Mathematical Scandals

( 3 )

Overview

Why isn't there a Nobel Prize in Mathematics? Why was the first woman mathematician murdered? Was Einstein's first wife the real brains behind his theory? In this highly readable volume of vignettes, coupled with factual background, Pappas has assembled fascinating stories of intrigue and the bizarre - in short, the human background of the history of mathematics.

Behind the arcane realm of mathematical numbers, equations, and solutions lies the sometimes sordid world...

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Overview

Why isn't there a Nobel Prize in Mathematics? Why was the first woman mathematician murdered? Was Einstein's first wife the real brains behind his theory? In this highly readable volume of vignettes, coupled with factual background, Pappas has assembled fascinating stories of intrigue and the bizarre - in short, the human background of the history of mathematics.

Behind the arcane realm of mathematical numbers, equations, and solutions lies the sometimes sordid world of real people, whose rivalries and deceptions are at odds with the mathematician's reputation for clear thinking and scientific detachment. In this highly readable volume, Pappas livens up the world of mathematics with 29 fascinating stories about its little-known scandals. 20 photos. 30 illustrations. 192 pp.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781884550102
  • Publisher: Wide World Publishing/Tetra
  • Publication date: 4/28/1997
  • Pages: 151
  • Sales rank: 818,498
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.51 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction
The irrational number cover-up 1
Ada Byron Lovelace's addiction 7
Exposing L'Hospital's claim to fame 16
Whose solids are they anyway? 22
The paranoia of Kurt Godel 26
Newton's apple never was 35
Mathematical "Brooklyn Bridge" 39
Christians murder Hypatia 44
Cantor driven to nervous breakdown 50
The mathematician who pleaded insanity 59
The scandalous treatment of Alan Turing 63
Fourier cooks his own goose 68
The secret work of Carl Gauss 73
Female mathematician crashes the old boy's club 80
Newton was no sweet cookie 86
Where's the Nobel Prize in mathematics? 96
Was Galois jinxed? 102
I sleep therefore I think 109
The feud over who invented calculus 115
The truth about Einstein & Maric - It's all relative 121
Cardano vs. Tartaglia - Who was maligned? 131
Bibliography 139
Index 145
About the author 151
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2001

    OK at an introductory level, but tighten up the spelling!

    As a compilation of very short stories of mathematician biographies, the book is OK. I suppose it's nice to see at least one attempt at putting the human element to the field of mathematics. However, with only a few pages devoted to each individual, the book is probably better suited for generating interest within a younger crowd. It would have been helpful to see an overall timeline or summary diagram showing the interrelations among the individuals and topics rather than just a series of discrete stories. I was disappointed to see numerous grammatical and spelling errors in the book (I counted 5 alone in the first 40 pages). One would think that the demanding exactitude mathematicians must possess when presenting their own theorems and proofs would carry over into a simple grammar/spell check. Unfortunately, the errors not only help to underscore the stereotypical division between technical and nontechnical people, but they don't set a good example for young students.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2001

    poor continution and development of plot

    this book promises to be intriging through the title and chapter titles but never delivers. there it too much waiting for the story to climax and when it does it is too short and un detailed very bad write indeed

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2000

    Thoroughly entertaining!

    Very good for the novice mathematics history buff. This title contains several anti-Newton titles and much controversy in general. It's a real 'Weekly World News' for any <i>historia mathematica amans</i> .

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