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McCulloch V. Maryland: Implied Powers of the Federal Government

Overview

After the first Bank of the United States lost its charter, a second Bank of the United States was created in 1816 to resolve the country's economic problems. Controversies over the bank, its notes, and the entire paper money system were part of what brought the Supreme Court into the debate raised by McCulloch v. Maryland. The larger issue was one of sovereignty: Who rules? Who had the most power: the state or federal government? Such questions highlighted the United States's system of checks and balances, one ...
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Overview

After the first Bank of the United States lost its charter, a second Bank of the United States was created in 1816 to resolve the country's economic problems. Controversies over the bank, its notes, and the entire paper money system were part of what brought the Supreme Court into the debate raised by McCulloch v. Maryland. The larger issue was one of sovereignty: Who rules? Who had the most power: the state or federal government? Such questions highlighted the United States's system of checks and balances, one of the foundations of democracy. The answers are found in McCulloch v. Maryland, which explains one of the most momentous decisions ever rendered by the U.S. Supreme Court.

About the Author:
Samuel Willard Crompton teaches history at Holyoke Community College and Westfield State College

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kathryn Erskine
Part of the "Great Supreme Court Decisions" series, this volume examines the battle for power between states and the federal government. It also reveals much about Supreme Court Justice John Marshall and others on the Supreme Court at the time, as well as interesting historical facts, such as Dolly Madison's insistence on rolling up George Washington's portrait and taking it with her before fleeing the White House. An interesting read, it also explains the historic decision that Congress had the authority to create a bank, despite the lack of such a specific grant of power in the Constitution, because not every need could have been anticipated by the framers of that document. Issues had to be interpreted, and John Marshall, writing the Court's opinion, gave this far-reaching opinion. Further, he explained that a state could not have power over the federal government and, therefore, could not impose tax on a federal bank. This is a valuable book for middle and upper school students, and there is a glossary, index, timeline, and list of resources to aid research.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780791092620
  • Publisher: Facts on File, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/28/2007
  • Series: Great Supreme Court Decisions Series
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 136
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.70 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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