Mastering Unix Shell Scripting: BASH, KORN Shell, and KORN 93 Shell Scripting for Programmers, System Administrators and UNIX Gurus / Edition 2

Mastering Unix Shell Scripting: BASH, KORN Shell, and KORN 93 Shell Scripting for Programmers, System Administrators and UNIX Gurus / Edition 2

4.7 3
by Randal K. Michael
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0470183012

ISBN-13: 9780470183014

Pub. Date: 04/28/2008

Publisher: Wiley

UNIX expert Randal K. Michael guides you through every detail of writing shell scripts to automate specific tasks. Each chapter begins with a typical, everyday UNIX challenge, then shows you how to take basic syntax and turn it into a shell scripting solution. Covering Bash, Bourne, and Korn shell scripting, this updated edition provides complete shell scripts plus

Overview

UNIX expert Randal K. Michael guides you through every detail of writing shell scripts to automate specific tasks. Each chapter begins with a typical, everyday UNIX challenge, then shows you how to take basic syntax and turn it into a shell scripting solution. Covering Bash, Bourne, and Korn shell scripting, this updated edition provides complete shell scripts plus detailed descriptions of each part. UNIX programmers and system administrators can tailor these to build tools that monitor for specific system events and situations, building solid UNIX shell scripting skills to solve real-world system administration problems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470183014
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
04/28/2008
Pages:
1032
Sales rank:
1,175,741
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.20(h) x 2.50(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xxv

Introduction xxvii

Part One The Basics of Shell Scripting

Chapter 1 Scripting Quick Start and Review 3

Chapter 2 24 Ways to Process a File Line-by-Line 67

Chapter 3 Automated Event Notification 131

Chapter 4 Progress Indicators Using a Series of Dots, a Rotating Line, or Elapsed Time 143

Part Two Scripts for Programmers, Testers, and Analysts

Chapter 5 Working with Record Files 157

Chapter 6 Automated FTP Stuff 187

Chapter 7 Using rsync to Efficiently Replicate Data 219

Chapter 8 Automating Interactive Programs with Expect and Autoexpect 291

Chapter 9 Finding Large Files and Files of a Specific Type 325

Chapter 10 Process Monitoring and Enabling Pre-Processing, Startup, and Post-Processing Events 335

Chapter 11 Pseudo-Random Number and Data Generation 369

Chapter 12 Creating Pseudo-Random Passwords 401

Chapter 13 Floating-Point Math and the bc Utility 433

Chapter 14 Number Base Conversions 475

Chapter 15 hgrep: Highlighted grep Script 515

Chapter 16 Monitoring Processes and Applications 527

Part Three Scripts for Systems Administrators

Chapter 17 Filesystem Monitoring 553

Chapter 18 Monitoring Paging and Swap Space 603

Chapter 19 Monitoring System Load 641

Chapter 20 Monitoring for Stale Disk Partitions (AIX-Specific) 677

Chapter 21 Turning On/Off SSA Identification Lights 697

Chapter 22 Automated Hosts Pinging with Notification of Failure 723

Chapter 23 Creating a System-Configuration Snapshot 741

Chapter 24 Compiling, Installing, Configuring, and Using sudo 777

Chapter 25 Print-Queue Hell: Keeping the Printers Printing 809

Chapter 26 Those Pesky Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Audits 851

Chapter 27 Using Dirvish with rsync to Create Snapshot-Type Backups 867

Chapter 28 Monitoring and Auditing User Keystrokes 935

Appendix A What’s on the Web Site 955

Index 977

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Mastering Unix Shell Scripting: BASH, KORN Shell, and KORN 93 Shell Scripting for Programmers, System Administrators and UNIX Gurus 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
[A review of the 2ND EDITION, where the latter was published in June 2008.] Perhaps you are a programmer or sysadmin of a heterogeneous network of unix and linux machines. Where the unixes hail from different vendors. Think Solaris, HP-UX, AIX and the Macintosh. (Yes, the Mac runs a descendent of Mach, which is a dialect of unix.) And maybe the linux boxes have different distros. This book spans the gamut of most unixes (I include linux in this). Helping you easily write shell scripts, without taking sides over which unix or linux version is better. The second ecumenical aspect is that it also avoids favouring any of the 3 major unix shells - Borne, Korn and bash. In some newsgroups, there has been a tedious and interminable debate about the relative virtues of these shells. While one shell might indeed be better than others for a given task, in general they have equivalent functionality. The book's evenhanded approach is one worth emulating. Thoughtfully, the book suggests topics that might be typically useful to sysadmins, and others more suited to programmers. It is not a strict divide. But for sysadmins, you can see discussions about how to monitor disk partitions, or system load and swap space usage. These are often issues germane to your duties. The bulk of the book is more on programmer-related topics. Much. Note that the book is largely random access, unlike a science textbook for example, which is serial access from the front. In other words, with just a minimal acquaintance with basic scripting, you can dive straight into any chapter, without reading its predecessor.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would suggest this book for any System Administrators with desire to learn shell scripting. If you would like to learn more shell scripting this is the perfect book!!!!