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Maya / Edition 8
     

Maya / Edition 8

1.5 2
by Michael D. Coe
 

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ISBN-10: 0500289026

ISBN-13: 2900500289029

Pub. Date: 01/31/2011

Publisher: Thames & Hudson

The Maya has long been established as the best, most readable introduction to the New World's greatest ancient civilization. In these pages Professor Coe distills a lifetime's scholarship for the general reader and student.

Since the publication of the previous edition, new sites have been uncovered and further excavations in old sites have proceeded at an

Overview

The Maya has long been established as the best, most readable introduction to the New World's greatest ancient civilization. In these pages Professor Coe distills a lifetime's scholarship for the general reader and student.

Since the publication of the previous edition, new sites have been uncovered and further excavations in old sites have proceeded at an unprecedented pace. Among the many new discoveries is the chance find of extraordinary murals dating to c. AD 100 at San Bartolo in the Peten. new epigraphic, archaeological, and osteological research has thrown light on the identity of the founders of such great sites as Tikal and Copan, and their close affiliation with Teotihuacan in central Mexico. The previously little-known center of Ek' Bahlam in northeastern Yucatan has turned out to be a regional kingdom of major importance, with extraordinary stucco reliefs and a plethora of painted inscriptions.

It has now become apparent that the birth of Maya civilization lies not in the Classic but during the Preclassic period, above all in the Mirador Basin of northern Guatemala, where the builders of glgantic ancient cities (interconnected by causeways) erected the world's largest pyramid as early as 200 BC. All of these finds suggest that we must rethink what we mean by "Classic."

The seventh edition also presents new evidence for the use of wetlands by the Classic Maya, and fresh perspectives on the catastrophic demise of Classic civilization by the close of the ninth century.

About the Author:
Michael D. Coe is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Yale University

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900500289029
Publisher:
Thames & Hudson
Publication date:
01/31/2011
Series:
Ancient Peoples and Places Series
Edition description:
Eighth Edition
Pages:
280

Table of Contents


Preface     7
Chronological Table     10
Introduction     11
The setting     14
Natural resources     22
Areas     23
Periods     24
Peoples and languages     26
Climate change and its cultural impact     31
The Earliest Maya     41
Early hunters     41
Archaic collectors and cultivators     44
Early Preclassic villages     47
The Middle Preclassic expansion     50
Preclassic Kaminaljuyu     52
The Maya lowlands     55
The Rise of Maya Civilization     58
The birth of the calendar     60
The Hero Twins and the Creation of the World (box)     65
Izapa and the Pacific Coast     67
Kaminaljuyu and the Maya highlands     70
The Peten and the Maya lowlands     76
The Mirador Basin     81
San Bartolo     82
From Preclassic to Classic in the Maya lowlands     84
Classic Splendor: the Early Period     86
Teotihuacan: military giant     88
The Esperanza culture     90
Tzak'ol culture in the Central Area     95
Copan in the Early Classic     105
The Northern Area     108
Classic Splendor: the Late Period     110
Classic sites in the Central Area     112
Copan and Quirigua     115
Tikal     122
Calakmul     125
Yaxchilan, Piedras Negras, and Bonampak     125
The Petexbatun     129
Palenque     130
Comalcalco and Tonina     139
Classic sites in the Northern Area: Rio Bec, Chenes, and Coba     140
Art of the Late Classic     142
The Terminal Classic     161
The Great Collapse     161
Seibal and the Putun Maya     164
Puuk sites in the Northern Area     165
The Terminal Classic at Chichen Itza     170
Ek' Bahlam     172
The Cotzumalhuapa problem     174
The end of an era     176
The Post-Classic     177
The Toltec invasion and Chichen Itza     179
The Itza and the city of Mayapan     193
The independent states of Yucatan     196
The Central Area in the Post-Classic     199
Maya-Mexican dynasties in the Southern Area     199
The Spanish Conquest      202
Maya Life on the Eve of the Conquest     204
The farm and the chase     204
Industry and commerce     206
The life cycle     207
Society and politics     208
Maya Thought and Culture     210
The universe and the gods     213
The earth and the gods     215
The Classic Maya Underworld     218
Rites and ritual practitioners     221
Numbers and the calendar     223
The sun and the moon     225
The celestial wanderers and the stars     227
The nature of Maya writing     229
History graven in stone     234
Maya superstates     238
History and the supernatural     239
Name-tagging     240
Spiritual alter-egos     241
The Enduring Maya     242
The new Spanish order     243
The highland Maya, yesterday and today     245
The Tzotzil Maya of Zinacantan     247
The Yucatec Maya     249
The War of the Castes     250
The Maya of Chan K'om     250
The Lakandon     252
Uprising in Chiapas     252
The great terror      253
The Maya future     254
Visiting the Maya Area     256
Dynastic Rulers of Classic Maya Cities     260
Further Reading     262
Sources of Illustrations     267
Index     268

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The Maya 1.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Mmarissa More than 1 year ago
I am high school sophomore that was assigned to do a research project on the Ancient Mayans. Reading Micheal D. Coe book The Maya  Eighth Edition is a is very detailed book about the start of the Mayas and their civilization.  However, this book does not as much focus on  how the Maya civilization came to be and the struggles the faced after the conquetadiors came in, but more about all the archeologist that have dedicated their time in to find out more about the Maya people and where they were located. Reading this very lengthy book I learned  a lot about artifacts and buildings that have been built by the Maya people and found by archeologist. However, I did enjoy the final three  chapters of this book because it finally is about the Maya thoughts, culture, and the conquest of the Spanish explores before coming into the Maya civilization.  I would not  recommend this book to a high school student that is looking for a book to answer questions about the Maya people and lifestyle for a research report. I would recommend this book to a college student or adult that is looking to learn more about or  who plans in visiting Maya ruins, buildings and seeing artifacts.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago