Mathematics in Population Biology

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $49.08
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 46%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $49.08   
  • New (6) from $54.98   
  • Used (3) from $49.08   

Overview

The formulation, analysis, and re-evaluation of mathematical models in population biology has become a valuable source of insight to mathematicians and biologists alike. This book presents an overview and selected sample of these results and ideas, organized by biological theme rather than mathematical concept, with an emphasis on helping the reader develop appropriate modeling skills through use of well-chosen and varied examples.

Part I starts with unstructured single species population models, particularly in the framework of continuous time models, then adding the most rudimentary stage structure with variable stage duration. The theme of stage structure in an age-dependent context is developed in Part II, covering demographic concepts, such as life expectation and variance of life length, and their dynamic consequences. In Part III, the author considers the dynamic interplay of host and parasite populations, i.e., the epidemics and endemics of infectious diseases. The theme of stage structure continues here in the analysis of different stages of infection and of age-structure that is instrumental in optimizing vaccination strategies.

Each section concludes with exercises, some with solutions, and suggestions for further study. The level of mathematics is relatively modest; a "toolbox" provides a summary of required results in differential equations, integration, and integral equations. In addition, a selection of Maple worksheets is provided.

The book provides an authoritative tour through a dazzling ensemble of topics and is both an ideal introduction to the subject and reference for researchers.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

SIAM Review - Linda J.S. Allen
Mathematics in Population Biology provides a rigorous mathematical treatment of a wide variety of [models]. The attention to mathematical details is emphasized much more in this book than in many other popular mathematical biology textbooks and will be of particular interest to mathematicians. . . . In addition, this book is an excellent reference for researchers interested in learning more about the mathematics behind the models of population biology.
SIAM Review - Linda J. S. Allen
Mathematics in Population Biology provides a rigorous mathematical treatment of a wide variety of [models]. The attention to mathematical details is emphasized much more in this book than in many other popular mathematical biology textbooks and will be of particular interest to mathematicians. . . . In addition, this book is an excellent reference for researchers interested in learning more about the mathematics behind the models of population biology.
From the Publisher

Mathematics in Population Biology provides a rigorous mathematical treatment of a wide variety of [models]. The attention to mathematical details is emphasized much more in this book than in many other popular mathematical biology textbooks and will be of particular interest to mathematicians. . . . In addition, this book is an excellent reference for researchers interested in learning more about the mathematics behind the models of population biology."--Linda J. S. Allen, SIAM Review
SIAM Review
Mathematics in Population Biology provides a rigorous mathematical treatment of a wide variety of [models]. The attention to mathematical details is emphasized much more in this book than in many other popular mathematical biology textbooks and will be of particular interest to mathematicians. . . . In addition, this book is an excellent reference for researchers interested in learning more about the mathematics behind the models of population biology.
— Linda J. S. Allen
SIAM Review
Mathematics in Population Biology provides a rigorous mathematical treatment of a wide variety of [models]. The attention to mathematical details is emphasized much more in this book than in many other popular mathematical biology textbooks and will be of particular interest to mathematicians. . . . In addition, this book is an excellent reference for researchers interested in learning more about the mathematics behind the models of population biology.
— Linda J. S. Allen
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Read an Excerpt

Mathematics in Population Biology


By Horst R. Thieme

Princeton University Press

Copyright © 2003 Princeton University Press
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-691-09291-1


Chapter One

SOME GENERAL REMARKS ON MATHEMATICAL MODELING

Modeling is an attempt to see the wood for the trees. A model is a simplification or abstraction of reality (whatever that is), separating the important from the irrelevant. Actually, modeling is a part of our existence. If we want to be philosophical, we could say that we do not perceive reality as it is, but only realize a model our mind has designed from sensory stimuli and their interpretation. It seems that certain animal species perceive different models of reality which, compared to ours, are based more on hearing and smell than on sight. Many philosophers have had much deeper thoughts on this problem than I present here; following Plato's famous allegory of the cave we may say that we only see the shadows of reality, or, following Kant, that we see the phenomena rather than the noumena. St Paul (1st letter to the Corinthians, 13:9), puts it this way: We obtain our knowledge in parts, and we prophesy in parts. St Paul, of course, had a broader and deeper reality in mind than we are concerned with here, but if we apply his statement to a more restricted reality, we may (rather freely) paraphrase it as follows: We obtain our knowledge from models, and we make our predictions on thebasis of models.

Since, in a wide sense, we are modeling anyway, modeling in the strict sense is the purposeful attempt to replace one model (the so-called "real world," which we typically accept without questioning) by another, deliberate, model which may give us more insight. Essentially, there seem to be two incentives for doing so: either the "real-world" model is too complex to obtain the desired insight and so is replaced by a simpler or more abstract one. Or the "real-world" model does not allow certain experiments for ethical, practical or other reasons and is replaced by a model in which all kinds of changes can be readily made and their consequences studied without causing harm.

The word model presumably traces back to the Latin word modulus, which means "little measure" (Merriam-Webster, 1994), alluding to a small-scale physical representation of a large object (e.g., a model airplane).

Mathematical modeling uses symbolic rather than physical representations, unleashing the power of mathematical analysis to increase scientific understanding. It can conveniently be divided into three stages (cf. Lin, Segel, 1974, 1988).

1. Model formulation: the translation of the scientific problem into mathematical terms. 2. Model analysis: the mathematical solution of the model thus created. 3. Model interpretation and verification: the interpretation of the solution and its empirical verification in terms of the original problem.

All three steps are important and useful. Already the first step-model formulation-can lead to considerable insight. For building a mathematical model, one needs clear-cut assumptions about the operating mechanisms, and it often turns out to be an unpleasant surprise that the old model-the "real world"-is far less understood than one thought. In many cases the modeling procedure-at least if one chooses parameters that are meaningful-already teaches what further knowledge is needed in order to apply the mathematical model successfully; the model analysis and its interpretation help to determine to what extent and precision new information and new data have to be collected.

Analytic and numerical tools allow the extrapolation of present states of the mathematical model into the future and, sometimes, into the past. Assumptions, initial states, and parameters can easily be changed and the different outcomes compared. So, models can be used to identify trends or to estimate uncertainties in forecasts. Different detection, prevention and control strategies can be tested and evaluated.

While the model analysis may require sophisticated analytic or computational methods, mathematical modeling ideally leads to conceptual insight, which can be expressed without elaborate mathematics.

A model is, purposefully, a simplification or abstraction; very often it is an oversimplification or overabstraction. Insight obtained from a model should be checked against empirical evidence and common sense. It can also be checked against insight from other models: how much does the model's behavior depend on the degree of complexity, on the form of the model equations, on the choice of the parameters? Dealing with a concrete problem, a modeler should work with a whole scale of models starting from one which is as simple as possible to obtain some (hopefully) basic insight and then adding complexity and checking whether the insight is confirmed. Starting with a complex model has the risk that the point will be missed because it is obscured by all the details.

The use of a whole range of models also educates the modeler on how critically qualitative and quantitative results depend on the assumptions one has made. A mathematical modeler should become a guardian keeping him/herself and others from jumping to premature conclusions.

When modeling concrete phenomena, there is typically a dilemma between incorporating enough complexity (or realism) on the one hand and keeping the model tractable on the other. In some cases the modeler feels forced to add a lot of detail to her/his model in order to grasp all the important features and ends up with a huge number of unknown parameters, which may never be known even approximately and cannot be determined by fitting procedures either. Such a mathematical model will be of limited value for quantitative and maybe even qualitative forecasts, but still has the other benefits described above.

Mathematical modeling has its place in all sciences. This book, according to the interests of the author, concerns mathematical models in the biosciences, or rather a very small area within the biosciences, namely population biology. Another restriction is the one to deterministic models (as opposed to stochastic models), which neglect the influence of random events. To some degree one can dispute whether stochastic models are more realistic than deterministic models; there is still the possibility that everything is deterministic, but just incredibly complex. In this case, stochasticity would simply be a certain way to deal with the fact that there are many factors we do not know. Stochastic models are theoretically more satisfying as they count individuals with integer numbers, while deterministic models, usually differential or difference equations, have to allow population sizes that are not integers. (This actually is of no concern if population size is modeled as biomass and not as number of individuals, but the latter is not always appropriate.) While a typical tool of deterministic-model analysis consists of discussing large-time limits, stochastic models take account of the truism that nothing lasts forever and make it possible to analyze the expected time until extinction-a concept that has no counterpart in deterministic models. In many cases, deterministic models can theoretically be justified as approximations of stochastic models for large populations sizes; however, the population size needed to make the approximation good enough may be unrealistically large. Nevertheless, deterministic models have the values which we described above, as long as one keeps their limitations in mind. The latter particularly concerns predictions, which are of very limited use in this uncertain world if no confidence intervals for the predicted phenomena are provided.

Bibliographic Remarks

Other discussions of mathematical modeling can be found in Lin, Segel (1974, 1988), Hethcote,VanArk (1992), Kooijman (2000), and Kirkilionis et al. (2002). Section 1.1 in Lin and Segel's On the Nature of Applied Mathematics more generally speaks about the scope, purpose, and practice of applied mathematics (also in comparison with pure mathematics and theoretical science), while Section 1.6 in Hethcote, Van Ark (1992), Purposes and limitations of epidemiological modeling, refers to the modeling of infectious diseases and of the AIDS epidemic in particular. Their respective remarks, however, easily specialize or generalize to mathematical modeling. A "playful" approach to the role of modeling and mathematics in the sciences can be found in Sigmund (1993, Chapters 1, 3, and 9). The idea that a concrete problem should be addressed by a chain of models has been realized in a textbook by Mesterton-Gibbons (1992), who calls this the layered approach. Section 1.2 in Kooijman (2000) shares the philosophical touch of this chapter; the outlooks are rather similar for modeling itself, but quite different in the meta-modeling aspects. For a discussion of deterministic versus stochastic models see the papers by Nasell (n.d.) and Section 1.6 in the book by Gurney, Nisbet (1998). Genetic and evolutionary aspects of population biology are not touched on at all in this book, and I refer to the books by Bürger (2000), Charlesworth (1980, 1994), Farkas (2001), and Hofbauer, Sigmund (1988, 1998) as sources for their mathematical modeling and analysis.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Mathematics in Population Biology by Horst R. Thieme Copyright © 2003 by Princeton University Press . Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface
Ch. 1 Some General Remarks on Mathematical Modeling 1
Pt. 1 Basic Population Growth Models 5
Ch. 2 Birth, Death, and Migration 7
Ch. 3 Unconstrained Population Growth for Single Species 13
Ch. 4 Von Bertalanffy Growth of Body Size 33
Ch. 5 Classic Models of Density-Dependent Population Growth for Single Species 37
Ch. 6 Sigmoid Growth 51
Ch. 7 The Allee Effect 65
Ch. 8 Nonautonomous Population Growth: Asymptotic Equality of Population Sizes 75
Ch. 9 Discrete-Time Single-Species Models 81
Ch. 10 Dynamics of an Aquatic Population Interacting with a Polluted Environment 107
Ch. 11 Population Growth Under Basic Stage Structure 151
Pt. 2 Stage Transitions and Demographics 183
Ch. 12 The Transition Through a Stage 185
Ch. 13 Stage Dynamics with Given Input 211
Ch. 14 Demographics in an Unlimiting Constant Environment 239
Ch. 15 Some Demographic Lessons from Balanced Exponential Growth 255
Ch. 16 Some Nonlinear Demographics 273
Pt. 3 Host-Parasite Population Growth: Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases 281
Ch. 17 Background 283
Ch. 18 The Simplified Kermack-McKendrick Epidemic Model 293
Ch. 19 Generalization of the Mass-Action Law of Infection 305
Ch. 20 The Kermack-McKendrick Epidemic Model with Variable Infectivity 311
Ch. 21 SEIR ([approaches]S) Type Endemic Models for "Childhood Diseases" 317
Ch. 22 Age-Structured Models for Endemic Diseases and Optimal Vaccination Strategies 341
Ch. 23 Endemic Models with Multiple Groups or Populations 383
Pt. 4 Toolbox 419
App. A Ordinary Differential Equations 421
App. B Integration, Integral Equations, and Some Convex Analysis 453
App. C Some MAPLE Worksheets with Comments for Part 1 493
References 519
Index 537
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)