Mayan Cuisine: Recipes from the Yucatan Region
  • Mayan Cuisine: Recipes from the Yucatan Region
  • Mayan Cuisine: Recipes from the Yucatan Region

Mayan Cuisine: Recipes from the Yucatan Region

4.6 3
by Daniel Hoyer
     
 

In his signature style, Daniel Hoyer brings us the authentic recipes of the Mayan Cusine: Receipes from the Yucatan Region, along with his personal experiences that make the historical and cultural background of this people accessible and enjoyable. Having been influenced for centuries by the Spanish, other European countries, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and

See more details below

Overview

In his signature style, Daniel Hoyer brings us the authentic recipes of the Mayan Cusine: Receipes from the Yucatan Region, along with his personal experiences that make the historical and cultural background of this people accessible and enjoyable. Having been influenced for centuries by the Spanish, other European countries, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and even the Caribbean, Mayan food is remarkably unique and distinct. Mayan Cooking offers recipes for Sweet Corn and Cilantro Cream Soups, Yucatan BBQ Shrimp, Smoked Pork Loin, Jicama-Orange Salad, and Chicken in Red Chile and Pumpkinseed Sauce, as well as an abundance of recipes for salsas, sauces, spice mixes, and marinades.

Recipes Include:

Bean-Filled Masa Fritters

Baked Chayote Squash Pudding

Mexican Lime Soup

Pit-Roasted Pork with Yucatan Spices

Yucatan BBQ Shrimp

Pumpkinseed Brittle

Author Bio: Daniel Hoyer is an experienced chef, restaurateur, and teacher. Daniel is the author of Culinary Mexico: Authentic Recipes and Traditions and Fiesta on the Grill. He resides in the Rio Grande Valley near Pilar, New Mexico, with his family.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Wisconsin Bookwatch: June 2008
A food rich in flavor to begin with, but taking on the best traits of other traditions of cuisine -- Spanish, French, Asian, Caribbean, and so many more -- it's one way to describe the food of the Maya. "Mayan Cuisine: Recipes From the Yucatan Region" is a look at the delectable food of the Mayan people, with step-by-step guides and full color photos to help one emulate the authentic Mayan flavor in their own kitchen. With dishes like Meat and Rice-Stuffed Leaves, Tamale Pie, Yucatan Breakfast Sausages, and more, "Mayan Cuisine: Recipes From the Yucatan Region" is a must for any ethnic cookbook shelf or for anyone looking for a different taste to sink their teeth into.

— James A. Cox

Wisconsin Bookwatch: June 2008
A food rich in flavor to begin with, but taking on the best traits of other traditions of cuisine -- Spanish, French, Asian, Caribbean, and so many more -- it's one way to describe the food of the Maya. "Mayan Cuisine: Recipes From the Yucatan Region" is a look at the delectable food of the Mayan people, with step-by-step guides and full color photos to help one emulate the authentic Mayan flavor in their own kitchen. With dishes like Meat and Rice-Stuffed Leaves, Tamale Pie, Yucatan Breakfast Sausages, and more, "Mayan Cuisine: Recipes From the Yucatan Region" is a must for any ethnic cookbook shelf or for anyone looking for a different taste to sink their teeth into.

— James A. Cox

Wisconsin Bookwatch: June 2008 - James A. Cox
A food rich in flavor to begin with, but taking on the best traits of other traditions of cuisine -- Spanish, French, Asian, Caribbean, and so many more -- it's one way to describe the food of the Maya. "Mayan Cuisine: Recipes From the Yucatan Region" is a look at the delectable food of the Mayan people, with step-by-step guides and full color photos to help one emulate the authentic Mayan flavor in their own kitchen. With dishes like Meat and Rice-Stuffed Leaves, Tamale Pie, Yucatan Breakfast Sausages, and more, "Mayan Cuisine: Recipes From the Yucatan Region" is a must for any ethnic cookbook shelf or for anyone looking for a different taste to sink their teeth into.
Publishers Weekly
In his latest, chef Hoyer (Culinary Mexico) offers a vibrant, thorough guide to Mayan cooking. Once cooks master the basic recado, a thick seasoning paste that serves as a key flavor component, they're ready to tackle dishes like Salpicón de Venado (a roast venison salad), polenta studded with wild mushrooms, classic Mexican Lime Soup and meaty dishes like Pavo en Chilimole (Turkey in Black Seasoning Paste) and the classic pit-roasted pork, Cochinita Pibil. Those looking for shortcuts will likely be frustrated, as Hoyer is a traditionalist who makes tortillas and masa from scratch for his tamales, including the elaborate Tamales de la Bola Colados, a traditional wedding dish in which shredded chicken is enveloped in a smooth, custard-like masa and steamed. That said, many less-complicated dishes are just as rewarding, including pumpkinseed dip and brittle, luscious Chayote Squash Pudding, Cuban roast pork and crunchy Xol-Chon Kek, a jicama and orange salad. Hoyer is encouraging and enthusiastic, offering salient tips for key techniques like working with tamale wrappers and charring tomatoes, as well as sources for hard-to-locate ingredients. Those interested in expanding their cultural and culinary horizons will find this collection both educational and all-inclusive.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423601319
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
03/10/2008
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
491,788
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.06(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

Salsa Verde Green Tomatillo Sauce

Water to cook the tomatillos

1 teaspoon salt

2/3 pound tomatillos, husked and rinsed

2 to 3 fresh jalapeño or serrano chiles OR 2 hot green New Mexican chiles OR 1 habanero chile, stemmed and seeded

1 medium white onion, roughly chopped

3 cloves garlic, toasted and peeled

1/8 cup chopped cilantro leaves

MORE MEXICAN THAN MAYA, this salsa is still very important throughout the Maya lands. It is simple and straightforward and may be used with enchiladas, chilaquiles, tacos, tamales or simply as a table salsa or dip. The amount of chile heat is controlled by the varieties and quantities of chiles used. This sauce tends to thicken with time; add water to restore its original consistency.

Makes about 2 1/2 cups

1. Place enough water to cover the tomatillos in a pot or saucepan and bring to a boil.

2. Add the salt and the tomatillos and cook for 10 minutes, then drain.

3. Place everything in a blender and puree until smooth.

NOTE: If the salsa is a little too tart, mix in about 1/2 teaspoon of sugar.

Totopos Fresh Tortilla Chips

20 to 24 corn tortillas (homemade, cooked-on-the-comal tortillas are best but you may use the storebought varieties too)

1 to 2 quarts vegetable oil for frying

Juice of 1 lime (optional)

Salt, to taste

IN THE UNITED STATES, we are accustomed to light and crispy corn chips from a bag or the restaurant fryer; however, in Mexico, the chips are chewier and more substantial, having been made from fresh tortillas and undercooked slightly. I have learned to prefer this method for my chips.Make sure that your oil is up to temperature before frying the chips or they will be greasy as well as chewy. Use these as you would any corn chip; for dips, nachos, garnishes or with salsa.

Makes about 1 pound of chips

1. Cut the tortillas into 6 wedges each and spread the chips out for an hour or two to dry (turn them over several times while drying to ensure evenness).

2. Heat the oil to 350 degrees F and fry the chips a few at a time until they are just browning and crisping around the edges. Drain well and continue for all of the chips.

3. While the chips are still hot, sprinkle with the lime juice (if using) and liberally salt.

NOTE: You may store the chips in a sealed plastic bag after they have completely cooled.

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >