing, but I cannot sufficiently express the delight that awaits the persistent reader. That said, I would not recommend M&C to those unacquainted with naval history or the period in general. Though loath to own it, I read most of the Alexander Kent series first. Despite being a poor writer and no historian Kent's shallow facile treatment provided a useful basis to understand the uncompromising but realistic complexity of O'Brian's books. After reading the whole Aubrey/Maturin series three and four times apeice, M&C is still my favorite. O'Brian's ability to transform years of research and study, volumes of cold, formal dispatches and logbooks into vividly evocative literature is particularly remarkable. For those who appreciate O'Brian's painstaking historicity, unadorned characters, and striking unique prose, this is perhaps the purest and most rewarding of the series. For those who don't, well, there's always Kent.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2008

    A reviewer

    I can't believe the negative review I just read re: Master and Commander. I've read all 21 books except the first--Master and Commander. For some reason I started with book #2 and ate up the series for a period of over a year--relishing every adventure. O'Brian's gift for bringing characters off the page is out of this world. Maybe the first attempt sucked, I don't know, but as an author and an age of sail fan, PLEASE give this series a chance if the first book doesn't bite you. It will take you wonderful places and made you do something not many books do anymore...think. No, you won't always like Aubrey and some of the choices he makes, and Maturin may strike you as an odd duck, but that's what makes these two characters so human and where O'Brian deserves his accolades-not to mention his gift for educating us landlubbers about life aboard a man-o-war and world history. I can't 'fathom' not falling madly in love with this series and recommend skipping #1 and starting with #2. Sound gushy? O'Brian's work changed my life in many ways. I took up age of sail research, wrote my third novel, got my scuba certification and have traveled to the Caribbean twice. I plan to go to England in a couple years and pursue my genealogy and learn more about one of the greatest naval histories on earth. So there!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2007

    Tedious beyond bearing

    I have read the hype on this author and -- shame on me -- I bought into it. O'Brian clearly had literary aspirations (terribly envious of Tolkien, IMHO) and for those who think he achieved them, I salute you. You clearly have a greater stomach for pretentious tripe than I do. Pacing: None. Characterization: Who could admire a crude creature like Aubrey, whose sole virtue is his sailing skill? As for Maturin, if he came to a dinner party I would have to shoot him just to liven the place up. Symbolism: None. Dialogue: Contrived. Not even Jane Austen's Bennett family talked like this. Action: Detached, uninvolved. Theme: Missing one. Ah, but give the author an A+ for Literary Aspiration and if your idea of that is to abandon any plot, liberally sprinkle your prose with foreign phrases, Latin botanical and zoological terms, use the most obscure words in the OED, convolute your sentences, eliminate transitional phrases, and in general condescend to your readers, then you, too, could achieve the same literary heights as this Pretender. This is not literature. It isn't even good nautical fiction.

    1 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2003

    I am in danger of prehaps becoming addicted.

    I saw the movie, and instantly went for the book. (My apologies for being ignorant of it until my cinematic experience.) Only then I found out that there was an entire series - 20 books, in fact. Well, I read this first one, thoroughly enjoyed it, recommend it to anyone who appreciates a dynamic tale to take the mind away to better times, and can't wait to expand my O'Brian collection. My only qualm - if you are expecting to find a wise, grave-yet-cheerful, charming Aubrey, as portrayed in the film, you might be disappointed by the written character - a slightly ignorant, sometimes drunken childish being. But perhaps you'll find him charming, in his own way.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2014

    To:valary

    Continue the story.dont leave poeple is supence.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    Momo

    Im here....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2014

    Epicness

    A Pokemon doesn't just give up, and they usually don't things on thier own. But I like it anyway :3

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    Valeries story chapter six

    Ghetis stepped aside to reveal a pokemon i had never seen before. Ghetis chuckled again and said "Do you even know what pokemon this is? Its kyurem one of the most powerful pokemon alive! Lets battle whoever wins keeps zorroark forever." I stood there for a moment carefully considering what i should do. If i lost i would lose my best friend forever. However if i won ghetis would release zorroark and i could happily eat cherri berries with it. I decided to battle him. "Articuno youre up" i said. Articuno spread its wings out and screeched. Ghetis let kyurem out of its cage and turned to me. "Articuno use brave bird!" I called. Ghetis told kyurem to dodge it but it was too late. Articuno slammed into kyurem knocking it over. Ghetis muttered something i couldnt hear then her told kyurem to use roar. For some reason articuno went back in its ball. I didnt know what was going on so i just let out mewtwo. Kyurem used ice beam but without me telling it to mewtwo dodged and used psybeam. "Hey!" I said to mewtwo "i didnt tell you to do that!" Mewtwo apoligized then waited for me. I told mewtwo to use fly. Mewtwo stared at me then asked me what the heck i was talking about. Kyurem stopped attacking and fell over. Ghetis told me that i had won because kyurem no longer wanted to battle. But then he said "Zorroark is free." I said good then i put mewtwo back in its ball then let out articuno. I climbed onto its back then flew down to zorroarks cage. The cage was open now so zorroark just went on. On our way down i saw blaine nurse joy and jason waving at me! When we landed jason said something that shocked me he said "You know what you can keep articuno it likes you more then it likes me" i nodded as fast as i could then smiled at articuno. But i didnt know know the danger aahead of me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2014

    I give up. Please read comments

    Valerie. Take some if my freaking advice and fix your story. If you want detail ho to the previous result. But for now: <p> 100% awful 0% sense. Your story is...stupid. no offence. But it is. Exhibit A. Zoruark teaches a girl pokemon laguage immediatly. Wouldn't happen. Exhibit B. There are no BANANAS in pokemon. Exhibit C. A random man won't walk up to a little girl & have her fight a mewtwo. Exhibit D. Mewtwo is not a pokemon that would EVER be found in the wild. Exhibit E. The guy with the articuno. A pokemon way more powerful than zoruark. Makes the four year old fight the mewtwo. Exhibit F. Zoruark & mewteo are not found in the same region Exhibit G. YOU ARE FREAKING FOUR YEARS OLD! Exhibit H. The four year old understands whats going on. Exhibit I. The four year old catches mewtwo with a regular pokeball. Not possible. Exhibit J. The person i care so less about i forgot their name as well as evertone elses names threatens the four year old. Exhibit K. Nurse Joy is satidfued with a four year old wandering around by herself. Exhibit L. Kyruem isn't in the same region as mewtwo ir articuno Exhibit M. Kyruem is huge & could easily break out of a cage. Exhibit N. Kyruem doesn't just stop wanting to battle in the middle of the battle Exhibit O. If kyruem kept attacking the whole time as stated by you saying that they quit attacking than mewtwo would have been defeated by then. Exhibit P. Nobody saw any of this happen? Exhibit Q. Parents randomly give a zoruark a two year old. Exhibit R. Zoruark manages to keep the child alive for two years with no knowledge of how humans live if what they need to survive Exhibit S. The four year old is being challenged by over 20 year olds Exhibit T. There has not been a single not rare or not legendary pokemon. Exhibit U. A mon GIVES a FOUR YEAR OLD a LEGENDARY POKEMON. Exhibit V. I'm pretty sure Kyruem doesn't know roar... or atleast mine in black & in white 2 doesn't. Exhibit W. Kyruem won't randomly attack. It was in a cage. It would most like attack the person who put it there. Exhibit X. Where did the cage with the kyruem come from? Did it magically appear or did he have it so well hidden out in the open that everyone didnt notice. Exhibit Y. The four year old is made that mewtwo attacked and did damage. Exhibit Z. You taught her about what moves pokemon can use. About how to battle? Huh? I'm out of alphabet but i can think of a lot more things to say. S<_>tupid horrible disgracing shameful pokemon noob. The previous result has some broght sides but i'm not in the mood to share them now. Somehow your storues have only gotten worse. You as a pokemon. Maybe Magikarp. With an everstone so not cant evolve. Useless. Or grimer or muk. Disgusting. Have a good day...>:( <br> - &alpha VERY &alpha<_>ngry pokemon f&alpha<_>n

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2014

    slow - way to much detail

    sailing 101 - cannot relate to the level of detail. no plot.

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