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Math for All Seasons (Mind-Stretching Math Riddles Series)
     

Math for All Seasons (Mind-Stretching Math Riddles Series)

3.0 2
by Gregory Tang, Harry Briggs (Illustrator), Gerg Tang
 

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Greg Tang follows up the fun, innovative, New York Times bestseller GRAPES OF MATH with his second uproariously punny math book -- this time with a theme of seasons and a focus on groups of fives.

Your challenge is to find the sum
Without counting one by one
Why not count? It's much too slow --
Adding is the way to go!
Make clever groups before you

Overview


Greg Tang follows up the fun, innovative, New York Times bestseller GRAPES OF MATH with his second uproariously punny math book -- this time with a theme of seasons and a focus on groups of fives.

Your challenge is to find the sum
Without counting one by one
Why not count? It's much too slow --
Adding is the way to go!
Make clever groups before you start --
Then add them in a way that's smart!
MATH FOR ALL SEASONS will challenge every kid -- and every parent -- to open their minds and solve problems in new and unexpected ways. By looking for patterns, symmetries, and familiar number combinations within eye-catching pictures, math will become easier, quicker, and more fun than anyone could have imagined!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Move over, worksheets and pencils! The team behind The Grapes of Math once again proves that posing number problems through verse and vivid pictures is a powerful path to math learning. With tides like "Raining Cats and Frogs" and "Amazing Grain,” the poems span the seasons, encouraging readers to look for patterns and symmetry in the playful illustrations. Each poem poses a "how many” question about the accompanying picture of seasonal items, from acorns and hatching chicks to dandelions and icicles. Several creatively convey facts about their timely topics, as in "Not-So-Dandy Lions": 'These lions are a stubborn breed--/'There's never just a single weed./The trouble starts when they get loose They catch a breeze and reproduce!” the simple verse then hints at effective strategies to make counting faster and easier. With 10 dandelions pictured on the opposing page, Tang poses the question “How many plants are still in bloom?" then suggests: "Count by fives the plants you see,/Then subtract the seedy three!" Briggs sprinkles his computer-generated artwork with fun-loving graphics throughout. Summer-themed poems show a pigeon wearing swim goggles diving into a bird bath and a lemonade-drinking butterfly. Any time of year is a good time to delve into these pictorial puzzles.
--Publishers Weekly, Nov. 26th, 2001

Although these math riddles can be fun, there is a major discrepancy between the character of the book and the age group it is intended for. Tang's versified math problems encourage readers to tackle adition and subtraction questions in their head as well as on the page. With conceptual thinking involved, it is reasonable to peg this for six-to-ten-year-olds, despite the ultimate simplicity of the adding and subtracting. Readers have to learn to group objects--and the solutions at the end of the book explain any problems that have been too elusive or confounding. But it is difficult to see beyond these single-case scenarios; the groupings of objects used by Tang are too neat to be applied to the real world, with all its asymmetries. More damaging are the childish illustrations--cutesy, singing gingerbread men, hyper-cuddly bunnies--and the uninspired verse: "Canals and dikes and windmills, too, / Grassy fields and skies of blue. / In Holland spring's the time of year / For pretty flowers far and near." Difficult to imagine ten-year-olds enamored of that.
--Kirkus Reviews, January 15th 2002

Tang again offers a high-order thinking-skills approach to arithmetic (The Grapes of Math, BCCB 3/01), this time concentrating on addition and a dash of subtraction. Sixteen double spreads feature seasonal images that invite readers to group objects rather than simply count them and a rhyme that offers a hint on how to cluster images for shortcut calculation. Pancake-flat computer artwork in a saturated palette has the compositional sophistication of a dime-store coloring book. It's really function that's at issue here, however, and pertinent Easter eggs, jack-o'- lanterns, drippy ice cream cones and icicles are carefully deployed for visual bun- cuing and manipulation. Tang concludes with four pages of solutions to his riddles, with reduced scenes displaying his groupings, and although he intends to help “kids to think through problems rather than relying on formulas and memorization,” his one-solution approach is unnecessarily limiting. This volume's real merit will depend on children's motivation to devise approaches of their own.
--Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, March 2002

Another calculated success from the creators of Grapes of Math. Each spread features a crisp, bright illustration with a rhymed couplet that poses a counting task and gives a suggested strategy. The 16 riddles take readers through the seasons beginning with tulips and hatching chicks in springtime and ending with snowflakes and gift boxes in winter. This ambitious wo

bn.com
Mathematically challenged? Never fear -- Greg Tang is here! The creator of the popular and award-winning The Grapes of Math, is back with another stellar collection of math riddles disguised as poems (or is it the other way around?). Kids are encouraged use some creative problem solving -- instead of simply adding items one by one, they learn to group them to make adding easier and to look for patterns that will lead to additional shortcuts. Bright computer-generated illustrations fill these pages. Each layout illustrates a season: For summer sunning, butterflies are shown drinking lemonade and flying about, as the text reads, "How many dots adorn their wings?/See what clever thinking brings/There is a mate for every one/Make groups of ten and you'll be done!" Best of all, solutions are illustrated and explained at the end of the book. A fabulous gift for reluctant learners and innovative teachers.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Move over, worksheets and pencils! The team behind The Grapes of Math once again proves that posing number problems through verse and vivid pictures is a powerful path to math learning. With titles like "Raining Cats and Frogs" and "Amazing Grain," the poems span the seasons, encouraging readers to look for patterns and symmetry in the playful illustrations. Each poem poses a "how many" question about the accompanying picture of seasonal items, from acorns and hatching chicks to dandelions and icicles. Several creatively convey facts about their timely topics, as in "Not-So-Dandy Lions": "These lions are a stubborn breedD / There's never just a single weed./ The trouble starts when they get loose,/ They catch a breeze and reproduce!" the simple verse then hints at effective strategies to make counting faster and easier. With 10 dandelions pictured on the opposing page, Tang poses the question "How many plants are still in bloom?" then suggests: "Count by fives the plants you see,/ Then subtract the seedy three!" Briggs sprinkles his computer-generated artwork with fun-loving graphics throughout. Summer-themed poems show a pigeon wearing swim goggles diving into a bird bath and a lemonade-drinking butterfly. Any time of year is a good time to delve into these pictorial puzzles. Ages 7-10. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Greg Tang is interested in helping young students learn creative problem solving strategies and in cultivating an interest in math. These are word problems, but presented with graphics that put a whole new spin on problem solving. Three basic techniques are presented¾one is grouping numbers to make adding easier; the second is subtracting to add; and the third is to see patterns and symmetries. All of this is accomplished with a poem and an illustration. It's raining cats and frogs. Each of the four umbrellas has a different number of dots on it. The task is to count all of the dots. The hint provided is to group them in sums of ten. There are sixteen problems, each a spread with a very colorful illustration. The large scale makes it easy to focus on the problem at hand. Icicles need to be counted, as well as party hats, chicks, leaves and acorns. This book is successful because the language, design and illustrations all support the mission. If that's not enough, there are answers at the back of the book. 2002, Scholastic Press, $16.95. Ages 5 to 8. Reviewer: Kristin Harris AGES: 5 6 7 8
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-Another calculated success from the creators of Grapes of Math (Scholastic, 2001). Each spread features a crisp, bright illustration with a rhymed couplet that poses a counting task and gives a suggested strategy. The 16 riddles take readers through the seasons beginning with tulips and hatching chicks in springtime and ending with snowflakes and gift boxes in winter. This ambitious work encourages creative problem solving in several ways. Youngsters learn to pair or group items to make adding easier, subtract to add (such as two 5s are 10 minus 2 equals 8), and to look for patterns and symmetries that provide further shortcuts to addition. Since most children are inclined to count items one by one, Tang's book will present them with a new tactic: recognizing visual groupings (twos, threes, and fives) to make adding faster and more accurate, and provide them with some training in it. Another plus is that the strategies learned early in the book are used more than once, thereby reinforcing the skills. Solutions are illustrated and explained at the back of the book. Though only one is offered for each scenario, it is possible that readers might find alternate, yet equally valid groupings. Math's appealing computer artwork, poetry, holiday and seasonal themes, and challenges add up to a winning combination.-Barbara Auerbach, New York City Public Schools Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Although these math riddles can be fun, there is a major discrepancy between the character of the book and the age group it is intended for. Tang's versified math problems encourage readers to tackle addition and subtraction questions in their head as well as on the page. With conceptual thinking involved, it is reasonable to peg this for six- to ten-year-olds, despite the ultimate simplicity of the adding and subtracting. Readers have to learn to group objects in counterintuitive ways-up and down, say, rather than left to right, or fill in blanks and then subtract-and the solutions at the end of the book explain any problems that have been too elusive or confounding. But it is difficult to see beyond these single-case scenarios; the groupings of objects used by Tang are too neat to be applied to the real world, with all its asymmetries. More damaging are the childish illustrations-cutesy, singing gingerbread men, hyper-cuddly bunnies-and the uninspired verse: "Canals and dikes and windmills, too, / Grassy fields and skies of blue. / In Holland spring's the time of year / For pretty flowers far and near." Difficult to imagine ten-year-olds enamored of that. (Picture book. 6-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439210423
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/2002
Series:
Mind-Stretching Math Riddles Series
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.34(w) x 10.34(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Math For All Seasons 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TheReadingWriter More than 1 year ago
Another math/story riddle book by Greg Tang. Some math exercises are incorporated into a picture book for preschool/ kindegarten kids getting ready for first grade. At least I think they'd be able to do them, perhaps with a couple run-throughs. Not so hard as to make kids lose confidence, I think.