Mastering the Instructional Design Process: A Systematic Approach / Edition 4

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Overview

Mastering the Instructional Design Process

Since is was first published in 1992, Mastering theInstructional Design Process has become a classic in the fieldproviding professionals, trainers, and students with a step-by-stepguide through all aspects of the instructional design process.

The fourth edition of Mastering the Instructional Design Processhas been completely revised and updated and is based on theinstructional design competencies of the International Board ofStandards of Performance and Instruction (IBSTPI). The bookidentifies the core competencies of instructional system design andpresents them in a way that helps to develop these competencies andapply them successfully in real-world settings. This comprehensiveresource covers the full range of topics for understanding andmastering the instructional design process including: detecting andsolving human performance problems; analyzing needs, learners, worksettings, and work; establishing performance objectives andperformance measurements; delivering the instruction effectively;and managing instructional design projects successfully.

The fourth edition reflects the most current information andchanges in the state-of-the-art of the instructional designprofession. Mastering the Instructional Design Process includes

  • Updated information on instructional alternatives
  • The most current information on instructional strategies andtechnology
  • Downloadable PowerPoint® lectures and slides for eachchapter
  • New chapters on the future of instructional design
  • A companion website offers helpful worksheets and activities

In addition, the book offers a self-assessment model for readersto measurement them-selves against research-based competencies ofeffective instructional designers.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

William J. Rothwell is professor of workplace learning andperformance on the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania StateUniversity. He is the author, coauthor, editor or coeditor of morethan 60 books in the learning and performance field, he is also aconsultant and president of his own consulting company, Rothwelland Associates, Inc.

H. C. Kazanas is professor emeritus of education in the Collegeof Education at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Hehas contributed several book chapters and monographs and hasauthored or coauthored eleven books relating to technical trainingin manufacturing and human resource development.

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Table of Contents

Tables, Figures, and Exhibits.

Preface to the Fourth Edition.

Acknowledgments.

About the International Board of Standards for Training,Performance, and Instruction.

About the Authors.

Pre-Test About Instructional Systems Design (ISD).

PART ONE: DETECTING AND SOLVING HUMAN PERFORMANCEPROBLEMS.

1. What Is Instructional Design?

2. Alternatives to Instructional Solutions: Five FrequentOptions.

3. Determining Projects Appropriate for Instructional DesignSolutions.

PART TWO: ANALYZING NEEDS, LEARNERS, WORK SETTINGS, ANDWORK.

4. Conducting a Needs Assessment.

5. Assessing Relevant Learner Characteristics.

6. Analyzing Relevant Work Setting Characteristics.

7. Performing Work Analysis.

PART THREE: ESTABLISHING PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES ANDPERFORMANCE MEASUREMENTS.

8. Writing Performance Objectives.

9. Developing Performance Measurements.

10. Sequencing Performance Objectives.

PART FOUR: DELIVERING THE INSTRUCTION EFFECTIVELY.

11. Specifying Instructional Strategies.

12. Selecting or Designing Instructional Materials.

13. Evaluating Instruction.

PART FIVE: MANAGING INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN PROJECTSSUCCESSFULLY.

14. Designing the Instructional Management System.

15. Planning and Monitoring Instructional Design Projects.

16. Communicating Effectively.

17. Interacting with Others.

18. Promoting the Use of Instructional Design.

19. Developing Yourself.

20. Being an Effective Instructional Designer: LessonsLearned.

Appendix I: Online Instructional Design Resources.

Appendix II: What Is Knowledge Management (KM), and How Does KMRelate to Instructional Design?.

Appendix III: Learning Theory and Instructional Design.

References.

Name Index.

Subject Index.

Contents of the Website.

Pfeiffer Publications Guide.

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