Master Harold... and the Boys (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Master Harold... and the Boys (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

4.4 5
by Athol Fugard
     
 

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An argument between Master Harold, a seventeen-year-old South African, and Sam, the black man employed at Harold's mother's restaurant, makes them reevaluate their friendship.

Overview

An argument between Master Harold, a seventeen-year-old South African, and Sam, the black man employed at Harold's mother's restaurant, makes them reevaluate their friendship.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780606265850
Publisher:
Sanval, Inc.
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
60
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.90(h) x 1.50(d)

What People are saying about this

Frank Rich
"In 'Master Harold'... and the boys the author has journeyed so deep into the psychosis of racism that all national boundaries quickly fall away, that no one is left unimplicated by his vision... Mr. Fugard has forced us to face, point-blank, our capacity for hate... but we're also left with the exultant hope that we may yet practice compassion without stumbling... The choice, of course, is ours. Mr. Fugard's wrenching play, which insists that we make it, is beyond beauty."

Meet the Author

Athol Fugard was born in South Africa in 1932 and is an internationally acclaimed playwright. His best-known plays include Bloodknot (1961); Boesman and Lena (1969); Sizwe Bansi Is Dead (1972); The Island (1973), and My Children! My Africa! (1989).  

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Master Harold...and the Boys 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Master Harold takes intimate conflict to describe the larger conflict of racism. The characters of Sam and Willie follow and break conventions of ¿the black man¿. Conventionally they are poor and uneducated, but unlike the stereotype of simple-mindedness, they are 3-dimensional, introspective, dignified characters. Hally, as a white man, is educated and has decent money, but he is less dignified than Sam or Willie as his capacity for hate and bitterness is much stronger. Athol Fugard has taken the sterotypes and inverted them upon themselves, showing how shallow they can truly be.

When Hally inevitably degrades and slurs Sam and Willie, Fugard is quick to point out that it is not because of what they have done, or even Hally¿s dislike of them. He directs the reader to Hally¿s struggle with his dad¿s inability to be a role model which creates the bitterness inside of Hally which is then released upon the two easiest targets: Sam and Willie. He knows he can do this because at the time, racism was an acceptable policy in South Africa.

This is what I find most interesting about the book. Most other novels about racism take on the broad view of racism in society, but Fugard brings it down to a personal level, and that is where racism is. Racism is a personal hate against certain peoples excused by stereotypes to allow the racist to feel powerful and justified in their hate. Fugard shows how the problem is not with the races, but how people deal with their hate and how they take it out on other people. Because of this unique view, I recommend this book to anyone who has experienced racism.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book! There are a lot of very interesting symbolism and metaphors. Very thought-provoking on racism and how it has changed since the time the book was written. Very good book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a roller coaster of emotions that hits hard. Anyone who has ever experienced racism ought to read this, and anyone who thinks they've never encountered it--much less handed it out themselves, must read it!