Masters of British Literature, Volumes A & B package / Edition 1

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More About This Textbook

Overview

Written by an editorial team whose members are all actively engaged in teaching and in current scholarship, Masters of British Literature is a concise, but comprehensive survey of the key writers whose classic works have shaped British literature. Featuring major works by the most influential authors in the British literary tradition–from Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Swift to Wollstonecraft, Keats, Joyce, and Rushdie–the two compact anthologies in this package offer comprehensive coverage of the enduring works of the British literary tradition from the Middle Ages through the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, then from the Romantics through the twentieth century. Core texts are complemented by contextual materials that help students understand the literary, historical, and cultural environments out which these texts arose, and within which they find their richest meaning.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205559725
  • Publisher: Longman
  • Publication date: 3/21/2007
  • Series: Damrosch Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 2
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.60 (d)

Table of Contents

THE MIDDLE AGES

BEFORE THE NORMAN CONQUEST

BEOWULF

Response

John Gardner, from Grendel

EARLY ENGLISH NARRATIVE

The Labour Pains of the Ulaid

The Birth of Cú Chulainn

The Naming of Cú Chulainn

EARLY ENGLISH VERSE

To Crinog

Pangur the Cat

Writing in the Wood

The Viking Terror

The Old Woman of Beare

Findabair Remembers Fróech

A Grave Marked with Ogam

from The Voyage of Máel Dúin

THE DREAM OF THE ROOD

THE WANDERER

WULF AND EADWACER and WIFE'S LAMENT

RIDDLES

Three Anglo-Latin Riddles by Aldhelm

Five Old English Riddles

Arthurian Romance

MARIE DE FRANCE

from Lais

Prologue

Lanval

Chevrefoil (The Honeysuckle)

SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT

(Translated by J.R.R. Tolkien)

SIR THOMAS MALORY

Morte Darthur

from Caxton’s Prologue

The Miracle of Galahad

GEOFFREY CHAUCER

The Canterbury Tales

The General Prologue (Middle English and modern translation)

The Miller’s Tale

The Introduction

The Tale

The Wife of Bath’s Prologue

The Wife of Bath’s Tale

The Nun’s Priest’s Tale

The Parson’s Tale

The Introduction

[The Remedy for the Sin of Lechery]

Chaucer’s Retraction

To His Scribe Adam

Complaint to His Purse

WILLIAM LANGLAND

Piers Plowman

Prologue

Passus 2

from Passus 6

Passus 8

“PIERS PLOWMAN” AND ITS TIME

The Rising of 1381

Three Poems on the Rising of 1381: John Ball’s First Letter•John Ball’s Second Letter• The Course of Revolt•John Gower:from The Voice of One Crying

Medieval Biblical Drama

THE SECOND PLAY OF THE SHEPHERDS

VERNACULAR RELIGION

The Wycliffite Bible

John 10.11—18

from A Wycliffite Sermon on John 10.11—18

MARGERY KEMPE

The Book of Margery Kempe

The Preface

[Meeting with Bishop of Lincoln and Archbishop of Canterbury]

[Visit with Julian of Norwich]

MIDDLE ENGLISH LYRICS

The Cuckoo Song (“Sumer is icumen in”)

Alisoun (“Bitwene Mersh and Averil”)

I Have a Noble Cock

Abuse of Women (“In every place ye may well see”)

Adam Lay Ibounden

I Sing of a Maiden

In Praise of Mary (“Edi be thu, Hevene Quene”)

Mary Is with Child (“Under a tree”)

Jesus, My Sweet Lover (“Jesu Christ, my lemmon swete”)

Contempt of the World (“Where beth they biforen us weren?”)

WILLIAM DUNBAR

Lament for the Makars

Done Is a Battell

In Secreit Place This Hyndir Nycht

CHRISTINE DE PIZAN

from Book of the City of Ladies

(trans. by Earl Jeffrey Richards)

THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD

JOHN SKELTON

Womanhod, Wanton

Lullay

Knolege, Aquayntance

Manerly Margery Mylk and Ale

Garland of Laurel

To Maystres Jane Blennerhasset

To Maystres Isabell Pennell

To Maystres Margaret Hussey

SIR THOMAS WYATT

The Long Love, That in My Thought Doth Harbor

Companion Reading

Petrarch: Sonnet 140

Whoso List to Hunt

Companion Reading

Petrarch: Sonnet 190

My Galley

They Flee from Me

Some Time I Fled the Fire

My Lute, Awake!

Tagus, Farewell

Forget Not Yet

Blame Not My Lute

Lucks, My Fair Falcon, and Your Fellows All

Stand Whoso List

Mine Own John Poyns

HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF SURREY

Love That Doth Reign and Live within My Thought

Th’Assyrians’ King, in Peace with Foul Desire

Set Me Whereas the Sun Doth Parch the Green

The Soote Season

Alas, So All Things Now Do Hold Their Peace

Companion Reading

Petrarch: Sonnet 164

So Cruel Prison

London, Hast Thou Accused Me

Wyatt Resteth Here

My Radcliffe, When Thy Reckless Youth Offends

EDMUND SPENSER

The Faerie Queene

A Letter of the Authors

The First Booke of the Faerie Queene

Amoretti

1 (“Happy ye leaves when as those lilly hands”)

4 (“New yeare forth looking out of Janus gate”)

13 (“In that proud port, which her so goodly graceth”)

22 (“This holy season fit to fast and pray”)

62 (“The weary yeare his race now having run”)

65 (“The doubt which ye misdeeme, fayre love, is vaine”)

66 (“To all those happy blessings which ye have”)

68 (“Most glorious Lord of lyfe that on this day”)

75 (“One day I wrote her name upon the strand”)

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY

The Apology for Poetry

Astrophil and Stella

1 (“Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show”)

3 (“Let dainty wits cry on the sisters nine”)

7 (“When Nature made her chief work, Stella’s eyes”)

24 (“Rich fool there be whose base and filthy heart”)

31 (“With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb’st the skies”)

45 (“Stella oft sees the very face of woe”)

52 (“A strife is grown between Virtue and Love”)

60 (“When my good Angel guides me to the place”)

63 (“O grammar-rules, O now your virtues show”)

68 (“Stella, the only planet of my light”)

71 (“Who will in fairest book of Nature know”)

Second song (“Have I caught my heavenly jewel”)

74 (“I never drank of Aganippe well”)

89 (“Now that, of absence, the most irksome night”)

90 (“Stella, think not that I by verse seek fame”)

104 (“Envious wits, what hath been mine offense”)

106 (“O absent presence, Stella is not here”)

107 (“Stella, since thou so right a princess art”)

108 (“When sorrow (using mine own fire’s might)”)

ISABELLA WHITNEY

The Admonition by the Author

A Careful Complaint by the Unfortunate Author

MARY HERBERT, COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE

Even Now That Care

To Thee Pure Sprite

Psalm 71: In Te Domini Speravi (“On thee my trust is grounded”)

Companion Reading

Miles Coverdale: Psalm 71

Psalm 121: Levavi Oculos (“Unto the hills, I now will bend”)

The Doleful Lay of Clorinda

ELIZABETH I

Written with a Diamond on Her Window at Woodstock

Written on a Wall at Woodstock

The Doubt of Future Foes

On Monsieur’s Departure

Speeches

On Marriage

On Mary, Queen of Scots

On Mary’s Execution

To the English Troops at Tilbury, Facing the Spanish Armada

The Golden Speech

AEMILIA LANYER

The Description of Cookham

Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum

To the Doubtful Reader

To the Virtuous Reader

[Invocation]

[Against Beauty Without Virtue]

[Pilate's Wife Apologizes for Eve]

CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

Response

Sir Walter Raleigh: The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd

The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus

SIR WALTER RALEIGH

Nature That Washed Her Hands in Milk

To the Queen

On the Life of Man

The Author’s Epitaph, Made by Himself

As You Came from the Holy Land

The Discovery of the Large, Rich and Beautiful Empire of Guiana

from Epistle Dedicatory

To the Reader

[The Amazons]

[The Orinoco]

[The King of Aromaia]

[The New World of Guiana]

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Sonnets

1 (“From fairest creatures we desire increase”)

18 (“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day”)

20 (“A woman’s face with Nature’s own hand painted”)

29 (“When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes”)

30 (“When to the sessions of sweet silent thought”)

33 (“Full many a glorious morning have I seen”)

55 (“Not marble nor the gilded monuments”)

60 (“Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore”)

71 (“No longer mourn for me when I am dead”)

73 (“That time of year thou mayst in me behold”)

87 (“Farewell! Thou art too dear for my possessing”)

94 (“They that have pow’r to hurt, and will do none”)

104 (“To me, fair friend, you never can be old”)

116 (“Let me not to the marriage of true minds”)

126 (“O thou, my lovely boy, who in thy power”)

129 (“The expense of spirit in a waste of shame”)

130 (“My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun”)

138 (“When my love swears that she is made of truth”)

144 (“Two loves I have, of comfort and despair”)

152 (“In loving thee thou know’st I am forsworn”)

The Tempest

Response

Aime Cesaire: from A Tempest

PERSPECTIVES

Tracts on Women and Gender

Desiderius Erasmus

from In Laude and Praise of Matrimony

Barnabe Riche

from My Lady’s Looking Glass

Margaret Tyler

from Preface to The First Part of the Mirror of Princely Deeds

Joseph Swetnam

from The Arraignment of Lewd, Idle, Froward, and Unconstant Women

Rachel Speght

from A Muzzle for Melastomus

Ester Sowernam

from Ester Hath Hanged Haman

Hic Mulier and Haec-Vir

from Hic Mulier; or, The Man-Woman

from Haec-Vir; or, The Womanish-Man

THOMAS CAMPION

My sweetest Lesbia, let us live and love

There is a garden in her face

Rose-cheeked Laura, come

When thou must home to shades of underground

Never weather-beaten sail more willing bent to shore

BEN JONSON

On Something, That Walks Somewhere

On My First Daughter

To John Donne

On My First Son

Inviting a Friend to Supper

To Penshurst

Song to Celia

Queen and Huntress

To the Memory of My Beloved, the Author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and What He Hath Left Us

JOHN DONNE

The Good Morrow

Song (“Go, and catch a falling star”)

The Sun Rising

The Canonization

A Valediction: of Weeping

Love’s Alchemy

The Flea

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

The Ecstasy

The Funeral

The Relic

Elegy 19: To His Mistress Going to Bed

Holy Sonnets

1 (“As due by many titles I resign”)

2 (“Oh my black soul! Now thou art summoned”)

3 (“This is my play’s last scene, here heavens appoint”)

4 (“At the round earth’s imagined corners, blow”)

5 (“If poisonous minerals, and if that tree”)

6 (“Death be not proud, though some have called thee”)

10 (“Batter my heart, three-personed God; for, you”)

Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions

[“For whom the bell tolls”]

LADY MARY WORTH

Pamphilia to Amphilanthus

1 (“When night’s black mantle could most darkness prove”)

5 (“Can pleasing sight misfortune ever bring?”)

16 (“Am I thus conquered? Have I lost the powers”)

55 (“How like a fire does love increase in me”)

68 (“My pain, still smothered in my grièved breast”)

from The Countess of Montgomery’s Urania

ROBERT HERRICK

Hesperides

The Argument of His Book

To His Book

Corinna’s Going A-Maying

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

His Prayer to Ben Jonson

Upon Julia’s Clothes

The Christian Militant

To His Tomb-Maker

Upon Himself Being Buried

His Last Request to Julia

GEORGE HERBERT

The Altar

Redemption

Easter

Easter Wings

Man

Jordan (2)

Time

The Collar

The Pulley

The Forerunners

Love (3)

ANDREW MARVELL

The Coronet

Bermudas

To His Coy Mistress

The Definition of Love

An Horatian Ode Upon Cromwell’s Return from Ireland

KATHERINE PHILIPS

Friendship in Emblem, or the Seal

Upon the Double Murder of King Charles

On the Third of September, 1651

To the Truly Noble, and Obliging Mrs. Anne Owen

To Mrs. Mary Awbrey at Parting

To My Excellent Lucasia, on Our Friendship

JOHN MILTON

Lycidas

How Soon Hath Time

On the New Forcers of Conscience Under the Long Parliament

To the Lord General Cromwell

On the Late Massacre in Piedmont

When I Consider How My Light Is Spent

Methought I Saw My Late Espoused Saint

Paradise Lost

Book 1

Book 2

Book 9

Book 12

THE RESTORATION and the EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

SAMUEL PEPYS

from The Diary

[First Entries]

[The Coronation of Charles II]

[The Fire of London]

MARGARET CAVENDISH, DUCHESS OF NEWCASTLE

POEMS AND FANCIES

The Poetress’s Hasty Resolution

The Poetress’s Petition

An Apology for Writing So Much upon This Book

from The Description of a New Blazing World

from To the Reader

[Creating Worlds]

[Empress, Duchess, Duke]

Epilogue

JOHN DRYDEN

Mac Flecknoe

To the Memory of Mr. Oldham

Alexander’s Feast

APHRA BEHN

The Disappointment

To Lysander, on Some Verses He Writ

To Lysander at the Music-Meeting

A Letter to Mr. Creech at Oxford

To the Fair Clarinda, Who Made Love to Me, Imagined More than
Woman

JOHN WILMOT, EARL OF ROCHESTER

Against Constancy

The Disabled Debauchee

Song (“Love a woman? You’re an ass!”)

The Imperfect Enjoyment

Upon Nothing

A Satyr Against Reason and Mankind

WILLIAM WYCHERLEY

The Country Wife

DANIEL DEFOE

A Journal of the Plague Year

[At the Burial Pit]

[Encounter with a Waterman]

Perspectives

Reading Papers

News and Comment

from Mercurius Publicus [Anniversary of the Regicide]

from The London Gazette [The Fire of London]

from The Daily Courant No. 1 [Editorial Policy]

Daniel Defoe: from A Review of the State of the British
Nation, Vol. 4, No. 21 [The New Union]

from The Craftsman No. 307 [Vampires in Britain]

Periodical Personae

Richard Steele: from Tatler No. 1 [Introducing Mr. Bickerstaff]

Joseph Addison: from Spectator No. 1 [Introducing Mr. Spectator]

from Female Spectator, Vol. 1, No. 1 [The Author’s Intent]

Richard Steele: from Tatler No. 18 [The News Writers in Danger]

Joseph Addison: from Tatler No. 155 [The Political Upholsterer]

Joseph Addison: from Spectator No. 10 [The Spectator and Its Readers]

Getting, Spending, Speculating

Joseph Addison: Spectator No. 69 [Royal Exchange]

Richard Steele: Spectator No. 11 [Inkle and Yarico]

Daniel Defoe: from A Review of the State of the British Nation, Vol. 1, No. 43 [Weak Foundations]

Advertisements from the Spectator

Women and Men, Manners and Marriage

Richard Steele: from Tatler No. 25 [Duellists]

Daniel Defoe: from A Review of the State of the British Nation, Vol. 9, No. 34 [A Duellist’s Conscience]

from The Athenian Mercury

Richard Steele: from Tatler No. 104 [Jenny Distaff Newly Married]

Joseph Addison: Spectator No. 128 [Variety of Temper]

Eliza Haywood: from The Female Spectator, Vol. 1, No. 1 [Seomanthe’s Elopement]

Eliza Haywood: from The Female Spectator, Vol. 2, No. 10 [Women’s Education]

JONATHAN SWIFT

A Description of the Morning

A Description of a City Shower

Stella’s Birthday, 1719

Stella’s Birthday, 1727

The Lady’s Dressing Room

Response

Lady Mary Wortley Montagu: The Reasons that induced Dr. S. to write a Poem called The Lady’s Dressing Room

Gulliver’s Travels

from Part 3. A Voyage to Laputa

Part 4. A Voyage to the Country of the Houyhnhnms

A Modest Proposal

“A Modest Proposal” and Its Time

William Pettyfrom Political Arithmetic

ALEXANDER POPE

An Essay on Criticism

The Rape of the Lock

The Iliad

from Preface [On Translation]

from Book 12 [Sarpedon’s Speech]

from An Essay on Man

Epistle 1

To the Reader

The Design

Argument

from The Dunciad

from Book the Fourth

[The Goddess Coming in Her Majesty]

[The Geniuses of the Schools]

[Young Gentlemen Returned from Travel]

LADY MARY WORTLEY MONTAGU

from The Turkish Embassy Letters

To Lady—[On the Turkish Baths]

To Lady Mar [On Turkish Dress]

Letter to Lady Bute [On Her Granddaughter]

Epistle from Mrs. Yonge to Her Husband

The Lover: A Ballad

JOHN GAY

The Beggar’s Opera

JAMES THOMSON

from The Seasons

from Autumn

Rule, Britannia

THOMAS GRAY

Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard

SAMUEL JOHNSON

The Vanity of Human Wishes

THE RAMBLER

No. 4 [On Fiction]

No. 5 [On Spring]

THE IDLER

No. 31 [On Idleness]

No. 84 [On Autobiography]

JAMES BOSWELL

from London Journal

[A Scot in London]

[First Meeting with Johnson]

from The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

[Introduction; Boswell’s Method]

[Dinner with Wilkes]

OLIVER GOLDSMITH

The Deserted Village

ELIZA HAYWOOD

Fantomina: Or, Love in a Maze

Credits

Index

THE ROMANTICS and THEIR CONTEMPORARIES

ANNA LETITIA BARBAULD

The Mouse’s Petition to Dr. Priestley

On a Lady’s Writing

Inscription for an Ice-House

To a Little Invisible Being Who Is Expected Soon to Become Visible

Eighteen Hundred and Eleven

CHARLOTTE SMITH

FROM ELEGIAC SONNETS AND OTHER POEMS

To the Moon

“Sighing I see yon little troop at play”

To melancholy. Written on the banks of the Arun October, 1785

The sea view

The Dead Beggar

from Beachy Head

WILLIAM BLAKE

All Religions Are One

SONGS OF INNOCENCE AND OF EXPERIENCE

from Songs of Innocence

Introduction

The Shepherd

The Ecchoing Green

The Lamb

The Little Black Boy

The Blossom

The Chimney Sweeper

The Little Boy lost

The Little Boy found

The Divine Image

HOLY THURSDAY

Nurses Song

Infant Joy

A Dream

On Anothers Sorrow

from Songs of Experience

Introduction

EARTH’S Answer

The CLOD & the PEBBLE

HOLY THURSDAY

The Little Girl Lost

The Little Girl Found

The Chimney Sweeper

NURSES Song

The SICK ROSE

The FLY

The Angel

The Tyger

My Pretty ROSE TREE

AH! SUN-FLOWER

THE GARDEN of LOVE

LONDON

The Human Abstract

INFANT SORROW

The Little BOY Lost

The Little GIRL Lost

The School-Boy

A Divine Image

PERSPECTIVES

The Abolition of Slavery and the Slave Trade

Olaudah Equiano

from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano

Mary Prince

from The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave

Thomas Bellamy

The Benevolent Planters

John Newton

Amazing Grace!

Ann Cromartie Yearsley

from A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade

William Cowper

Sweet Meat Has Sour Sauce

The Negro’s Complaint

Hannah More and Eaglesfield Smith

The Sorrows of Yamba

Robert Southey

from Poems Concerning the Slave-Trade

Dorothy Wordsworth

from The Grasmere Journals

Thomas Clarkson

from The History of the Rise, Progress, & Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade by the British Parliament

William Wordsworth

To Toussaint L’Ouverture

To Thomas Clarkson

from The Prelude

from Humanity

Letter to Mary Ann Rawson (May 1833)

The Edinburgh Review

from Abstract of the Information laid on the Table of the House of Commons, on the Subject of the Slave Trade

George Gordon, Lord Byron

from Detached Thoughts

MARY ROBINSON

Ode to Beauty

January, 1795

from Sappho and Phaon, in a Series of Legitimate Sonnets

III. The Bower of Pleasure

IV. Sappho discovers her Passion

VII. Invokes Reason

XI. Rejects the Influence of Reason

XII. Previous to her Interview with Phaon

XVIII. To Phaon

XXX. Bids farewell to Lesbos

XXXVII. Foresees her Death

The Old Beggar

MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

from To M.Talleyrand-Périgord, Late Bishop of Autun

Introduction

from Chapter 1. The Rights and Involved Duties of Mankind Considered

from Chapter 2. The Prevailing Opinion of a Sexual Character Discussed

JOANNA BAILLIE

London

A Mother to Her Waking Infant

A Child to His Sick Grandfather

Thunder

Song: Woo’d and Married and A’

Literary Ballads

RELIQUES OF ANCIENT ENGLISH POETRY

Sir Patrick Spence

ROBERT BURNS

To a Mouse

To a Louse

Flow gently, sweet Afton

Ae fond kiss

Comin’ Thro’ the Rye (1)

Comin’ Thro’ the Rye (2)

A Red, Red Rose

Auld Lang Syne

The Fornicator. A New Song

SIR WALTER SCOTT

Lord Randal

THOMAS MOORE

The harp that once through Tara’s halls

Believe me, if all those endearing young charms

The time I’ve lost in wooing

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

LYRICAL BALLARDS

Simon Lee

Anecdote for Fathers

We are seven

Expostulation and Reply

Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey

LYRICAL BALLARDS (1800, 1802)

from Preface

[The Principal Object of the Poems. Humble and Rustic Life]

[“The Spontaneous Overflow of Powerful Feelings”]

[The Language of Poetry]

[What is a Poet?]

[“Emotion Recollected in Tranquillity”]

“Strange fits of passion have I known”

Song (“She dwelt among th’ untrodden ways”)

“A slumber did my spirit seal”

Lucy Gray

Poor Susan

Nutting

Michael

RESPONSES

Francis Jeffrey: [“the new poetry”]

Charles Lamb: from a letter to William Wordsworth

Charles Lamb: from a letter to Thomas Manning

SONNETS, 1802–1807

Prefatory Sonnet (“Nuns fret not at their Convent’s narrow room”)

Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3, 1802

“The world is too much with us”

“It is a beauteous Evening”

London, 1802

from THE PRELUDE, OR GROWTH OF A POET'S MIND

Book First. Introduction, Childhood, and School time

from Book Second. School time continued

[Two Consciousnesses]

[Blessed Infant Babe]

from Book Sixth. Cambridge, and the Alps

[Arrival in France]

[Travelling in the Alps. Simplon Pass]

from Book Ninth. Residence in France

[Revolution, Royalists, and Patriots]

from Book Tenth. Residence in France and French Revolution

[The Reign of Terror. Confusion. Return to England]

from Book Eleventh. Imagination, How Impaired and Restored

[Imagination Restored by Nature]

[“Spots of Time.” Two Memories from Childhood and Later Reflections]

“I travell’d among unknown Men”

Resolution and Independence

“I wandered lonely as a cloud”

“My heart leaps up”

Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood

Surprized by joy

Scorn not the Sonnet

DOROTHY WORDSWORTH

Grasmere—A Fragment

Thoughts on My Sick-bed

When Shall I Tread Your Garden Path?

Lines Written (Rather Say Begun) on the Morning of Sunday April 6th

from The Grasmere Journals

[Home Alone]

[A Leech Gatherer]

[A Woman Beggar]

[An Old Soldier]

[The Grasmere Mailman]

[A Vision of the Moon]

[A Field of Daffodils]

[A Beggar Woman from Cockermouth]

[The Circumstances of “Composed upon Westminster Bridge”]

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

Sonnet to the River Otter

The Eolian Harp

This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison

Frost at Midnight

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1817)

Christabel

Kubla Khan

The Pains of Sleep

Dejection: An Ode

Biographia Literaria

Chapter 4

[Wordsworth’s Earlier Poetry]

Chapter 11

[The Profession of Literature]

Chapter 13

[Imagination and Fancy]

Chapter 14

[Occasion of the Lyrical Ballads—Preface to the Second Edition—The Ensuing Controversy]

[Philosophic Definitions of a Poem and Poetry]

from Lectures on Shakespeare

[Mechanic vs. Organic Form]

GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON

She walks in beauty

So, we’ll go no more a-roving

Manfred

" MANFRED' AND ITS TIME

THE BYRONIC HERO

Byron’s Earlier HeroesfromThe Giaour• fromThe Corsair fromLara • Prometheus• from Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Canto the Third[Napoleon Buonaparte]

Samuel Taylor ColeridgefromThe Statesman’s Manual [“Satanic Pride and Rebellious Self-Idolatry”]

Caroline LambfromGlenarvon

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelleyfrom Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus

Felicia HemansfromThe Widow of Crescentius

Percy Bysshe Shelleyfrom Preface to Prometheus Unbound • from Prometheus Unbound, Act 1

Robert Southeyfrom Preface to A Vision of Judgement

George Gordon, Lord Byronfrom The Vision of Judgement

CHILD HAROLD'S PILGRIMAGE

from Canto the Third

[Thunderstorm in the Alps]

[Byron’s Strained Idealism. Apostrophe to His Daughter]

from Canto the Fourth

[Rome. Political Hopes]

[Apostrophe to the Ocean. Conclusion]

DON JUAN

Dedication

Canto 1

from Canto 7 [Critique of Military “Glory”]

from Canto 11 [Juan in England]

Stanzas (“When a man hath no freedom to fight for at home”)

On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

To Wordsworth

Mont Blanc

Hymn to Intellectual Beauty

Ozymandias

Sonnet: Lift not the painted veil

Sonnet: England in 1819

Ode to the West Wind

To a Sky-Lark

To—(“Music, when soft voices die”)

Adonais

The Cloud

from Hellas

Chorus (“Worlds on worlds are rolling ever”)

Chorus (“The world’s great age begins anew”)

from A Defence of Poetry

FELICIA HEMANS

from TALES, AND HISTORIC SCENES, IN VERSE

Evening Prayer, at a Girls’ School

Casabianca

from RECORDS OF WOMAN

Indian Woman’s Death-Song

Joan of Arc, in Rheims

The Homes of England

The Graves of a Household

Corinne at the Capitol

Woman and Fame

JOHN CLARE

Written in November (manuscript)

Written in November

Songs Eternity

[The Mouse’s Nest]

JOHN KEATS

ON FIRST LOOKING INTO CHAPMAN'S HOMER

Young Poets

On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer.

“To one who has been long in city pent”

On Seeing the Elgin Marbles

On sitting down to read King Lear once again

Sonnet: When I have fears

The Eve of St. Agnes

La Belle Dame sans Mercy

THE ODES OF 1819

Ode to Psyche

Ode to a Nightingale

Ode on a Grecian Urn

Ode on Indolence

Ode on Melancholy

To Autumn

This living hand

Bright Star

LETTERS

To George and Thomas Keats [“Intensity” and “Negative Capability”]

To Richard Woodhouse [The “Camelion Poet” vs. The “Egotistical Sublime”]

To Charles Brown [Keats’s Last Letter]

THE VICTORIAN AGE

THOMAS CARLYLE

from Gospel of Mammonism [The Irish Widow]

from Labour [Know Thy Work]

from Democracy [Liberty to Die by Starvation]

Captains of Industry

JOHN STUART MILL

On Liberty

from Chapter 2. Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion

from Chapter 3. Of Individuality, as One of the Elements of Well-Being

ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

To George Sand: A Desire

To George Sand: A Recognition

A Year’s Spinning

Sonnets from the Portuguese

1 (“I thought once how Theocritus had sung”)

13 (“And wilt thou have me fashion into speech”)

14 (“If thou must love me, let it be for nought”)

21 (“Say over again, and yet once over again”)

22 (“When our two souls stand up erect and strong”)

43 (“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways”)

Aurora Leigh

Book 1

[Self-Portrait]

[Her Mother’s Portrait]

[Aurora’s Education]

[Discovery of Poetry]

Book 2

[Woman and Artist]

[No Female Christ]

Book 5

[Epic Art and Modern Life]

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON

The Kraken

Mariana

The Lady of Shalott

The Lotos-Eaters

Ulysses

Tithonus

Break, Break, Break

The Epic [Morte d’Arthur]

THE PRINCESS

Sweet and Low

Come Down, O Maid

[The Woman’s Cause Is Man’s]

from In Memoriam A. H. H.

The Charge of the Light Brigade

Idylls of the King

The Coming of Arthur

The Higher Pantheism

Flower in the Crannied Wall

Crossing the Bar

CHARLES DARWIN

On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection

fromChapter 3. Struggle for Existence

PERSPECTIVES

Religion and Science

Thomas Babington Macaulay

from Lord Bacon

Charles Dickens

from Sunday Under Three Heads

David Friedrich Strauss

from The Life of Jesus Critically Examined

Charlotte Brontë

from Jane Eyre

Arthur Hugh Clough

Epi-strauss-ium

The Latest Decalogue

from Dipsychus

John William Colenso

from The Pentateuch and Book of Joshua Critically Examined

John Henry Cardinal Newman

from Apologia Pro Vita Sua

Thomas Henry Huxley

from Evolution and Ethics

Sir Edmund Gosse

from Father and Son

ROBERT BROWNING

Porphyria’s Lover

Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

My Last Duchess

The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed’s Church

Meeting at Night

Parting at Morning

A Toccata of Galuppi’s

Memorabilia

Love Among the Ruins

“Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came”

Fra Lippo Lippi

The Last Ride Together

Andrea del Sarto

CHARLES DICKENS

A Christmas Carol

SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

A Scandal in Bohemia

JOHN RUSKIN

Modern Painters

from Definition of Greatness in Art

from Of Water, As Painted by Turner

The Storm-Cloud of the Nineteenth Century

MATTHEW ARNOLD

Isolation. To Marguerite

To Marguerite—Continued

Dover Beach

RESPONSE

Anthony Hecht: The Dover Bitch

Lines Written in Kensington Gardens

The Buried Life

The Scholar-Gipsy

Culture and Anarchy

from Sweetness and Light

from Doing as One Likes

from Hebraism and Hellenism

from Conclusion

DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI

The Blessed Damozel

The Woodspurge

The House of Life

The Sonnet

4. Lovesight

6. The Kiss

Nuptial Sleep

CHRISTINA ROSSETTI

Song (“She sat and sang alway”)

Song (“When I am dead, my dearest”)

Remember

After Death

A Pause

Echo

Dead Before Death

An Apple-Gathering

Up-Hill

Goblin Market

Promises Like Pie-Crust

ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE

The Triumph of Time

I Will Go Back to the Great Sweet Mother

Hymn to Proserpine

A Forsaken Garden

WALTER PATER

from The Renaissance

Preface

from Leonardo da Vinci

Conclusion

GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS

God’s Grandeur

The Windhover

Pied Beauty

Binsey Poplars

Felix Randal

As Kingfishers Catch Fire

[Carrion Comfort]

No Worst, There Is None

I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day

That Nature Is a Heraclitean Fire and of the Comfort of the Resurrection

Thou Art Indeed Just, Lord

RUDYARD KIPLING

Without Benefit of Clergy

from JUST SO STORIES

How the Leopard Got His Spots

Gunga Din

The Widow at Windsor

Recessional

If—

OSCAR WILDE

Impression du Matin

RESPONSE

Lord Alfred Douglas: Impression de Nuit

The Harlot’s House

Symphony in Yellow

Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Importance of Being Earnest

Aphorisms

from De Profundis

COMPANION READING

H. Montgomery Hyde: from The Trials of Oscar Wilde

THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

JOSEPH CONRAD

Preface to The Nigger of the “Narcissus”

Heart of Darkness

“Heart of Darkness” and Its Time

Joseph Conrad: from Congo Diary

Sir Henry Morton Stanley: from Address to the Manchester Chamber of Commerce

RESPONSES

Chinua Achebe: An Image of Africa

Gang of Four: We Live As We Dream, Alone

THOMAS HARDY

Hap

Neutral Tones

Wessex Heights

The Darkling Thrush

On the Departure Platform

The Convergence of the Twain

Channel Firing

In Time of “The Breaking of Nations”

I Looked Up from My Writing

“And There Was a Great Calm”

Epitaph

PERSPECTIVES

The Great War: Confronting the Modern

Blast

Vorticist Manifesto

Rebecca West

Indissoluble Matrimony

Rupert Brooke

The Great Lover

The Soldier

Siegfried Sassoon

Glory of Women

“They”

The Rear-Guard

Everyone Sang

Wilfred Owen

Anthem for Doomed Youth

Strange Meeting

Disabled

Dulce Et Decorum Est

Isaac Rosenberg

Break of Day in the Trenches

Dead Man’s Dump

The Women Poets of World War I

Cicely Hamilton

Non-Combatant

May Wedderburn Cannan

Lamplight

Rouen

Pauline Barrington

“Education”

Helen Dircks

After Bourlon Wood

Alys Fane Trotter

The Hospital Visitor

Teresa Hooley

A War Film

WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

The Lake Isle of Innisfree

Who Goes with Fergus?

No Second Troy

The Fascination of What’s Difficult

September 1913

The Wild Swans at Coole

An Irish Airman Foresees His Death

Easter 1916

The Second Coming

A Prayer for My Daughter

Sailing to Byzantium

Leda and the Swan

Among School Children

Byzantium

Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop

Lapis Lazuli

The Circus Animals’ Desertion

Under Ben Bulben

JAMES JOYCE

Dubliners

Araby

Eveline

Clay

The Dead

T. S. ELIOT

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

Gerontion

The Waste Land

RESPONSES

Fadwa Tuqan: In the Aging City

Martin Rowson: from The Waste Land

Journey of the Magi

Four Quartets

Burnt Norton

Tradition and the Individual Talent

VIRGINIA WOOLF

The Lady in the Looking-Glass: A Reflection

from A Room of One’s Own

KATHERINE MANSFIELD

The Daughters of the Late Colonel

D. H. LAWRENCE

Piano

Song of a Man Who Has Come Through

Tortoise Shout

Snake

Bavarian Gentians

Cypresses

Odour of Chrysanthemums

DYLAN THOMAS

The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower

Fern Hill

Poem in October

Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night

SAMUEL BECKETT

Endgame

Postwar Poets: English Voices

W. H. AUDEN

Musée des Beaux Arts

In Memory of W. B. Yeats

Spain 1937

Lullaby

September 1, 1939

In Praise of Limestone

PHILIP LARKIN

Church Going

High Windows

Talking in Bed

MCMXIV

TED HUGHES

Wind

Relic

Theology

Dust As We Are

Leaf Mould

Telegraph Wires

SALMAN RUSHDIE

The Courter

PERSPECTIVES

Whose Language?

LOUISE BENNETT

Back to Africa

Colonization in Reverse

Independance

from NG~uG~I WA THIONG’O

Decolonizing the Mind

Native African Languages

NADINE GORDIMER

What Were You Dreaming?

DEREK WALCOTT

A Far Cry from Africa

Wales

The Fortunate Traveller

SEAMUS HEANEY

Punishment

The Skunk

The Toome Road

The Singer’s House

In Memoriam Francis Ledwidge

Postscript

A Call

The Errand

JAMES KELMAN

Home for a Couple of Days

EAVAN BOLAND

Anorexic

Mise Eire

The Pomegranate

A Woman Painted on a Leaf

LORNA GOODISON

The Mulatta as Penelope

On Becoming a Mermaid

Annie Pengelly

AGHA SHAHID ALI

Beyond English

In Arabic

Tonight

PAUL MULDOON

Cuba

Aisling

Meeting the British

Sleeve Notes

NUALA NÍ DHOMhNAILL

Feeding a Child

Parthenogenesis

Labasheedy (The Silken Bed)

As for the Quince

Why I Choose to Write in Irish, The Corpse That Sits Up and Talks Back

GWYNETH LEWIS

Therapy

Mother Tongue

ROBERT CRAWFORD

The Saltcoats Structuralists

Alba Einstein

W. N. HERBERT

Cabaret McGonagall

Smirr

Credits

Index

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