Matter and Motion

Matter and Motion

by James Clerk Maxwell
     
 

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This primer on physics, written in 1877 by James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879), the most eminent physicist of the nineteenth century, is an excellent introduction to Newtonian mechanics for students and educated lay readers.

Overview

This primer on physics, written in 1877 by James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879), the most eminent physicist of the nineteenth century, is an excellent introduction to Newtonian mechanics for students and educated lay readers.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Maxwell's lucid exposition of Newtonian mechanics. This is a reissue of the 1952 Dover edition which was a reprint of the SPCK edition of 1920. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486668956
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
11/04/1991
Series:
Dover Books on Physics Series
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
772,242
Product dimensions:
5.42(w) x 8.44(h) x 0.42(d)

Meet the Author

James Clerk Maxwell: In His Own Words — And Others
Dover reprinted Maxwell's Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1954, surely one of the first classics of scientific literature over a thousand pages in length to be given new life and accessibility to students and researchers as a result of the paperback revolution of the 1950s. Matter and Motion followed in 1991 and Theory of Heat in 2001.

Some towering figures in science have to speak for themselves. Such is James Clerk Maxwell (1813–1879), the Scottish physicist and mathematician who formulated the basic equations of classical electromagnetic theory.

In the Author's Own Words:
"We may find illustrations of the highest doctrines of science in games and gymnastics, in traveling by land and by water, in storms of the air and of the sea, and wherever there is matter in motion."

"The 2nd law of thermodynamics has the same degree of truth as the statement that if you throw a tumblerful of water into the sea, you cannot get the same tumblerful of water out again." — James Clerk Maxwell

Critical Acclaim for James Clerk Maxwell:
"From a long view of the history of mankind — seen from, say, ten thousand years from now — there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade." — Richard P. Feynman

"Maxwell's equations have had a greater impact on human history than any ten presidents." — Carl Sagan

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