Max Cleans Up [NOOK Book]

Overview

Max's room is a mess! There's a Popsicle melting in the closet, a tube of opened Miracle Bubbles on the floor, and the ant farm ants have escaped under the bed! It's definitely time to clean up. Max's sister, Ruby, is quick to take charge, and of course Max wants to help. But Max has his own ideas about picking up his room, so things don't turn out exactly as Ruby planned. ...
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Overview

Max's room is a mess! There's a Popsicle melting in the closet, a tube of opened Miracle Bubbles on the floor, and the ant farm ants have escaped under the bed! It's definitely time to clean up. Max's sister, Ruby, is quick to take charge, and of course Max wants to help. But Max has his own ideas about picking up his room, so things don't turn out exactly as Ruby planned. Children will cheer as Max innocently and humorously outsmarts his older sister once again.


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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-The rabbit siblings are back, and they're just as lovable as ever. This time, Ruby is attempting to get Max to clean up his room. Instead of throwing away such things as dirt from his dump truck, ants from his ant farm, an old Easter egg, a melted Popsicle, and other gooey things, he deposits all of them in his front pocket. This, of course, leads to a messy discovery on the last page. The illustrations have more texture than those in the earlier stories; these mixed-media pictures include rubber ants, bird gravel, silver foil, and more, resulting in a new, different, and visually appealing look.-Christina F. Renaud, Attleboro Public Library, MA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Corduroy's pocket has nothing on Max's. While sainted big sister Ruby scurries busily about restoring order to his gloriously cluttered room, Max surreptitiously rescues treasures from the trash, including the dirt from his Power City Rocker Crusher dump truck, an open tube of "Miracle Bubbles," ants escaped from the ant farm, an ancient Easter egg, and a half-melted Popsicle. Wells hasn't changed her stumpy sibs, aside from making them even bigger and more portly, but here she places them amidst low relief collages constructed from, among other media, paper, feathers, gravel, rubber ants, and large, brightly colored blobs of—something. The effect isn't entirely successful; though everything bursts from Max's bulging pocket in a grand climactic spill, it hasn't mixed or smeared together at all, making a mess that is, paradoxically, very clean-looking. Still, it's a good try, as droll as ever, and sure to draw plenty of giggles from the burgeoning Max and Ruby fan club. (Picture book. 3-5)Weninger, Brigitte HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DAVY! Illus. by Eve Tharlet Rosemary Lanning North-South (32 pp.) Oct. 2000
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101496879
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 10/2/2000
  • Series: Max and Ruby Series
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 592,354
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • File size: 8 MB

Meet the Author

Born in New York City, Rosemary Wells grew up in a house "filled with books, dogs, and nineteenth-century music." Her childhood years were spent between her parents' home near Red Bank, New Jersey, and her grandmother's rambling stucco house on the Jersey Shore. Most of her sentimental memories, both good and bad, stem from that place and time. Her mother was a dancer in the Russian Ballet, and her father a playwright and actor. Mrs. Wells says, "Both my parents flooded me with books and stories. My grandmother took me on special trips to the theater and museums in New York.



When I was two years old I began to draw and they saw right away the career that lay ahead of me and encouraged me every day of my life. As far back as I can remember, I did nothing but draw."



A self-proclaimed "poor student," Wells attended the Museum School in Boston after finishing high school. It was, she recalls, "a bastion of abstract expressionism an art form that brought to my mind things I don't like to eat, fabrics that itch against the skin, divorce, paper cuts, and metallic noises."



Without her degree, she left school at 19, married, and began a fledgling career as a book designer with a Boston textbook publisher. When her husband, Tom, applied to the Columbia School of Architecture two years later, the couple moved to New York, where she began her career in children's books working as a designer at Macmillan. It was there that she published her first book, an illustrated edition of Gilbert & Sullivan's I Have a Song to Sing-O.



Rosemary Wells's career as an author and illustrator spans more than 30 years and 60 books. She has won numerous awards, and has given readers such unforgettable characters as Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora, and Yoko. She has also given Mother Goose new life in two enormous, definitive editions, published by Candlewick. Wells wrote and illustrated Unfortunately Harriet, her first book with Dial, in 1972. One year later she wrote the popular Noisy Nora. "The children and our home life have inspired, in part, many of my books. Our West Highland white terrier, Angus, had the shape and expressions to become Benjamin and Tulip, Timothy, and all the other animals I have made up for my stories." Her daughters Victoria and Beezoo were constant inspirations, especially for the now famous "Max" board book series. "Simple incidents from childhood are universal," Wells says. "The dynamics between older and younger siblings are common to all families."



But not all of Wells' ideas come from within the family circle. Many times when speaking, Mrs. Wells is asked where her ideas come from. She usually answers, "It's a writer's job to have ideas." Sometimes an idea comes from something she reads or hears about, as in the case of her recent book, Mary on Horseback, a story based on the life of Mary Breckenridge, who founded the Frontier Nursing Service. Timothy Goes to School was based on an incident in which her daughter was teased for wearing the wrong clothes to a Christmas concert. Her dogs, west highland terriers, Lucy and Snowy, work their way into her drawings in expression and body position. She admits, "I put into my books all of the things I remember. I am an accomplished eavesdropper in restaurants, trains, and gatherings of any kind. These remembrances are jumbled up and changed because fiction is always more palatable than truth. Memories become more true as they are honed and whittled into characters and stories."



Mrs. Wells says, "Most of my books use animals rather than children as characters. People always ask why. There are many reasons. First, I draw animals more easily and amusingly than I do children. Animals are broader in range--age, time, and place--than children are. They also can do things in pictures that children cannot. They can be slapstick and still real, rough and still funny, maudlin and still touching.



In Benjamin and Tulip, Tulip falls out of a tree and mashes Benjamin in the mud. If these pictures were of children, they would be too close to violent reality for comfort, and all the humor would be lost."



Her writing career has been a "pure delight," she says. "I regret only that I cannot live other lives parallel to my own. Writing is a lonely profession and I am a gregarious sort of person. I would like someday to work for the FBI. A part of me was never satisfied with years of tennis. I still yearned to play basketball."


Born in New York City, Rosemary Wells grew up in a house "filled with books, dogs, and nineteenth-century music." Her childhood years were spent between her parents' home near Red Bank, New Jersey, and her grandmother's rambling stucco house on the Jersey Shore. Most of her sentimental memories, both good and bad, stem from that place and time. Her mother was a dancer in the Russian Ballet, and her father a playwright and actor. Mrs. Wells says, "Both my parents flooded me with books and stories. My grandmother took me on special trips to the theater and museums in New York.



When I was two years old I began to draw and they saw right away the career that lay ahead of me and encouraged me every day of my life. As far back as I can remember, I did nothing but draw."



A self-proclaimed "poor student," Wells attended the Museum School in Boston after finishing high school. It was, she recalls, "a bastion of abstract expressionism an art form that brought to my mind things I don't like to eat, fabrics that itch against the skin, divorce, paper cuts, and metallic noises."



Without her degree, she left school at 19, married, and began a fledgling career as a book designer with a Boston textbook publisher. When her husband, Tom, applied to the Columbia School of Architecture two years later, the couple moved to New York, where she began her career in children's books working as a designer at Macmillan. It was there that she published her first book, an illustrated edition of Gilbert & Sullivan's I Have a Song to Sing-O.



Rosemary Wells's career as an author and illustrator spans more than 30 years and 60 books. She has won numerous awards, and has given readers such unforgettable characters as Max and Ruby, Noisy Nora, and Yoko. She has also given Mother Goose new life in two enormous, definitive editions, published by Candlewick. Wells wrote and illustrated Unfortunately Harriet, her first book with Dial, in 1972. One year later she wrote the popular Noisy Nora. "The children and our home life have inspired, in part, many of my books. Our West Highland white terrier, Angus, had the shape and expressions to become Benjamin and Tulip, Timothy, and all the other animals I have made up for my stories." Her daughters Victoria and Beezoo were constant inspirations, especially for the now famous "Max" board book series. "Simple incidents from childhood are universal," Wells says. "The dynamics between older and younger siblings are common to all families."



But not all of Wells' ideas come from within the family circle. Many times when speaking, Mrs. Wells is asked where her ideas come from. She usually answers, "It's a writer's job to have ideas." Sometimes an idea comes from something she reads or hears about, as in the case of her recent book, Mary on Horseback, a story based on the life of Mary Breckenridge, who founded the Frontier Nursing Service. Timothy Goes to School was based on an incident in which her daughter was teased for wearing the wrong clothes to a Christmas concert. Her dogs, west highland terriers, Lucy and Snowy, work their way into her drawings in expression and body position. She admits, "I put into my books all of the things I remember. I am an accomplished eavesdropper in restaurants, trains, and gatherings of any kind. These remembrances are jumbled up and changed because fiction is always more palatable than truth. Memories become more true as they are honed and whittled into characters and stories."



Mrs. Wells says, "Most of my books use animals rather than children as characters. People always ask why. There are many reasons. First, I draw animals more easily and amusingly than I do children. Animals are broader in range--age, time, and place--than children are. They also can do things in pictures that children cannot. They can be slapstick and still real, rough and still funny, maudlin and still touching.



In Benjamin and Tulip, Tulip falls out of a tree and mashes Benjamin in the mud. If these pictures were of children, they would be too close to violent reality for comfort, and all the humor would be lost."



Her writing career has been a "pure delight," she says. "I regret only that I cannot live other lives parallel to my own. Writing is a lonely profession and I am a gregarious sort of person. I would like someday to work for the FBI. A part of me was never satisfied with years of tennis. I still yearned to play basketball."



































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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Max is at it Again!

    Max's room is a mess, and it's time to clean up. Max's idea of clean-up is a little different than big sister, Ruby's. Ruby puts everything where it belongs, but Max? Let's just say that Max has a really big pocket!

    Max Cleans Up is a hilarious story that shows kids how NOT to clean up. The adorable illustrations are sure to illicit some giggles, especially the last one in which everything in Max's pocket spills out.

    My five-year-old son loves this book. (Could it be because he is so much like Max?) I highly recommend this book for kids ages 3-7. It's a great way to encourage them to clean up (the proper way).

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 17, 2011

    Have on nook color

    This is very cute.Max what a mess and poor Ruby just keeps taking care of him! A bit steep on price but B&N doesnt seem to care when that is mentioned in a review. I might like thie better in the book verstion, but my 3yr old likes this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 6, 2011

    not a favorite in my home

    where are their parents. these books are truly a parents nightmare to read and feel like they go on forever.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Max is a hoot!

    Max is always teaching a lesson. He is a great character children and parents easily identify. Great for teaching about life's ups and downs.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2004

    SO CUTE

    I really enjoyesd Max Cleans Up. It was a very cute story and I read it to some of my nephews. Thanks to the author for a great and cute book!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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