Mayflower 1620: A New Look at a Pilgrim Voyage

Mayflower 1620: A New Look at a Pilgrim Voyage

by Peter Arenstam
     
 
Plimoth Plantation and the National Geographic Society come together to tell the true story behind the legendary voyage of the Mayflower. A meticulously researched work, Mayflower 1620 offers children a compelling, fresh account of this much-told story.

Vibrant photography of a rare reenactment using the Mayflower II leads readers imaginatively

Overview

Plimoth Plantation and the National Geographic Society come together to tell the true story behind the legendary voyage of the Mayflower. A meticulously researched work, Mayflower 1620 offers children a compelling, fresh account of this much-told story.

Vibrant photography of a rare reenactment using the Mayflower II leads readers imaginatively into the narrative. The vivid and informative text explores the story behind the exhibits at the living-history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Primary sources record what the voyagers wore, what they ate, and telling details of their journey. First-person accounts reveal the hopes and dreams they carried. Readers share in the long hours at sea, and in the dangers faced after landfall. Extensive end notes, a map, a detailed chronology, and a bibliography round out the full story of the Mayflower.

Readers experience a new look at this seminal historical event through the eyes of those who now regularly inhabit the world of the pilgrims—the actors who interpret the Pilgrim Voyage. This eye-opening book teaches children the value of closely reexamining everything we think we know.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Learn the difference between myth and reality in this well-documented book about the Mayflower journey....Clear, crisp color photos bring the adventure to life." —WonderKorner
Children's Literature
The full-color photographs of a replica of the original Mayflower illustrating this book are striking. The photos were taken in the summer of 2001 when the Mayflower II sailed from Plymouth to Boston to recreate scenes from 1620. The glossy pictures may belie the difficulties of the journey the early settlers made about 400 years earlier, but they do add a great deal to the book itself. The authors attempt to do away with myth and strip away false illusions that Americans may have about the original trip and the people who dared to make such an uncomfortable and daring journey. The authors emphasize the problems created for the Wampanoag peoples who populated the area before the arrival of the Europeans. William Bradford, who sailed aboard the Mayflower and wrote of the trip, is one of the sources quoted. A map, chronology, and a one-page story about the Mayflower II are included. 2003, National Geographic Society,
— Carolyn Mott Ford
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-This account of the voyage of the Mayflower is illustrated with photographs taken on a June, 2001, cruise of the Mayflower II. The illustrations are the real draw here-large, vivid, and expertly composed. The historical context of the original voyage is briefly sketched, as is the journey itself. Short chapters chronicle the provisioning of a ship from that time and describe navigation techniques. The readable text gives a good idea of the many unpleasant aspects of shipboard life in 1620, but doesn't present information that isn't available in many other books. The authors state that the settlers had "little or no respect" for Native Americans. Regarding the seed corn and other items that the exploratory parties took from the Native villages, the comment is that "few- considered this stealing." No mention is made of William Bradford's journal note that the goods would be paid for when the owners could be identified, and that this was done the following spring. Susan Whitehurst's lavishly illustrated The Mayflower (PowerKids, 2003) is briefer. Kate Waters's On the Mayflower: Voyage of the Ship's Apprentice and a Passenger Girl (Scholastic, 1996) is also illustrated with color photographs of interpreters aboard the Mayflower II, but fictionalizes events. Ann McGovern's -If You Sailed on the Mayflower in 1620 (Scholastic, 1991) looks drab by comparison, but contains more information. Children will enjoy looking at this book, and it is a reasonable choice to supplement classroom units.-Elaine Fort Weischedel, Millbury Public Library, MA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792261421
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
10/01/2003
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
8.75(w) x 11.25(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile:
1080L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Peter Arenstam and John Kemp both work on the Mayflower II at Plimoth Plantation. They are seasoned sailors and expert costumed interpreters of the early colonial period. Both men live in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Catherine O’Neill Grace has written several children’s books, including 1621: A New Look at Thanksgiving. She lives in Waltham, Massachusetts.

Plimoth Plantation is a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts that includes a recreated colonial village and Wampanoag Indian site as well as the Mayflower II, a wooden replica of the original Mayflower ship.

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