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Max's Dragon
     

Max's Dragon

5.0 1
by Kate Banks
 

Max is looking for words that rhyme. His dragon is in his wagon – or was, for now its tail has left a trail, which Max follows. He finds an umbrella on the ground— "Found, ground," he says, while his older brothers mock him for believing in dragons and sitting under an umbrella when it isn't even raining. But Max believes in possibilities—and when

Overview

Max is looking for words that rhyme. His dragon is in his wagon – or was, for now its tail has left a trail, which Max follows. He finds an umbrella on the ground— "Found, ground," he says, while his older brothers mock him for believing in dragons and sitting under an umbrella when it isn't even raining. But Max believes in possibilities—and when he can show his brothers not only a dragon in the stormy clouds but also a dinosaur, they begin to come round. When Max demonstrates the power of his rhyming words to tame the dinosaur and the dragon and make the rain come, he wins them over completely.

With amusing wordplay and beguiling illustrations, Kate Banks and Boris Kulikov celebrate language and imagination in a collaboration that is bound to be oodles of fun for everyone. This title has Common Core connections.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Max's Dragon may well intrigue a child just beginning to glimpse the possibility that words, like toys, if put together just so, can ignite a thrilling magic of their own.” —The New York Times Book Review

“Another winner from the pair that introduced Max in Max's Words. Amusing wordplay and impish illustrations play off each other in perfect syncopation.” —Starred, Kirkus Reviews

“Suffused with a golden light... a celebration of child imagination wherein words do indeed have power.” —School Library Journal

“The unusual perspectives in the bright, textured artwork greatly enhance the story's drama and, in the active spreads of endearing dragons and goofy dinosaurs, the blurring of the real and imagined worlds.” —Booklist

“The playful couplets will keep early readers and listeners engaged and anticipating each new pair.” —The Horn Book

“This is a great book, combining two things children will love to do, rhyme and imagine.” —Times Record News

“A wonderful introduction to poetry for young children.” —Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast

Children's Literature - Carly Reagan
It is rhyme time with Max and his Dragon, so put on your thinking caps and help Max keep his dragon safe and happy by digging up some clever rhymes. Max and his two friends, Karl and Ben, let their linguistic imaginations run wild as they first imagine a dragon, along with a dinosaur, fighting in the sky, appeased only by a good rhyme. A rather bizarre, contrived story line is the basis for an obvious language lesson in the use of rhyme, feeling more like an educational cartoon than a quality storybook. The illustrations are well done and attractive enough but provide no benefits to the book as a whole. For the early elementary school teacher discussing language and writing techniques, this could easily be used as a resource for exemplifying rhyming words, if interesting storylines are not a factor. Just do not forget to include some other great examples such as the writings of Dr. Seuss and other great children's poets, including Shel Silverstein and Jack Prelutsky, who use rhyming words which also happen to be part of a clever piece of writing. Reviewer: Carly Reagan
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1- Max is looking for rhyming words ("Look what I found on the ground") while his brothers play a game of croquet. These rhymes take on a life of their own as he imagines a dragon in the clouds. The beast is soon hotly pursued by a thunderous dinosaur cloud that brings a storm of words and rain. The boys work together to banish the beast and, coincidentally, the storm ("The dinosaur fell into the well....Where he had to stay for the rest of the day"). Then they all play croquet and rhyme together. The spreads are suffused with a golden light, and Kulikov uses shadows and patterns to great effect. However, the plot and logic are not as strong as in Max's Words (Farrar, 2006), and the wordplay is less pronounced both in text and art. The book works best as a celebration of childhood imagination wherein words do indeed have power.-Marge Loch-Wouters, Menasha Public Library, WI

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Another winner from the pair that introduced Max in Max's Words (2006). This time, he's on a quest for rhyming words. His imaginary dragon leads him in and out of a croquet game and a pouring thunderstorm. When the obstreperous dragon gets out of hand, how does Max curtail him? He makes a new rhyme, of course: "My dragon's fury makes me worry." Amusing wordplay and impish illustrations play off each other in perfect syncopation. With whimsical textures and perspectives, the artwork makes the story pop and expands the text with almost palpable visuals, such as his knit sweaters or the cover title, which is filled with orange scales and claws on the bottom of the letters "M" and "X." Offering wonderful opportunities for use by Art and Language Arts teachers, the combination of the boy's point of view, words that rhyme and an imaginary friend are hard to beat. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780374399214
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
03/18/2008
Series:
Max's Words Series , #2
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
643,226
Product dimensions:
10.57(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Kate Banks and Boris Kulikov's Max's Words was a Children's Book Sense Pick and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year. They also collaborated on The Eraserheads. Ms. Banks has written many other books for young readers, including And If the Moon Could Talk, winner of the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, and The Night Worker, winner of the Charlotte Zolotow Award. She lives in the South of France. Mr. Kulikov has illustrated a number of books for children and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Max's Dragon 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Musings_of_Madjy More than 1 year ago
This is the first of three "Max" books by Kate Banks and Boris Kulikov that I picked up when my son was an infant. I think it's fun to find books with my son's name in it. Seeing as how the dedications in the books are often "To my Max," "No, to MY Max," I'm guessing that both Banks and Kulikov feel the same. ;) The art style of Kulikov is uniquely detailed and adds a lot of charm to his books. The children are all well-drawn and you can see their personalities in their expressions and outfit choices. The wonderful imagination that Max has is shown beautifully as you get a bit of reality blended with a vivid imagination. The character of Max feels very much like a "little brother," but one who is confident in what he does despite his older brothers, Benjamin and Karl, making fun of him. I really love how both brothers are a dismissive of Max until they just can't help but be pulled into his fun world of adventure. The rhyming is great and uses mostly multisyllabic words, so they all feel fresh. The rhyming game the boys all play would also be a fun one to play in real life, especially for those ages 6-10 or so. My son (3.5) is still a bit young for that, but he does still enjoy all the rhymes and pictures!