Masters of War: Latin America and U.S. Agression From the Cuban Revolution Through the Clinton Years

Masters of War: Latin America and U.S. Agression From the Cuban Revolution Through the Clinton Years

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by Clara Nieto
     
 

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In Masters of War, Clara Nieto adeptly presents the parallel histories of the countries of Latin America, histories that are intertwined, each reflecting the United States’ "coherent policy of intervention" set into motion by the Monroe Doctrine. As the value of this continued policy comes increasingly into question, Nieto argues for the need to evaluate the

Overview

In Masters of War, Clara Nieto adeptly presents the parallel histories of the countries of Latin America, histories that are intertwined, each reflecting the United States’ "coherent policy of intervention" set into motion by the Monroe Doctrine. As the value of this continued policy comes increasingly into question, Nieto argues for the need to evaluate the alarming precedent set in Latin America: the institution of client dictatorships, the roles played by the interests of U.S. corporations, the enormous tolls taken on civilian populations, and the irreversible disruption of regional stability.
Drawing from an impressive array of documents and sources as well as from her unique first-hand insights as a participant in crucial meetings and negotiations in the region from the mid-1960s through the mid-1980s, Nieto chronicles the Cuban Revolution, the CIA-sponsored coup against popularly elected President Allende in Chile, the U.S. invasions of Panama and Grenada, U.S. support for the cultivation and training of paramilitary death squads in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Colombia, as well as similarly severe but less well-known situations in other countries such as Uruguay, Venezuela, Argentina, Peru, Bolivia, Honduras, and Guatemala.
Masters of War offers, from an informed perspective, perhaps for the first time, a distanced, objective analysis of recent Latin American history. Clara Nieto’s depth of knowledge and understanding is an invaluable resource at a time when the media is seen as unapologetically aligned with the interests of major corporations and policymakers, and the American public has reached a new height of apprehension regarding the intentions behind and consequences of its government’s policies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781609800499
Publisher:
Seven Stories Press
Publication date:
01/04/2011
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
793 KB

Meet the Author

CLARA NIETO was a career diplomat who served in the Colombian mission to the United Nations from 1960–1967; was head of the Colombian Delegation at UNESCO, Paris, from 1967–1970; was Colombian Chargé d'Affairs in Yugoslavia form 1970 to 1976; was Colombian Ambassador to Cuba from 1977–1980; and from 1984–1986 was Director of UNESCO's regional office for Latin America and the Caribbean in Havana. Her writing has appeared in many Colombian newspapers including El Tiempo, El Espectador, El Mundo, and NACLA in the United States. Nieto lives in New York City and Bogotà, Colombia.

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Masters of War: Latin American and U. S. Aggression from the Cuban Revolution through the Clinton Years 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another excretory work from H. Zinn and his toadies. Simply a soapbox winge that America is the cause of all the world's problems not worthy of being considered history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this excellent history of Latin America since 1959, the Colombian diplomat Clara Nieto surveys the continent country by country, showing how the US state has consistently intervened in their internal affairs. The alliance of neo-liberalism and social democracy internally, the USA and the EU externally, has kept capitalism in power in Latin America. So half its people live in worsening poverty, a third are unemployed, and foreign debt totals $400 billion. Nieto focuses on the Cuban revolution and its effects. In March 1959, President Eisenhower ordered CIA sabotage and terrorism against Cuba. Kennedy was worse: Nieto writes, ¿His policies opposing the Revolution were more aggressive than Eisenhower¿s.¿ Two days before the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, US planes bombed Cuba¿s cities, under Kennedy¿s orders. Kennedy started the US policy of counter-insurgency in Latin America (and Africa and Asia), supporting death squads and military dictatorships. Nieto shows how the US state sponsored counterrevolutionary wars in Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Guatemala and Chile. Johnson carried on Kennedy¿s policies: he backed the generals¿ fascist coup in Brazil in 1964, and attacked the Dominican Republic in 1965. Nieto depicts Reagan¿s wars - occupying Honduras, arming the death squads of El Salvador, running the Contras¿ terrorist war against Nicaragua, attacking Grenada - and Bush¿s attack on Panama. The US state has never ceased its illegal, terrorist attacks on Cuba. The New York Times reported in 1983 how the head of a Miami-based anti-Cuban terrorist group admitted in a US court that he had taken germs to Cuba in 1980, proving Cuba¿s accusations of CIA biological warfare against Cuba. The US state made Armando Valladares - a former Batista police officer and convicted terrorist - ambassador and president of its delegation to the UN Human Rights Commission. But the Commission¿s 1989 report refuted all the US slanders about Cuba¿s torture and abuse of political prisoners. The world knows now who tortures and abuses political prisoners detained without charge or trial. Nieto¿s final chapter examines how Cuba has survived and kept its revolution going. The key is that its people, determined to defend their democracy, independence and sovereignty, actively prevent the counter-revolution from organising.