McGraw-Hill Guide, Brief / Edition 1

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Overview

The Brief McGraw-Hill Guide is designed to help students learn to write more effectively not only in their college courses but also in their professional, civic, and personal lives. Combining a flexible reader, rhetoric, and research guide, The Brief Guide shows students how to set goals for their writing, to use effective composing strategies to reach those goals, and to assess their progress toward achieving them. Based on the idea that effective writers are strong communicators in any context, The Brief McGraw-Hill Guide emphasizes the skills established by the Writing Program Administrator's Outcomes Statement that form the foundation of assessment practices at writing programs throughout the country -- rhetorical knowledge, critical thinking, writing processes, and conventions. These skills form the basis of the instruction in each assignment chapter and throughout the text.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780077213992
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 1/10/2008
  • Edition description: Brief
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 1040
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents


Writing for College, Writing for Life

Part 1: Getting Started

1. Writing Goals and Objectives for College and for Life

WRITING IN THE FOUR AREAS OF YOUR LIFE

Writing as a College Student

Writing as a Professional

Writing as a Citizen

Writing as a Family Member or Friend

WRITING IN THE FOUR AREAS IN THIS COURSE

LEARNING GOALS IN THIS COURSE

Rhetorical Knowledge

Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing

Writing Processes

Knowledge of Conventions

BECOMING A SELF-REFLECTIVE WRITER

WRITING IN TODAY’S WORLD

Writing Responsibly

Writing Technologies

2. Reading Critically for College and for Life

USING PRE-READING STRATEGIES

READING ACTIVELY

Annotating Effectively

Reading Visuals

Reading Web Sites

USING POST-READING STRATEGIES

Starting Your Writer's / Research Journal

Writing Effective Summaries

Synthesizing Information in Readings

Using Your Reading in Your Own Writing

3. Writing to Discover and to Learn

USING INVENTION STRATEGIES TO DISCOVER IDEAS

Listing

Freewriting

Questioning

Answering the Questions Who? What? Why? When? Where? How?

Brainstorming

Clustering

KEEPING NOTEBOOKS AND JOURNALS

Double-Entry Notebook

Field Notebook

Vocabulary Journal

Expanding the Journal Concept

REWRITING YOUR CLASS NOTES

Minute Paper

Muddiest Point

Preconception Check

Paraphrasing

ORGANIZING AND SYNTHESIZING INFORMATION

Invented Dialogue

Invented Interview/UnsentLetter

Résumé/Vita

Bio-Poem

USING CHARTS AND VISUALS TO DISCOVER AND TO LEARN

Clustering and Concept Mapping

Process Flowchart

Time Line/Chronology

Pedigree Chart

STUDYING FOR EXAMS

Test Questions

Mnemonic Play

Part 2: Using What You've Learned to Share Information

4. Writing to Share Experiences

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Share Experiences in Your College Classes

Writing to Share Experiences for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations in Sharing Your Experiences

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Writing about Experiences

Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Narratives That Share Experiences

Russell Baker, On Becoming a Writer

Tanya Barrientos, Se Habla Español

Charles Ogletree, from All Deliberate Speed

Thinking about Visuals That Share Experiences

Drawing on Research about Experiences

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Visualizing Variations: Using Photos and Documents as Sources

Organizing Your Ideas and Details

Constructing a Complete Draft

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER SHARES HER EXPERIENCES: JESSICA HEMAUER’S FINAL DRAFT

Jessica Hemauer, Farm Girl

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

5. Writing to Explore

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Explore in Your College Classes

Writing to Explore For Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations for Exploratory Writing

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Exploratory Writing

Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Texts That Explore

Kenneth Chang, Scientist at Work: Terence Tao; Journeys to the Distant Fields of Prime

Michael Wolff, Bipolar Iraq

P.J O’Rourke, Memoir Essay

Thinking About Visuals That Explore

Drawing on Research to Explore Your Subject

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Organizing Your Ideas and Details

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Using Visuals to Make Your Exploration Clear

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER SHARES HIS EXPLORATION: RICK MOHLER’S FINAL DRAFT

Rick Mohler, A Sporting Career?

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

6. Writing to Inform

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Inform in Your College Classes

Writing to Inform for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations in Informative Writing

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Informative Writing

Reading, Writing, and Research: Learning from Texts That Inform

Harold Peterson, The Man Who Invented Baseball

Carol Ezzell, Clocking Cultures
Katie Hafner, Growing Wikipedia Revises Its ‘Anyone Can Edit’ Policy

Thinking about Visuals That Inform

Drawing on Research to Inform Your Readers

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Organizing Your Information and Research

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Using a Web Site, Poster, or Brochure to Inform Your Readers

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER INFORMS HIS READERS: CRAIG BROADBENT’S FINAL DRAFT

Craig Broadbent, Watch for the Blue Barrels

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

7. Writing to Analyze

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Analyze in your College Classes

Writing to Analyze For Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations in Analytical Writing

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Analytical Writing

Reading, Writing, and Research: Learning from Texts That Analyze

James M. Lang, Putting In the Hours

John Rockhold, Pay Less at the Pump: The Hybrid Revolution

Tamara Draut, All Work and No Play

Thinking about Visuals That Analyze

Drawing on Research to Analyze Your Subject

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Organizing Your Information

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Using Charts and Graphs to Make Your Analysis Clear

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER SHARES HER ANALYSIS: SARAH WASHINGTON’S FINAL DRAFT

Sarah Washington, Campus Parking: Love It or Leave It

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

Part 3 Using What You’ve Learned to Write Arguments

8. Writing to Convince

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Convince in Your College Classes

Writing to Convince for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations for Persuasive Writing

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Persuasive Writing

Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Texts That Persuade

Anne Applebaum, When Women Go to War

Maureen Dowd, Our Own Warrior Princess, and Brian J. G. Pereira, M.D., Letter responding to Dowd

Arthur Levine and Jeanette S. Cureton, Collegiate Life: An Obituary

Thinking about Visuals That Persuade

Drawing on Research to Persuade your Reader

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Reviewing Your Invention and Research

Organizing Your Information

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Using Charts and Photographs to Support Your Claim

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER SHARES HIS PERSUASIVE WRITING: SANTI DEROSA’S FINAL DRAFT

Santi DeRosa, The Objectification of Women: Whose Fault Is It?

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

9. Writing to Evaluate

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Evaluate in Your College Classes

Writing to Evaluate for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations for Evaluative Writing

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Texts That Evaluate

Roger Ebert, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Elvis Mitchell, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Matthew Power, Immersion Journalism

Thinking about Visuals That Evaluate

Drawing on Research for Your Evaluation

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Reviewing Your Invention and Research

Organizing Your Evaluation

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Using Visuals to Support Your Evaluation

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER SHARES HER EVALUATION: ANNLEE LAWRENCE’S FINAL DRAFT

Annlee Lawrence, Who Has the Healthier Burger?

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

10. Writing to Explain Causes and Effects

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing about Causes and Effects in Your College Classes

Writing about Causes and Effects for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations in Cause-Effect Writing

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Writing about Causes and Effects

Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Texts That Explain Cause-and-Effect Relationships

Juan Williams, Brown v. Board of Education

Bruce Nussbaum, Where Are the Jobs?

Neal Gabler, How Urban Myths Reveal Society's Fears

Thinking About Visuals That Indicate Cause-and-Effect

Drawing on Research to Demonstrate Causes or Effects

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Organizing Your Cause-Effect Paper

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Choosing Visuals That Illustrate Cause-and-Effect Relationships

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER SHARES HER CAUSAL ANALYSIS: DEBORAH SCHLEGEL’S FINAL DRAFT

Deborah Schlegel, Weather Forecast: Bikinis or Parkas?

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

11. Writing to Solve Problems

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing to Solve Problems in Your College Classes

Writing to Solve Problems for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations in Writing to Solve Problems

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Problem-Solving

Reading, Writing, and Research: Learning from Texts That Propose Solutions

Michelle Mise Pollard, The Nursing Crisis: The Solution Lies Within

Thomas L. Friedman, World War III

Michael Bérubé, How to End Grade Inflation

Thinking about Visuals That Present a Problem and Give a Solution

Drawing on Research to Solve Problems

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Organizing Your Information

Constructing a Complete Draft

Visualizing Variations: Alternative Forms for Solving Problems

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

Writing in Action: Convention in Genre and Design

A WRITER PROPOSES HER SOLUTION: ESTHER ELLSWORTH’S FINAL DRAFT

Esther Ellsworth, Comprehensive Land Use Planning in Arizona

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

12. Writing about a Creative Work

RHETORICAL KNOWLEDGE

Writing about a Creative Work in Your College Classes

Writing about a Creative Work for Life

Scenarios for Writing: Assignment Options

Writing for College

Writing for Life

Rhetorical Considerations for Writing about a Creative Work

CRITICAL THINKING, READING, AND WRITING

Learning the Qualities of Effective Writing about a Creative Work

Reading, Inquiry, and Research: Learning from Literary Works

Don DeLillo, Videotape

John Edgar Wideman, Ascent by Balloon from the Yard of Walnut Street Jail

Amy Tan, Alien Relative

Thinking about Visuals When Writing about Creative Works

Drawing on Research

WRITING PROCESSES

Invention: Getting Started

Visualizing Variations: Selecting a Creative Work to Write about

Exploring Your Ideas with Research

Organizing Your Ideas and Details

Constructing a Complete Draft

Revising

Responding to Readers’ Comments

KNOWLEDGE OF CONVENTIONS

Editing

Genres, Documentation, and Format

A WRITER SHARES HER WRITING ABOUT A CREATIVE WORK: HANNA EARLEY’S FINAL DRAFT

Hanna Earley, That Doesn't Mean We Want Him to Stop: Suspense in Don DeLillo's "Videotape"

SELF-ASSESSMENT: REFLECTING ON YOUR LEARNING GOALS

Part 4: Strategies for Effective Communication

13. Using Rhetorical Strategies that Guide Readers

ANNOUNCING A THESIS OR CONTROLLING IDEAWRITING PARAGRAPHS

Placement of Topic Sentences

Moving to a New Paragraph

Opening Paragraphs

Concluding Paragraphs

USING COHESIVE DEVICES

Using Connective Words and Phrases

Using Transitional Sentences and Paragraphs

Using Headings and Subheadings

USING ORGANIZING STRATEGIES

WRITING NARRATIVES

WRITING DESCRIPTIONS

WRITING DEFINITIONS

WRITING CLASSIFICATIONS

WRITING ABOUT COMPARISONS AND CONTRASTS USING OUTLINES AND MAPS TO ORGANIZE YOUR WRITING

14. Using Strategies that Persuade Readers

ARGUMENT AND PERSUASION

RHETORICAL APPEALS

Logical Appeals

Ethical Appeals

Emotional Appeals

The Rhetorical Triangle: Considering the Appeals Together

THREE APPROACHES TO ARGUMENT

Classical Strategies for Arguing

Jaron Lanier, Beware the Online Collective

Toulmin Strategies for Arguing

Stanley Fish, But I Didn't Do It!

Rogerian Strategies for Arguing

Rick Reilly, Nothing but Nets

SOME COMMON FLAWS IN ARGUMENTS

15. Using Strategies for Collaboration

WORKING WITH PEERS ON YOUR SINGLE-AUTHORED PROJECTS

Strategies for Working with Peers on Your Projects

Using Digital Tools for Peer Review

Using Catalyst for Peer Review

WORKING WITH PEERS ON MULTIPLE-AUTHORED PROJECTS

Strategies for Working with Peers Effectively

Using Digital Tools for Facilitating Multi-Authored Projects

16. Making Effective Oral Presentations

DEVELOPING YOUR PRESENTATION

ESTABLISHING A CLEAR STRUCTURE

CONSIDERING YOUR AUDIENCE

ELIMINATING THE FEAR OF SPEAKING IN PUBLIC

IMPROMPTU PRESENTATIONS

Part 5: Technologies for Effective Communication

17. Choosing a Medium, Genre, and Technology for Your Communication

COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

PUBLISHING YOUR WORK

SELECTING A GENRE AND A MEDIUM

Deciding on a Genre for Your Work

Deciding Whether to Use Print, Electronic, or Oral Media

Considering Design

TECHNOLOGIES FOR COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION

E-mail

Threaded Discussions

Synchronous Chat

Blogs

Word-Processing Software

Peer Review Applications

Graphics Software

Desktop Publishing Software

Presentation Software

Technologies for Constructing Web Pages

18. Communicating with Design and Visuals

PRINCIPLES OF DOCUMENT DESIGN

Proximity

Contrast

Alignment

Repetition (or Consistency)

COMMON KINDS OF VISUAL TEXTS

Tables

Bar and Line Graphs

Charts

Photographs

Drawings

Diagrams

Maps

Cartoons

USING VISUALS RHETORICALLY

Considering Your Audience

Considering Your Purpose

USING VISUALS RESPONSIBLY

Permissions

Distortions

Part 6: Using Research for Informed Communication

19. Finding and Evaluating Information from Sources and the Field

CONDUCTING EFFECTIVE RESEARCH: AN EXAMPLE

Library Research

Research on the World Wide Web

SELECTING SOURCES

Books

Academic Journals

Newspapers

Popular Magazines

Trade or Commercial Magazines

Public Affairs Magazines

Specialty Magazines

Th Internet

EVALUATING YOUR SOURCES: ASKING THE REPORTER’S QUESTIONS

Who Is the Author?

What Is the Text About? What Is the Quality of the Information?

When Was the Text Published or the Web Site Last Updated?

Why Was This Information Published?

Where Was the Item Published?

How Accurate Is the Information in This Source?

FIELD RESEARCH

Working with Human Subjects

Informed Consent

Observations

Interviews

Surveys and Questionnaires

20. Synthesizing and Documenting Sources

QUOTATIONS

PARAPHRASES

SUMMARIES

ELLIPSIS

MLA DOCUMENTATION STYLE

MLA Style: In-Text Citation

MLA Style: Constructing a List of Works Cited

MLA Style: Sample Student Paper

APA DOCUMENTATION STYLE

APA Style: In-Text Citation

APA Style: Constructing a References List

APA Style: Sample Student Paper

Appendix A: Constructing a Course Portfolio

Appendix B: Essay Examinations

Appendix C: Standard Forms: Letters, Memos, and Other Documents
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