Mattimeo (Redwall Series #3)

( 98 )

Overview

The third addition to the beloved Redwall series takes place during the summer of the Golden Plain. Preparation for a great feat are underway at Redwall Abbey, and the young mouse Mattimeo is contributing his share of the labors. But Mattimeo is the son of Mathius, the guardian of Redwall Abbey, and it is this fact that makes him the target of a fiendish kidnapping plot contrived by the vicious fox, Slagar the Cruel. When Mathias and his brave followers abandon heir homes and face enslavement for the return of ...
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Overview

The third addition to the beloved Redwall series takes place during the summer of the Golden Plain. Preparation for a great feat are underway at Redwall Abbey, and the young mouse Mattimeo is contributing his share of the labors. But Mattimeo is the son of Mathius, the guardian of Redwall Abbey, and it is this fact that makes him the target of a fiendish kidnapping plot contrived by the vicious fox, Slagar the Cruel. When Mathias and his brave followers abandon heir homes and face enslavement for the return of their children, the captive Mattimeo stands to prove his worth--and an unexpected hero is born.

About the Author:
Brian Jacques was born in Liverpool, England, in 1939. Growing up on the docks of Liverpool, he attended St. John's School. He went on to work as a radio show host, playwright, longshoreman, lorry driver, folk singer and comedian prior to his career as a writer. The father of two sons, Jacques enjoys walking his West Highland Terrier, Teddy and spends most of his time writing. A new Redwall book is introduced once every year.

For ages 9 and above.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The cruel fox Slagar steals a group of young woodland animals from Redwall Abbey--and among them is the great warrior mouse Matthias's son, Mattimeo. Slagar's motive is revenge, but as Matthias and a band of Woodlanders pursue their children's captors far across the desert to a horrible slave kingdom, Slagar attempts to destroy the champion Matthias to make his victory even sweeter. This final book in the Redwall trilogy is a truly thrilling conclusion to a swashbuckling, heroic adventure. Jacques's realistically drawn characters are full of personality, from the most humble bankvole to the foppish, lop-eared rabbit and the vicious, back-stabbing fox. The fierceness with which the Redwallers fight back to save their young lends the story credibility within the realm of the animal kingdom, while at the same time taking wonderful liberties with the imagination. Ages 10-14. (May)
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Redwall fans can get a double dose of the fantasy series: Mattimeo is the sequel to the original novel Redwall, while Long Patrol is the 10th in the sequence. Ages 10-up. (Feb.)
School Library Journal
In this sequel to the animal fantasy Redwall (1987), and its prequel, Mossflower , (1988, both Philomel), Slagar the Cruel, the fox with a twisted mind, repays the hospitality of his hosts, the goodhearted animals of Redwall Abbey, by kidnapping their children. Led by the young mouse Mattimeo (son of the warrior Matthias, hero of Redwall ), the children befriend their fellow captives Auma Badger and Jube Hedgehog as they march toward slavery in the underground rat kingdom of Malkarris. Meanwhile, Matthias leads a rescue mission that joins forces with the fathers of Auma and Jube, and despite brushes with defeat, their camaraderie and good humor never fail. ln a third strand of action, the animals left at Redwall Abbey are besieged by villainous crows. While the book is long and its cast large, the twists of plot and quick changes of scene sweep readers along a swift narrative current. Some readers, however, will question the unabashed celebration of a warrior code, the sentimental acceptance of battle deaths, and the predictable scoundrels. The characters, compared with those in Wind in the Willows , Watership Down , and the picture books of Beatrix Potter, are bland, remaining far too human to become that mythic hybrid of human and animal. Nevertheless, libraries with an audience for the previous books will want this one, too. --Margaret A. Chang, Buxton School, Williamstown, MA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780142302408
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 3/24/2003
  • Series: Redwall Series , #3
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 193,215
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.06 (w) x 7.77 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Meet the Author

BRIAN JACQUES was born and bred in Liverpool. At the age of fifteen he went to sea and travelled the world. He worked as a stand-up comedian and playwright and hosted his own programme, Jakestown, on Radio Merseyside. His bestselling Redwall books have captured readers all over the world and won universal praise. He died in 2011.

Biography

The drawings that open the chapters in a Redwall book may look sweet, but Brian Jacques' fantasies are not for the faint of heart. Adventure, peril, betrayal, and downright slaughter abound in these hefty novels about the creatures -- mice, hares, moles, badgers, and sparrows -- who inhabit Redwall Abbey in medieval England.

Brian Jacques has had a life nearly as exciting as that of some of his characters: After dropping out of school in his native Liverpool at the age of 15, he traveled the world as a merchant seaman, visiting ports from America to Asia. Upon returning to England, he held a wide variety of jobs, from railway fireman to boxer among them. In the 1960s, he and his two brothers formed the Liverpool Fishermen, a folksinging group. Jacques also tried his hand as a playwright, producing several stage plays -- Brown Bitter, Wet Nellies, Scouse – about native Liverpudlians.

The Redwall stories, which were to earn him legions of fans, were born out of his time as a volunteer storyteller at the Royal Wavertree School for the Blind in Liverpool. Jacques maintains that his detailed writing style was developed here; he was forced to be as descriptive as possible, so his audience would be able to experience his stories as if they could see. He created the first Redwall story as a gift to the children of the school, but never intended to publish it commercially. Fortunately for his many fans on both sides of the Atlantic, a friend sent his first manuscript to a publisher, and the rousing series took off in England in 1986 and in the U.S. the following year with Redwall.

Jacques takes issue with the notion that his books are "fantasy" fiction, a description that he says "smacks of swords and sorcery and dungeons and dragons. . . . I like to think of my books as old-fashioned adventures that happened ‘Once upon a time, long ago and far away.'"

The novels appeal generally to an audience of nine- to fifteen-year-olds, but have admirers both younger and older. The tales pivot on the conflict between good and evil; good invariably triumphs. Indeed, morality issues are always clear in Jacques' books: cruelty, greed, and avarice are eradicated in all forms; bravery, loyalty, and resourcefulness reap rewards aplenty. When it comes to characters, though, Jacques is less simplistic: Martin the Warrior, who through his courage and cunning rose to become the noblest hero in the land, is given to impetuousness, and the miscreant Cluny has both good and bad sides, a la Long John Silver.

For female readers, the Redwall books can be extra satisfying. His female creatures are as adventurous as the males: they don't faint into their male counterparts' arms, but explore, swashbuckle, and rescue on their own. In Mariel of Redwall (1991), the courageous girl mousechild Mariel, thrown overboard by the Gabool, leader of the evil pirate Searats, exacts her own brand of revenge.

Jacques' usually swift pace sometimes comes to a slogging halt with extraordinarily detailed descriptions of the legendary Redwall feasts, right down to the last acorn and drop of buttercup and honey cordial. But the author is redeemed by his delicate interweaving of subplots, his memorable menagerie, his rollicking sense of adventure, and his ability to transport the reader into an entirely different world, a world that, as one critic for The New York Times put it, "is both an incredible and ingratiating place, one to which readers will doubtless cheerfully return."

Good To Know

Brian Jacques wrote his books in longhand or on a manual typewriter, or, if the weather permits, outdoors.

Despite his success as an author, Jacques continued to broadcast the weekly radio show, Jakestown, that he hosted before he wrote the Redwall books.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      June 15, 1939
    2. Place of Birth:
      Liverpool, England
    1. Date of Death:
      February 5, 2011
    2. Place of Death:
      Liverpool, England
    1. Education:
      St. John’s School, Liverpool, England
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Book One

Slagar The Cruel

From the diary of John Churchmouse, historian and recorder of Redwall Abbey in Mossflower country.

We are close to the longest day of this season, the Summer of the Golden Plain. Today I took up my ledger and quill to write. It was cool and dim in the quiet of my little study indoors. With a restless spirit I sat, quill in paw, listening to the merry din outside in the sunlit cloisters of our Abbey. I could no longer stand the solitude, that happy sound of revelry drew me outside, yet there was still my recorder's duties to catch up with. Taking ledger and quill, I went out, up the stairs to the top of the outer wall, directly over the Warrior's Cottage, which is the gatehouse at the threshold of Redwall Abbey.

What a glorious day! The sky, painted special blue for the summer, had not a cloud or shadow anywhere, the hot eye of the sun caused bees to drone lazily, while grasshoppers chirruped and sawed endlessly. Out to the west, the great plains stretched away, shimmering and dancing with heat waves to the distant horizon, a breathtaking carpet of kingcup and dandelion mingled with cowslip, never had we ever seen so many yellow blossoms. Abbot Mordalfus named it the Summer of the Golden Plain. What a wise choice. I could see him ambling round the comer by the bell tower, his habit sleeves rolled well up, panting as he helped young woodlanders to carry out forms for seating at the great feast, our eighth season of peace and plenty since the wars.

Otters swam lazily in the Abbey pond, culling edible water plants (but mostly gambolling and playing. You know what otters are like). Small hedgehogs and moles werearound the back at the east side orchard. I could hear them singing as they gathered ripening berries or collected early damsons, pears, plums and apples, which the squirrels threw down to them from the high branches. Pretty little mousemaids and baby voles tittered and giggled whilst choosing table flowers, some making bright posies which they wore as hats. Frequently a sparrow would thrum past my head, carrying some morsel it had found or caught (though I cannot imagine any creature but a bird eating some of the questionable items a sparrow might find). The Foremole and his crew would arrive shortly to dig a baking pit. Meanwhile, the bustle and life of Redwall carried on below me, framed at the back by our beloved old Mossflower Woods. High, green and serene, with hardly a breeze to stir the mighty fastness of leafy boughs, oak, ash, elm, beech, yew, sycamore, hornbeam, fir and willow, mingled pale, dusty, dark and light green hues, the varied leaf shapes blending to shelter and frame the north and east sides of our walls.

Only two days to the annual festivities. I begin to feel like a giddy young woodlander again! However, being historian and recorder, I cannot in all dignity tuck up the folds of my habit and leap down among the merrymakers. I will finish my writings as quickly as possible then. Who knows, maybe I'll stroll down to join some of the elders in the cellar. I know they will be sampling the October ale and blackcurrant wine set by from other seasons, just to make sure it has kept its taste and temperature correctly, especially the elderberry wine of last autumn's pressing. You understand, of course, that I am doing this merely to help out old friends.

John Churchmouse (Recorder of Redwall Abbey, formerly of Saint Ninian's)

Afternoon sunlight slanted through the gaps in the ruined walls and roof of Saint Ninian's old church, highlighting the desolation of weed and thistle growing around broken, rotted pews. A small cloud of midges dispersed from dizzy circling as Slagar brushed by them. The fox peered through a broken door timber at the winding path of dusty brown which meandered aimlessly southward to meet the woodland fringe on the eastern edge.

Slagar watched silently, his ragged breath sucking in and out at the purple-red diamond-patterned skull mask which covered his entire head. When he spoke, it was a hoarse, rasping sound, as if he had received a terrible throat injury at some time.

"Here they come. Get that side door open, quick!"

A long coloured cart with rainbow-hued covering was pulled into the church by a dozen or so wretched creatures chained to the wagon shaft. A stoat sat on the driver's platform. He slashed at the haulers savagely with a long thin willow withe.

"Gee up, put yer backs into it, me beauties!"

The cart was followed by a rabble of ill-assorted vermin: stoats, ferrets and weasels, garbed the same as their comrades who were already waiting with Slagar.

Afternoon sunlight slanted through the gaps in the ruined walls and roof of Saint Ninian's old church, highlighting the desolation of weed and thistle growing around broken, rotted pews. A small cloud of midges dispersed from dizzy circling as Slagar brushed by them. The fox peered through a broken door timber at the winding path of dusty brown which meandered aimlessly southward to meet the woodland fringe on the eastern edge.

Slagar watched silently, his ragged breath sucking in and out at the purple-red diamond-patterned skull mask which covered his entire head. When he spoke, it was a hoarse, rasping sound, as if he had received a terrible throat injury at some time.

"Here they come. Get that side door open, quick!"

A long coloured cart with rainbow-hued covering was pulled into the church by a dozen or so wretched creatures chained to the wagon shaft. A stoat sat on the driver's platform. He slashed at the haulers savagely with a long thin willow withe.

"Gee up, put yer backs into it, me beauties!"

The cart was followed by a rabble of ill-assorted vermin: stoats, ferrets and weasels,...

Mattimeo. Copyright © by Brian Jacques. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 98 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(76)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 100 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2008

    Very good

    I'm reading my 5th redwall book right now. Mattiemo was my 2nd favorite behind Redwall. The reason I like these two books the most is because of the characters. Matthais, Jess, and Basil are ultimately my favorite. Some things I were wondering about are: are they in any other books, and why does Mr. Squirrel never do anything? It seems like Jaques forgot about him entirely, eg: 'I wish Jess and Sam were here. Nothing like a squirrel for gathering nuts.' Spectacular book, though.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Mattimeo (Redwall #3)

    This is a great book to read. I really enjoyed the third book of Brian Jacques's Redwall. It was fast pace, interesting, and very enjoyable. If you like the first two books, you will really enjoy this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2009

    Mattimeo

    When Mattimeo and his friends were stolen from their Abby home by a wicked fox bent on revenge. However Mathias (who was both guardian of the Abby and Mattimeo's father) and a band of woodland creatures went off to save their children. Along the way they met a few unlikely allies and then they finally found their children in a slaving kingdom. And it wasn't going down without a fight.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 29, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    An Epic Story of a Father and a Son

    When I first looked upon the Redwall series, I thought they looked interesting. Years later, I decided to pick up Redwall, the first book. It swept me away. The following summer, I picked up Mossflower. Yet again, the incredible writing style of Brian Jacques and his ability to combine both dialouge and descriptions effectively blew me out of my seat. Mossflower was superior to Redwall in every way. Then, in the fall I read Mattimeo. WOW. This book was just incredible. It was more emotional than the first two, and had everything. I sometimes wonder if it is just me, but this series seems to get better as it goes along.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book was written by my favorite author. Mattimeo was a wondeful and action-packed book that will keep you reading.The suspense will keep you reading.you will meet some new characters and some familiar ones too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2007

    One of the best in the series!

    The book starts of so peaceful, then becomes a tale of action. It was hard to stop reading, I even stood up until midnight. The book includes diffrent point of view and at the end of each point of view there was suspence. This book has humorous parts and scary ones too.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2007

    Not what I would have liked

    A good story by one of my favorite Authors. However, I found that this one lacked the fire and flow of the normal round of novels put out. Slow at points, pointless bits that dragged down the story. In essence, i would skip this book, as not a whole lot happens thats important to understand the rest of the storys (Like Martin the Warrior and Mossflower were important to read to get everything in Redwall).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2006

    Redwall!

    Mattimeo is one of the best Redwall books i have read. its exciting, scary, funny, and hard to put down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2006

    Awsome action filled

    The book is one of the greatest in the Redwall series. It is great for almost all ages. Unbelieveable Five Stars

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2006

    MATTIMEO

    Just like everybody else - five stars. I think that so far, Mattimeo is the best book in the Redwall series. Mattimeo, son of the Warrior Mouse Matthias, gets captured by Slagar the Fox along with is friends. Matthias and a few other characters, including the silly Basil Stag Hare and the skillful Jess the Squirrel set out to find them. Meanwhile, the other Redwallers stay at the abbey, and with the help of the smart Baby Rollo), they outwit invading birds.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2005

    AWESOME!!!

    I loved this book!It's a page turner for sure!When you're bored and need something to reed this is definately it!Brian describes everything perfectly so it's not difficult to imagine things. The stories aren't hard to follow either!It's an awesome book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2005

    oh my god!! so awsome

    ............ i cant beleive it how anyone could do a piece of work so well you must read it. I recomend it for all ages. (But some parts may not be good for children under 7 for example the battles).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2005

    Awaome!! My Favorite Book in the Series!

    It was a great book. It follows up Redwall and has many of the same characters like Matthias, Constance Badger, and my favorite, Basil Stag Hair!!!!! Kool battle at the end.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2005

    This is a great book!

    In the book there is a feast when these clowns come, but it is Slagar¿s villains. While everyone is watching the clowns Slagar is poisoning the drinks. When everyone is poisoned he took all the kids. The main characters are Orlando the Ax, Mattais the Warrior, Mattimeo, and Slagar the Cruel. The problem is that all the kids in Redwall have been take as slaves. I would say the genre is fantasy because of the warrior animals. The setting is in Mossflower¿s woods. In one part of the book Mattais challenges the strongest of the bad guys. As he is fighting he gets tied in the bad guys net and is thrown off the edge. I like this book because off the excitement and fantasy. It has a new world. I¿m recommending this book because when I began reading it I couldn¿t put it down. I would rate this book a 9. A kid who likes fantasy book will surly like this one. Connor M., grade 5 Bales Intermediate, Friendswood, Texas

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2005

    this is the beast

    ok i am in h school this book i have read it thought about 6 times its thst goiod its hard to put down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2005

    bound to be great

    Mattimeo is a pointless tale to an already mediocre series. Just kidding! Mattimeo is actually an amazing adventure to an already great series. There is much adventure in it, which is why it is my favorite book in the series (so far). There is plenty of suspense and action to hold your attentiion and the final battle is so exciting and cool! READ IT OR ELSE!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2004

    MATTHIAS AGAINST SLAGAR. GET OUT THE POPCORN AND GET READY FOR ACTION!

    MATTIMEO GOES BACK TO THE CHARACTERS IN THE FIRST BOOK REDWALL AND BRINGS ANOTHER AWSOME ADVENTURE! READ IT!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2004

    I'm Breath-taken!

    Little Mattimeo the brat is what Mathias's son is known by at Redwall Abbey. Everything changes after Slaggar the Cruel comes and kiddnaps Redwalls precious young ones. Mattimeo must change his rebelous attitude if he is to get himself and his friends free from Slaggars fierocous slave band. Mathias must travel, track, and fight fast if he wants to rescue Redwalls young back. This book was an excelent novel and I recomend it to ages eight and up. This funny heartwarming story is enough to cheer anybody.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2004

    Matthias' son Mattimeo

    This book starts out with a Redwall Jubilee Feast and introduces Matti, a little kid mouse without a care; but who looks forward to weilding his father's sword. He's a mischevious type,(like all little kids are), but when he and some of his friends are captured by the twisted fox, Slagar, he has to learn bravery. The parents of the captured children(including Matthias), set out to find them and meet up with Orlando the Badger. Well, that's it. READ IT!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2004

    Eric, Book worm

    BEST REDWALL BOOK EVER!!!! I FINISHED IT IN 5 DAYS! I COULDN'T PUT IT DOWN!!! I AM ON SALAMADTRON RIGHT NOW!! NICE BOOK

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