Maybe I Will

( 2 )

Overview

It's not about sex. It's about how one secret act of violence changes everything-how best friends can desert you when you need them most, how nobody understands. It's about the drinking and stealing and lying and wondering who you can trust. It's about parents and teachers, police officers and counselors-all the people who are supposed to help you, but who may not even believe you. It's about how suddenly all of your hopes and dreams can vanish, and you can find yourself all alone, with nothing and no one. Your ...
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Overview

It's not about sex. It's about how one secret act of violence changes everything-how best friends can desert you when you need them most, how nobody understands. It's about the drinking and stealing and lying and wondering who you can trust. It's about parents and teachers, police officers and counselors-all the people who are supposed to help you, but who may not even believe you. It's about how suddenly all of your hopes and dreams can vanish, and you can find yourself all alone, with nothing and no one. Your only choice is to end it all or to start overand all you can think is Maybe I Will. ___________________________ Author Laurie Gray presents a compelling picture of the realities of sexual assault in Maybe I Will, drawing on her years of experience as a Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, dealing with crimes against children. The twist in the story is that we never know for sure if the victim is a boy or a girl, and we realize that it doesn't matter, because it's not about sex.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sandy has two close friends, Callie and Troy; immediate plans to audition for the lead in the high school musical, Peter Pan; and dreams that include Juilliard, Hollywood, and Broadway. But after Sandy is sexually assaulted by Callie’s boyfriend, Sandy’s life unravels. Sandy starts to steal and abuse alcohol, lies to everyone about what happened, and becomes isolated. Sandy’s supportive and concerned parents try to help, but seeing a “psycho therapist” is the last thing Sandy wants. Sandy’s gender is never revealed to readers, a decision intended to make the teenager’s experience more universal, but which instead keeps the character at a distance, despite Sandy also being the narrator. A new friend, Shanika, introduces Sandy to tae kwon do, which helps, but true recovery is impossible until Sandy faces the incident head-on. Gray (Summer Sanctuary) draws from her professional experience with teens in this fast-moving and emotional story. While readers may empathize with Sandy’s pain and recognize the value in seeking counsel from family and professionals alike, wooden dialogue and the characters’ overall artificiality keep the book from realizing its full potential. Ages 13–18. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
When a young person changes, suddenly and dramatically, for no apparent reason, there may be a reason that is not immediately apparent. In MAYBE I WILL, Laurie Gray insightfully explores such a situation. You will want to read this story twice. -- Helen Frost, Printz Honor Award-winning author of KEESHA'S HOUSE and DIAMOND WILLOW

In MAYBE I WILL, author Laurie Gray deals with a difficult topic in a thoughtful, nuanced, and realistic way. A pinch of humor and dash of Shakespeare add flavor to what otherwise might be an overly heavy stew. MAYBE I WILLl belongs on teens' reading lists and bookshelves alongside classics of its type such as Laurie Halse Anderson's SPEAK and Cheryl Rainfield's SCARS.. -- Mike Mullin, award winning author of ASHFALL and ASHEN WINTER

Sandy is written so as to be readable as either male or female...the book's portrayal is largely successful and the note it hits at the end is hopeful without being unrealistic. A careful treatment of a difficult topic. -- Kirkus Reviews

MAYBE I WILL is a fantastic story that stirs reader emotions and shares a meaningful story. I would recommend it to teenagers who enjoy realistic fiction and books like SPEAK. -- LitPik

MAYBE I WILL sets the stage for serious discussion about sexual assualt and the complications that arise form coming clean. -- VOYA

MAYBE I WILL finds a new way to explore how sexual assault can affect anyone, not just a boy or a girl. The ending is sweet and somewhat unexpected. I liked how things didn't get all wrapped up. Life leaves a few loose strings, and Gray did get that right. -- The Young Folks

Gray's background as Deputy Prosecuting Attorney and her talent as a writer enabled [her] to craft characters whose emotions, motivations, and reactions seem realistic and utterly believable. I would definately recommend MAYBE I WILL for high school aged readers, but I think it's important that parents or tachers read it with the students. Kids will probably have questions about what they read and will benefit from discussing this topic with a trusted adult. -- Ross Brand, THE TRADES

[Our teacher] told us the big twist when she asked, Is Sandy a boy or a girl? We were both shocked. I think, if the gender question was kept from readers until after reading, this book would make a really thoughtful classroom/book discussion choice. -- Katie ~ Top Ten Recommendation YALSA Galley Reviews

OMG! This book blew my mind! -- Sarah ~ Top Ten Recommendation YALSA Galley Reviews

This book was great. I would recommend it to anyone looking for a different read. -- Victoria ~ Top Ten Recommendation YALSA Galley Reviews

VOYA - Matthew Weaver
It is debatable whether Gray's decision to never reveal the gender of narrator Sandy is a brave storytelling move or a failed attempt to be clever, but there ought to be plenty of discussion about the subject matter. Sandy is trying out for the role of Peter Pan in the high school musical when longtime best friend Cassie's new boyfriend, Aaron, sexually assaults her/him. Sandy is too embarrassed to tell an extremely supportive mother and father, and starts swiping alcohol. Sandy turns to new friend, Shanika, for support as Cassie and other lifelong buddy, Troy, slowly slip away. When the truth comes out, who will still be in Sandy's corner? Maybe I Will sets the stage for serious discussion about sexual assault and the complications that arise from coming clean, using Gray's experience as a deputy prosecuting attorney dealing with crimes against children. The realities of the legal system can be frustrating for those seeking satisfying resolution, and potentially frightening, if the reader's situation bears any sort of similarity to Sandy's, particularly one rough confrontation with a detective. Gray explains her neutral narrator decision in a note, hoping for a society that "embraces and values male and female experiences equally." It is not likely to give anyone all the answers, but it is a good first step to get the conversation started. Reviewer: Matthew Weaver
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—Sandy plans to audition for the school's production of Peter Pan. Never identified as male or female, the aspiring actor loves performing and intends to go to Juilliard for a degree in drama. Sandy has two close friends: Cassie and Troy. When Cassie's boyfriend, Aaron, sexually assaults Sandy, the teen becomes depressed, turns to alcohol, begins to shoplift, and pulls away from Cassie and Troy. Sandy develops a new friendship with Shanika and is introduced to tae kwon do, which helps a little, but it is not until the teen's parents eventually learn of the troubles and become involved that recovery is possible. The author intentionally does not identify Sandy's gender to demonstrate that neither sex is immune to trauma, but this device hinders readers' ability to fully connect with the character. The narrative never truly resonates with readers because of their inability to empathize with Sandy.—Melissa Stock, Arapahoe Library District, Englewood, CO
Kirkus Reviews
Before the sexual assault, Sandy was an upbeat, Shakespeare-loving teen with two close friends and ambitions of pursuing theater at Juilliard. After, nothing makes sense. Sandy's friend Cassie, whose boyfriend Aaron perpetrated the assault, believes Aaron's story over Sandy's, and Sandy's other friend, Troy, sides with Cassie. Sandy's attempts to cope with the depression and anxiety brought on by the incident range from positive (joining new friend Shanika's taekwondo class) to destructive (stealing vodka from a local store to support a very quickly developed psychological dependency). Reactions to Sandy's situation also run a believable gamut: Cassie and Troy's rejection, Shanika's disclosure of information about another assault on Aaron's part, a police officer's essential accusation that Sandy is lying, Sandy's parents' display of support and concern. Sandy is written so as to be readable as either male or female, and while this device is somewhat effective, it also robs the story of some valuable specificity. Might not Cassie react differently to hearing that her boyfriend has assaulted a female friend versus a male friend? Wouldn't a male Sandy question or consider his sexual orientation after the incident differently than a female one? Despite some gaps in Sandy's internal experience, however, the book's portrayal is largely successful, and the note it hits at the end is hopeful without being unrealistic. A careful treatment of a difficult topic. (Fiction. 14-18)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781935462705
  • Publisher: Luminis Books
  • Publication date: 3/15/2013
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 387,134
  • Age range: 12 - 18 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Laurie Gray has worked as a high school teacher, a deputy prosecuting attorney, and the founder of Socratic Parenting LLC (www.SocraticParenting.com). In addition to writing, speaking and consulting, Laurie currently works as a bilingual child forensic interviewer at her local Child Advocacy Center and as an adjunct professor of criminal sciences at Indiana Tech. She has served on the faculty of the National Symposium for Child Abuse in Huntsville, Alabama, annually since 2009.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2013

    Amazing

    I loved this book soooo much! It was great! I felt a very deep connection with the whole story and how so much can change in so little time. I recomend this book for girls ages 13- 16 Maybe I Will an unforgettable story that I'm surprised hasn't gotten more recognized. ): I was looking for a book I wouldn't be able to put down and thats what I got(:

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 23, 2013

    Life couldn't be better for Sandy. Cassie and Troy are the best

    Life couldn't be better for Sandy. Cassie and Troy are the best friends that one could ever hope for, and Sandy's parents are understanding and supportive. Nailing the role of Peter Pan at the school musical and the new iPhone makes life even better. And then tragedy strikes. 

    One night at Cassie's house, Sandy is sexually abused by Cassie's boyfriend, Aaron. In a matter of seconds, Sandy is traumatised and life takes a downward spiral. Sandy turns to drinking, and steals to support the habit. Depression and anger become close friends as Sandy starts to isolate from both Cassie, who believes Aaron's story, and Troy, who is anguished at having to choose between them. 

    There are relatively few books that make me cry, and this is one of them. It's very easy to identify with Sandy's thoughts and feelings, even if you've never been in the same situation. Gray's storytelling makes everything so vivid and so real that you are able to step into Sandy's situation and identify with him/her.

    It's not clear if Sandy is a guy or a girl. In certain passages, I'd imagine Sandy, in all her enthusiasm and excitement, as a girl. In others, Sandy's actions lead me to believe he's a guy. This was done intentionally by Laurie Gray, and it's quite effective in her purpose - to emphasise the fact that sexual abuse happens to everyone, whether male or female. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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