Math Fables: Lessons that Count

Overview


From 1 to 10, these "lessons that count" are math magic for learning addition and subtraction.

Greg Tang has built his career as an author and math missionary on the power of creative problem solving. Now, through winsome "fables" about concepts that are relevant to the very youngest math learners -- sharing, teamwork, etc. -- Greg encourages kids to see the basics of addition and subtraction in entirely new ways. Fresh, fun, and most of all, ...

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Overview


From 1 to 10, these "lessons that count" are math magic for learning addition and subtraction.

Greg Tang has built his career as an author and math missionary on the power of creative problem solving. Now, through winsome "fables" about concepts that are relevant to the very youngest math learners -- sharing, teamwork, etc. -- Greg encourages kids to see the basics of addition and subtraction in entirely new ways. Fresh, fun, and most of all, inspiring, MATH FABLES is perfect for launching young readers on the road to math success!

A series of rhymes about animals introduces counting and grouping numbers, as well as examples of such behaviors as cooperation, friendship, and appreciation.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

School Library Journal
(March 1, 2004; 0-439-45399-2)

PreS-Gr 1-Complete with catchy titles such as "Trying Times," "Midnight Snack," and "Gone with the Wind," each brief fable told in rhyme ends with a moral. Except for some suggested activities at the end, there are no math problems or puzzles to solve. Rather, the author strives to help readers learn how to see a number as a combination of smaller groups of numbers in order to lay "the foundation for place value" and as a "first step to building strong computational skills." The text and perky, computer-generated cartoons show youngsters that there are many different ways of putting numbers together. For example, in "Going Nuts," four squirrels frolic in autumn leaves until they realize they need provisions for winter. One begins to explore while three sit on a branch, frightened with worry. Next, "2 squirrels raced to gather nuts" while "the other 2- buried them in stashes underground." Finally, "all 4 slept very well that night,/no longer feeling scared./They learned it's wise to plan ahead/and always be prepared!" Cahoon keeps the different combinations together by enclosing them in ovals, visually emphasizing that although the groupings may look different, they still add up to four. Featuring words like "sultry," "wholeheartedly," and "procrastinate," the enriching vocabulary is an added bonus. A fine addition to math shelves.-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community College, CT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Publishers Weekly
(February 23, 2004; 0-439-45399-2)

A number of spring picture books add to popular series. Continuing to make arithmetic fun, Math Fables by Greg Tang, illus. by Heather Cahoon, offers 10 rhymes about animals that teach a life lesson while demonstrating basic addition. For the number seven, "Gone with the Wind" traces the path of monarch butterflies to Mexico, using every possible combination of addends (5+2; 6+1; etc.): "Their journey would be very far,/ a thousand miles or more./ The monarchs flew both day and night/ in groups of 3 and 4." In addition, Tang extends readers' vocabulary ("albeit," "prudent," "sultry"). Cahoon's computer-generated illustrations once again bring personality and charm to the animals and settings. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Booklist
(February 1, 2004; 0-439-45399-2)

PreS-Gr. 1. As he did in Math Appeal BKL F 15 03, Tang introduces children to the wonders of grouping numbers. Each fable tells a rhyming story in a two- or four-page spread, with each setup more complex than the last. One of the first fables tells of two young birds. One bird takes wing and hits the ground, and the other one falls from the sky and nearly drowns. When the birds practice together, however, they both learn to fly. In another story, 10 beavers leave for work, regrouping and reorganizing their numbers all day. A final page offers ideas to help more accelerated learners combine groups of numbers in various ways. The bright, shiny artwork, executed on a computer, sometimes appears literally rough around the edges, but the target audience will like the illustrations' happy cartoon look. Like Tang's other books, this will engage children, who may not even realize they are learning. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2004 Booklist

Publishers Weekly
A number of spring picture books add to popular series. Continuing to make arithmetic fun, Math Fables by Greg Tang, illus. by Heather Cahoon, offers 10 rhymes about animals that teach a life lesson while demonstrating basic addition. For the number seven, "Gone with the Wind" traces the path of monarch butterflies to Mexico, using every possible combination of addends (5+2; 6+1; etc.): "Their journey would be very far,/ a thousand miles or more./ The monarchs flew both day and night/ in groups of 3 and 4." In addition, Tang extends readers' vocabulary ("albeit," "prudent," "sultry"). Cahoon's computer-generated illustrations once again bring personality and charm to the animals and settings. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Bright, bold, attractive illustrations and a rhyming text make this much more than a simple counting book. Youngsters will have to give some thought to the math concepts, but they will do this almost effortlessly as they follow the actions of the appealing creatures featured in this book. Parents and teachers will want to read the "Author's Note" which points out that the fables, while first emphasizing size and order, continue on to show the numbers in different ways. This is meant to encourage kids to think about groups and place value and to build computational skills. For example, the section titled "Midnight Snack" shows 5 raccoons. They spot a full garbage can. "2 quickly grabbed it by the rim/and pulled it on its side./'We're going to have a feast tonight!'/ the other 3 all cried." Then 4 raccoons stop to give thanks and the youngest 1 puts down his food and the 5 are back together again. 2004, Scholastic Press, Ages 3 to 6.
—Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Complete with catchy titles such as "Trying Times," "Midnight Snack," and "Gone with the Wind," each brief fable told in rhyme ends with a moral. Except for some suggested activities at the end, there are no math problems or puzzles to solve. Rather, the author strives to help readers learn how to see a number as a combination of smaller groups of numbers in order to lay "the foundation for place value" and as a "first step to building strong computational skills." The text and perky, computer-generated cartoons show youngsters that there are many different ways of putting numbers together. For example, in "Going Nuts," four squirrels frolic in autumn leaves until they realize they need provisions for winter. One begins to explore while three sit on a branch, frightened with worry. Next, "2 squirrels raced to gather nuts" while "the other 2- buried them in stashes underground." Finally, "all 4 slept very well that night,/no longer feeling scared./They learned it's wise to plan ahead/and always be prepared!" Cahoon keeps the different combinations together by enclosing them in ovals, visually emphasizing that although the groupings may look different, they still add up to four. Featuring words like "sultry," "wholeheartedly," and "procrastinate," the enriching vocabulary is an added bonus. A fine addition to math shelves.-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community College, CT Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439453998
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/1/2004
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 127,516
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 10.16 (h) x 0.45 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A great way to help children learn math skills

    A great book to help children learn math skills. With great illustrations and engaging stories to encourage counting, grouping and even adding.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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