MCSE Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Administration Readiness Review: Exam 70-224 with CD-ROM

Overview


Microsoft ""RM"" Certified Professional (MCP) Exam 70-224 measures ability to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server. With Readiness Review, certification candidates can sharpen their test-taking skills, save valuable time and money, and build their confidence for the real exam with the help of this exclusive MCP exam simulation on CD-ROM. The Readiness Review electronic assessment tool delivers randomly generated, 60-question practice tests covering actual MCP exam objectives. Readers...
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Overview


Microsoft ""RM"" Certified Professional (MCP) Exam 70-224 measures ability to install, configure, and administer Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server. With Readiness Review, certification candidates can sharpen their test-taking skills, save valuable time and money, and build their confidence for the real exam with the help of this exclusive MCP exam simulation on CD-ROM. The Readiness Review electronic assessment tool delivers randomly generated, 60-question practice tests covering actual MCP exam objectives. Readers can test and retest with different question sets each time. After completing practice sessions, readers can consult the companion text for helpful explanations for all responses -- right and wrong -- and identify areas for further study.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This study guide reviews the procedures for installing and upgrading the Exchange 2000 server, configuring servers and resources, managing recipient objects, troubleshooting messaging connectivity, monitoring growth, and restoring system functionality and user data. The CD-ROM simulates an exam with sample questions. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735612433
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 4/14/2001
  • Series: MCSE Readiness Review Series
  • Edition description: BK&CD-ROM
  • Pages: 263
  • Product dimensions: 7.39 (w) x 9.01 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Bill English, MCTS, MVP, MCT, is an author and educator specializing in SharePoint technologies. He runs a leading training and consulting company, has written more than 10 books, and speaks at the Microsoft Office SharePoint Conference, Comdex, and other events.

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Read an Excerpt

Obective Domain 3: Managing Recipient Objects

In the practice exercises recommended in Objective Domain 1, you migrated recipients from Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 into Exchange 2000 Server. You saw that your network environment, which had been using separate databases for security and messaging, merged to create one Active Directory directory service. Now, as an administrator, your job just became easier. You no longer need to configure your users multiple times. Messaging properties are now just another set of user properties to be configured at the user object. This domain looks at how to configure mail recipients by using Active Directory tools, enabling them to take advantage of Exchange 2000 services such as e-mail, Instant Messaging (IM), and Chat. This objective domain also addresses some performance, security, and disaster-recovery considerations when planning your database design.

The vision of new technology is to continuously make the user's experience simpler and, thereby, more productive. Using distribution groups and especially security groups will help users with their bulk mailings. Careful planning of groups is more important than ever, now that they're integrated into Active Directory. This objective domain will also explore the options available for efficiently grouping recipients using customized address lists, making directory look-ups more concise. Understanding a service goes a long way when you need to troubleshoot. In this case, you'll want to understand how the Recipient Update Service (RUS) maintains and updates the address lists.

To satisfy the requirements of this objective domain, please keep in mind the important role that Active Directory plays when you plan an Exchange 2000 infrastructure.

Tested Skills and Suggested Practices

The skills that you need to successfully master the Managing Recipient Objects objective domain on the Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server exam include:
  • Configuring an Active Directory user object for messaging.
    • Practice 1: If you successfully completed Practice 3 recommended in the second skill of Objective Domain 1, you already have some Active Directory user objects. If not, practice creating user objects, but don't create a mailbox. Next, right-click the user object you just created and compare the differences between mail-enabling a user and mailbox-enabling a user. Then open the Exchange System MMC snap-in in the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) and find the message-enabled accounts that you just configured. Right-click those mail entries. Notice that there are no properties. Go back to Active Directory Users and Computers and become familiar with the Exchange configuration options for the various types of message-enabled accounts. Be sure to enable the view for Advanced Features.
    • Practice 2: If you successfully completed Practice 5 of the first skill in Objective Domain 2, you'll already have your Exchange 2000 server configured for Instant Messaging. If not, go back and complete that practice. Install Instant Messaging client software from the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Then use the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to enable Instant Messaging for your user object. Log on to your Instant Messaging server.
    • Practice 3: Install Chat Service from the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Open Microsoft NetMeeting by going to Start, choosing Programs, Accessories, and then Communication. If it isn't there, install the client Chat software using Control Panel, choosing Add/Remove Programs, and then Add/Remove Windows Components. Send a message using Chat.
  • Managing user and information store association.
    • Practice 1: Right-click a mailbox-enabled object and select Move Mailbox. If you completed Practice 1 for the first skill in Objective Domain 2, you should have multiple storage groups. Move this mailbox to a different database.
    • Practice 2: Select a mailbox-enabled user and confirm that the mailbox store for that user has deleted mailbox retention enabled. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, delete the user account. Confirm that the mailbox is still in the mailbox store, but now it should show as marked for deletion with a red x. Recreate the user object in Active Directory and reconnect the mailbox to the new user object. If the mailbox doesn't display the red x, run Cleanup Agent.
  • Diagnosing and resolving problems that involve user and information store placement.
    • Practice 1: Using Windows Explorer, view the location of the Exchange database log files located in the \Mdbdata folder. Access the properties of the second storage group and change the path for the log files. Confirm that they moved to the new folder. Never drag and drop log files or database files. You might receive adverse results.
    • Practice 2: Enable circular logging on the second storage group. Attempt to perform a differential backup by choosing Accessories and then System Tools.
  • Creating and managing address lists.
    • Practice 1: Using the Active Directory Users and Groups MMC snap-in, create a global security group and a domain local security group. After you've created both groups, access the properties for each and notice whether they can be changed into another type of group. Notice whether they can be changed from a security group into a distribution group.
    • Practice 2: Using the Active Directory Users and Groups MMC snap-in, create a global distribution group and a domain local distribution group. After you have created both groups, access the properties for each and notice whether they can be changed into another type of group. Notice whether they can be changed back into a security group.
    • Practice 3: Access the properties for at least three of the user objects you've created that have mail capabilities, and configure all three to have the same values in the City and Department fields. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, create a custom address list and set the filter to search the City and Department fields you used for the users. Using Microsoft Outlook, find the lists you just created. You might need to stop and restart Outlook for the address book to refresh.
  • Diagnosing and resolving RUS problems.
    • Practice 1: Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, select the Recipient container to access RUS (organization_name) properties. Observe the configurable options: Exchange server, Windows 2000 Domain Controller, Update interval. Reset the Update interval to run every hour.
    • Practice 2: Access the properties for a user object in Active Directory. Fill in the City and Department property fields with the same values you used in Objective 3.4, Practice 3, when you created the address lists. View the address list in Outlook. Is the user you just updated visible? Return to the service and select Update Now. Is the user now visible in Outlook? You might need to stop and restart Outlook for the address book to refresh.

Further Reading

This section lists supplemental readings by objective. We recommend that you study these sources thoroughly before taking exam 70-224.

Objective 3.1

Microsoft Corporation and Kay Unkroth. MCSE Training Kit—Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Implementation and Administration. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2001. See Chapter 25, "Real-Time Collaboration." This chapter discusses the implementation and configuration of Chat, Instant Messaging, and Conferencing. It also includes practice exercises for Chat and Instant Messaging.

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Planning and Installation. 2000. See Chapter 5, "Active Directory," which provides an overview of the Active Directory objects integrated into Exchange 2000 Server. To access this document, run Launch.exe on the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Select Documentation, and then select Planning and Installation. This manual is also available by searching for "Exchange 2000 Server Documentation" at http://www.microsoft.com/exchange.

English, Bill, and Walter J. Glenn. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Administrator's Companion. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 18, "Administering Chat Service," and Chapter 19, "Supporting Instant Messaging." Both chapters contain in-depth discussion and real-world scenarios to help understand and configure the respective service.

Visit http://www.microsoft.com/windows/netmeeting for more information on Chat, NetMeeting, and free downloads.

Objective 3.2

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 28, "Backup and Restore," and review the "Restoring a Single Mailbox" section. This section provides a step-by-step procedure to recover a mailbox after deleting a user account.

Microsoft Corporation. "XADM: How to Recover a Deleted Mailbox in Exchange 2000." This Knowledge Base article is available by searching for Q274343 at http://www.microsoft.com. This provides a step-by-step guide for recovering a deleted mailbox.

Objective 3.3

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Planning and Installation. 2000. See Chapter 6, "Administration," and review the "Address Lists," "Types of Address Lists," and "Address List Management" sections. See Chapter 7, "Information Store," which describes considerations for store placement. To access this document, run Launch.exe on the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Select Documentation, and then select Planning and Installation. This manual is also available by searching for "Exchange 2000 Server Documentation" at http://www.microsoft.com/exchange.

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 4, "Active Directory Design," and review the "Active Directory Groups" and "Exchange 2000 and Groups" sections. See Chapter 10, "Preparing an Existing Environment" and review the "Circular Logging" section. A clear understanding of group structure is more important in an Exchange 2000 deployment than it was with Exchange Server 5.5, and these sections contain must-know information covering these topics.

Objective 3.4

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 4, "Active Directory Design," and review the "Active Directory Groups" and "Exchange 2000 and Groups" sections.

Microsoft Corporation and Kay Unkroth. MCSE Training Kit—Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Implementation and Administration. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2001. See Chapter 14, "Managing Server Configuration," and review Lesson 3, "Management of Server Address Lists."

Objective 3.5

Microsoft Corporation. "XADM: How the Recipient Update Service Populates Address Lists." 2000. This Knowledge Base article is available by searching for Q253828 at http://www.microsoft.com. This is a helpful discussion regarding the use of the Recipient Update Service and how it is used to update address lists.

Microsoft Corporation. "XADM: Tasks Performed by the Recipient Update Service." 2000. This Knowledge Base article is available by searching for Q253770 at http://www.microsoft.com. It is a description of the tasks performed by the Recipient Update Service.

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 17, "Backbone Configuration and Tuning," and review the "Recipient Update Service" section. This section discusses how to provide the service for domains that don't have an Exchange 2000 server....

3.1 Configure a user object for messaging.

Active Directory is the database that stores all the configuration information for all your directory objects. This includes configuration options for messaging. The beauty of this implementation is that you no longer have multiple databases for your users that you're responsible for maintaining. Exchange properties are now user object properties that are managed through the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in. Exchange properties become part of the Active Directory schema when Exchange 2000 Server is installed on the first server in the forest. These properties are configurable on a per-user basis, once the user is messaging enabled.

Various options are available for message-enabling user accounts. Mailbox-enabled users are Exchange recipients that are also security principals. These Active Directory objects have access to network resources when their account appears on the resource DACL, and they receive and store their mail on the Exchange server. Mail-enabled users are Active Directory security principals, but they don't receive and store mail on the Exchange server. They appear in the organization's address list, but their address is outside the organization. This type of recipient is a contact with access to network resources and it is new to Exchange 2000 Server. Mail-enabled contacts are Active Directory objects representing recipients that don't receive or store mail on the Exchange server and don't have access to network resources. This type of recipient is created to allow mail recipients outside the organization to appear in the company's address lists so they can easily be included in bulk mailings.

Mail-enabled groups are Active Directory objects used for bulk mailings. Now that the Exchange directory database is actually the Active Directory, you have the option to use the groups you create for bulk mailings and grant the group membership access to network resources.

To answer the questions in this objective, you should be familiar with the configuration options available for enabling messaging to suit the needs of individual users.


Don't forget to select Advanced Features in the Active Directory Users and Groups MMC snap-in when preparing to configure Recipient Objects. This option is required to set Mailbox Rights.

MCS

70-224.03.01.001

B

You're the mail administrator for your company, and you've been asked to create a single mailbox to receive all messages sent to the Webmaster. Six employees are responsible for responding to mail sent to the Webmaster. What will you do to accomplish this goal?

A. Create a Webmaster mailbox without associating it with a primary logon account. Use the Exchange Advanced tab in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to assign rights to the required six employees.

Incorrect

A. A mailbox isn't an object with user properties. A user is an object with messaging properties. Therefore, you must first create a user object and then you can mailbox-enable it. Once you do this, you can access the Exchange Advanced tab for the user and give rights to the required employees.

B. Use the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to create a user, and mailbox-enable the user object. In the user's properties on the Exchange Advanced tab, use the Mailbox Rights button to assign appropriate permissions to the six employees.

Correct

B. You must enable Advanced Features from the View menu in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to see this tab.

C. Create a mail-enabled group called Webmaster. Give membership to the six employees.

Incorrect

C. This option doesn't provide for a single mailbox to receive all mail. By creating a mail-enabled group called Webmaster, any mail sent to the group will appear in all six mailboxes.

D. On the e-mail Addresses tab for each of the six employees, create a secondary Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) address for webmaster@your_company.com.

Incorrect

D. Users can't have duplicate e-mail addresses.

MCS

70-224.03.01.002

D

You're the Exchange administrator for your company. Your company has recently hired a contractor to help on a project that will conclude in thirty days. You need to create an account for him so his name will be visible in your company's address list, making it easy for all users to send him e-mail. You want to include him in distribution groups, and you want him to have access to the network information required for the project. You don't want to create a mailbox for him in your information store. How would you set up his account?

A. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a user object and click the check box Create An Exchange Mailbox. When asked for his e-mail address, enter his personal SMTP address.

Incorrect

A. When creating a new user object in Active Directory directory service and creating a mailbox, you'll be doing just that. You'll have the option to select a storage group, but you won't have the option to create a remote SMTP address.

B. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a contact object for him and clear the Create An Exchange E-Mail Address check box. Use his personal address as his SMTP address.

Incorrect

B. By clearing the Create An Exchange E-Mail Address check box, his name won't appear in the address list. He must have an e-mail address to appear in the address list. He won't be able to access network resources.

C. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a contact object for him and create an Exchange e-mail address. Use his personal address as his SMTP address.

Incorrect

C. By performing this action, you'll be creating a contact object in Active Directory. This user will be visible in the address list but won't be able to access network resources.

D. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a user object and clear the Create An Exchange Mailbox check box for him. After the user object is created, right-click his name and establish an e-mail address for this user.

Correct

D. By creating a user object rather than a contact object, you'll allow him access to network resources. By clearing the Create An Exchange Mailbox check box, you won't be creating storage space for him in your information store. By establishing an e-mail address for his user object, his name will appear in the Global Address List (GAL).

MCM

70-224.03.01.003

B and C

Your company has partnered with another company across town to work on a three-month project. As the messaging administrator, you've been asked to simplify messaging for the duration of the project. The employees from the other firm don't need to access any of your network resources. What's the best way to achieve this goal? (Choose all that apply.)

A. Create a user object in Active Directory for each of the remote employees involved with the project. Clear the Create An Exchange Mailbox check box.

Incorrect

A. This check box will create a user object with access to network resources.

B. Create a new contact for each of the remote employees involved with the project. Click the check box Create An Exchange E-Mail address.

Correct

B. A contact is the Active Directory object that allows a name to be visible in the Global Address List (GAL) even when the person isn't receiving mail from your Exchange server. You must create an Exchange e-mail address for the contact to be visible in the GAL.

C. Create a domain local distribution group and populate it with the mail-enabled objects you created for the remote employees.

Correct

C. By creating a distribution group, your users will be able to send bulk mail to the remote users. A distribution group works best because these users don't need to access network resources. Otherwise, a security group would be a better choice.

D. Create a domain local security group and populate it with the mail-enabled objects you created for the remote employees.

Incorrect

D. Although it's possible to include a contact in a security group, this option isn't the best because these users don't need to access network resources.

E. Create a new contact for each of the remote employees involved with the project. Clear the Create An Exchange E-Mail Address check box.

Incorrect

E. You must select Create An Exchange E-Mail Address for the contact to be visible in the GAL....

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Table of Contents

Welcome to Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server
Objective Domain 1: Installing and Upgrading Exchange 2000 Server 1
Objective 1.1: Install Exchange 2000 Server on a server computer
Objective 1.2: Diagnose and resolve failed installations
Objective 1.3: Upgrade or migrate to Exchange 2000 Server from Exchange Server 5.5
Objective 1.4: Diagnose and resolve problems involving the upgrade process
Objective 1.5: Manage coexistence with Exchange Server 5.5
Objective 1.6: Diagnose and resolve Exchange 2000 Active Directory Connector problems
Objective 1.7: Perform client deployments
Objective Domain 2: Configuring Exchange 2000 Server
Objective 2.1: Configure server objects for messaging and collaboration to support the assigned server role
Objective 2.2: Create and manage administrative groups
Objective 2.3: Configure separate Exchange 2000 Server resources for high-volume access
Objective 2.4: Diagnose and resolve Exchange 2000 Server availability and performance problems
Objective 2.5: Configure Exchange 2000 Server for high security
Objective 2.6: Create, configure, and manage a public folder solution
Objective 2.7: Configure and manage system folders.
Objective Domain 3: Managing Recipient Objects
Objective 3.1: Configure a user object for messaging
Objective 3.2: Manage user and information store association.
Objective 3.3: Diagnose and resolve problems that involve user and information store placement
Objective 3.4: Create and manage address lists.
Objective 3.5: Diagnose and resolve Recipient Update Service problems
Objective Domain 4: Monitoring and Managing Messaging Connectivity
Objective 4.1: Manage and troubleshoot messaging connectivity
Objective 4.2: Manage messaging queues for multiple protocols
Objective 4.3: Monitor link status
Objective 4.4: Configure and monitor client connectivity
Objective 4.5: Diagnose and resolve client connectivity problems
Objective 4.6: Manage public folder connectivity
Objective Domain 5: Managing Exchange 2000 Server Growth
Objective 5.1: Monitor services use
Objective 5.2: Manage growth of public and private message store databases
Objective 5.3: Manage growth of user population and message traffic
Objective 5.4: Monitor the growth of client use
Objective 5.5: Manage recipient and server policies
Objective 5.6: Diagnose and resolve problems that involve recipient and server policies
Objective 5.7: Optimize public folder and mailbox searching.
Objective Domain 6: Restoring System Functionality and User Data
Objective 6.1: Apply a backup and restore plan
Objective 6.2: Diagnose and resolve backup and restore problems
Objective 6.3: Restore user data and system state data
Objective 6.4: Restore information stores
Objective 6.5: Configure a server for disaster recovery
Objective 6.6: Diagnose and resolve security problems that involve user keys
Glossary
Index
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First Chapter

Obective Domain 3Managing Recipient Objects
    • Tested Skills and Suggested Practices
    • Objective 3.1
    • Objective 3.2
    • Objective 3.3
    • Objective 3.4
    • Objective 3.5
  • 3.1 Configure a user object for messaging.
  • 3.2 Manage user and information store association.
  • 3.3 Diagnose and resolve problems that involve user and information store placement.
  • 3.4 Create and manage address lists.
  • 3.5 Diagnose and resolve Recipient Update Service problems.

Obective Domain 3 Managing Recipient Objects

In the practice exercises recommended in Objective Domain 1, you migrated recipients from Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 into Exchange 2000 Server. You saw that your network environment, which had been using separate databases for security and messaging, merged to create one Active Directory directory service. Now, as an administrator, your job just became easier. You no longer need to configure your users multiple times. Messaging properties are now just another set of user properties to be configured at the user object. This domain looks at how to configure mail recipients by using Active Directory tools, enabling them to take advantage of Exchange 2000 services such as e-mail, Instant Messaging (IM), and Chat. This objective domain also addresses some performance, security, and disaster-recovery considerations when planning your database design.

The vision of new technology is to continuously make the user’s experience simpler and, thereby, more productive. Using distribution groups and especially security groups will help users with their bulk mailings. Careful planning of groups is more important than ever, now that they’re integrated into Active Directory. This objective domain will also explore the options available for efficiently grouping recipients using customized address lists, making directory look-ups more concise. Understanding a service goes a long way when you need to troubleshoot. In this case, you’ll want to understand how the Recipient Update Service (RUS) maintains and updates the address lists.

To satisfy the requirements of this objective domain, please keep in mind the important role that Active Directory plays when you plan an Exchange 2000 infrastructure.

Tested Skills and Suggested Practices

The skills that you need to successfully master the Managing Recipient Objects objective domain on the Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server exam include:

  • Configuring an Active Directory user object for messaging.
    • Practice 1: If you successfully completed Practice 3 recommended in the second skill of Objective Domain 1, you already have some Active Directory user objects. If not, practice creating user objects, but don’t create a mailbox. Next, right-click the user object you just created and compare the differences between mail-enabling a user and mailbox-enabling a user. Then open the Exchange System MMC snap-in in the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) and find the message-enabled accounts that you just configured. Right-click those mail entries. Notice that there are no properties. Go back to Active Directory Users and Computers and become familiar with the Exchange configuration options for the various types of message-enabled accounts. Be sure to enable the view for Advanced Features.
    • Practice 2: If you successfully completed Practice 5 of the first skill in Objective Domain 2, you’ll already have your Exchange 2000 server configured for Instant Messaging. If not, go back and complete that practice. Install Instant Messaging client software from the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Then use the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to enable Instant Messaging for your user object. Log on to your Instant Messaging server.
    • Practice 3: Install Chat Service from the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Open Microsoft NetMeeting by going to Start, choosing Programs, Accessories, and then Communication. If it isn’t there, install the client Chat software using Control Panel, choosing Add/Remove Programs, and then Add/Remove Windows Components. Send a message using Chat.
  • Managing user and information store association.
    • Practice 1: Right-click a mailbox-enabled object and select Move Mailbox. If you completed Practice 1 for the first skill in Objective Domain 2, you should have multiple storage groups. Move this mailbox to a different database.
    • Practice 2: Select a mailbox-enabled user and confirm that the mailbox store for that user has deleted mailbox retention enabled. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, delete the user account. Confirm that the mailbox is still in the mailbox store, but now it should show as marked for deletion with a red x. Recreate the user object in Active Directory and reconnect the mailbox to the new user object. If the mailbox doesn’t display the red x, run Cleanup Agent.
  • Diagnosing and resolving problems that involve user and information store placement.
    • Practice 1: Using Windows Explorer, view the location of the Exchange database log files located in the \Mdbdata folder. Access the properties of the second storage group and change the path for the log files. Confirm that they moved to the new folder. Never drag and drop log files or database files. You might receive adverse results.
    • Practice 2: Enable circular logging on the second storage group. Attempt to perform a differential backup by choosing Accessories and then System Tools.
  • Creating and managing address lists.
    • Practice 1: Using the Active Directory Users and Groups MMC snap-in, create a global security group and a domain local security group. After you’ve created both groups, access the properties for each and notice whether they can be changed into another type of group. Notice whether they can be changed from a security group into a distribution group.
    • Practice 2: Using the Active Directory Users and Groups MMC snap-in, create a global distribution group and a domain local distribution group. After you have created both groups, access the properties for each and notice whether they can be changed into another type of group. Notice whether they can be changed back into a security group.
    • Practice 3: Access the properties for at least three of the user objects you’ve created that have mail capabilities, and configure all three to have the same values in the City and Department fields. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, create a custom address list and set the filter to search the City and Department fields you used for the users. Using Microsoft Outlook, find the lists you just created. You might need to stop and restart Outlook for the address book to refresh.
  • Diagnosing and resolving RUS problems.
    • Practice 1: Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, select the Recipient container to access RUS (organization_name) properties. Observe the configurable options: Exchange server, Windows 2000 Domain Controller, Update interval. Reset the Update interval to run every hour.
    • Practice 2: Access the properties for a user object in Active Directory. Fill in the City and Department property fields with the same values you used in Objective 3.4, Practice 3, when you created the address lists. View the address list in Outlook. Is the user you just updated visible? Return to the service and select Update Now. Is the user now visible in Outlook? You might need to stop and restart Outlook for the address book to refresh.

Further Reading

This section lists supplemental readings by objective. We recommend that you study these sources thoroughly before taking exam 70-224.

Objective 3.1

Microsoft Corporation and Kay Unkroth. MCSE Training Kit—Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Implementation and Administration. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2001. See Chapter 25, "Real-Time Collaboration." This chapter discusses the implementation and configuration of Chat, Instant Messaging, and Conferencing. It also includes practice exercises for Chat and Instant Messaging.

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Planning and Installation. 2000. See Chapter 5, "Active Directory," which provides an overview of the Active Directory objects integrated into Exchange 2000 Server. To access this document, run Launch.exe on the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Select Documentation, and then select Planning and Installation. This manual is also available by searching for "Exchange 2000 Server Documentation" at http://www.microsoft.com/exchange.

English, Bill, and Walter J. Glenn. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Administrator’s Companion. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 18, "Administering Chat Service," and Chapter 19, "Supporting Instant Messaging." Both chapters contain in-depth discussion and real-world scenarios to help understand and configure the respective service.

Visit http://www.microsoft.com/windows/netmeeting for more information on Chat, NetMeeting, and free downloads.

Objective 3.2

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 28, "Backup and Restore," and review the "Restoring a Single Mailbox" section. This section provides a step-by-step procedure to recover a mailbox after deleting a user account.

Microsoft Corporation. "XADM: How to Recover a Deleted Mailbox in Exchange 2000." This Knowledge Base article is available by searching for Q274343 at http://www.microsoft.com. This provides a step-by-step guide for recovering a deleted mailbox.

Objective 3.3

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Planning and Installation. 2000. See Chapter 6, "Administration," and review the "Address Lists," "Types of Address Lists," and "Address List Management" sections. See Chapter 7, "Information Store," which describes considerations for store placement. To access this document, run Launch.exe on the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM. Select Documentation, and then select Planning and Installation. This manual is also available by searching for "Exchange 2000 Server Documentation" at http://www.microsoft.com/exchange.

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 4, "Active Directory Design," and review the "Active Directory Groups" and "Exchange 2000 and Groups" sections. See Chapter 10, "Preparing an Existing Environment" and review the "Circular Logging" section. A clear understanding of group structure is more important in an Exchange 2000 deployment than it was with Exchange Server 5.5, and these sections contain must-know information covering these topics.

Objective 3.4

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 4, "Active Directory Design," and review the "Active Directory Groups" and "Exchange 2000 and Groups" sections.

Microsoft Corporation and Kay Unkroth. MCSE Training Kit—Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Implementation and Administration. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2001. See Chapter 14, "Managing Server Configuration," and review Lesson 3, "Management of Server Address Lists."

Objective 3.5

Microsoft Corporation. "XADM: How the Recipient Update Service Populates Address Lists." 2000. This Knowledge Base article is available by searching for Q253828 at http://www.microsoft.com. This is a helpful discussion regarding the use of the Recipient Update Service and how it is used to update address lists.

Microsoft Corporation. "XADM: Tasks Performed by the Recipient Update Service." 2000. This Knowledge Base article is available by searching for Q253770 at http://www.microsoft.com. It is a description of the tasks performed by the Recipient Update Service.

Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Resource Kit. Redmond, Washington: Microsoft Press, 2000. See Chapter 17, "Backbone Configuration and Tuning," and review the "Recipient Update Service" section. This section discusses how to provide the service for domains that don’t have an Exchange 2000 server.

3.1 Configure a user object for messaging.

Active Directory is the database that stores all the configuration information for all your directory objects. This includes configuration options for messaging. The beauty of this implementation is that you no longer have multiple databases for your users that you’re responsible for maintaining. Exchange properties are now user object properties that are managed through the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in. Exchange properties become part of the Active Directory schema when Exchange 2000 Server is installed on the first server in the forest. These properties are configurable on a per-user basis, once the user is messaging enabled.

Various options are available for message-enabling user accounts. Mailbox-enabled users are Exchange recipients that are also security principals. These Active Directory objects have access to network resources when their account appears on the resource DACL, and they receive and store their mail on the Exchange server. Mail-enabled users are Active Directory security principals, but they don’t receive and store mail on the Exchange server. They appear in the organization’s address list, but their address is outside the organization. This type of recipient is a contact with access to network resources and it is new to Exchange 2000 Server. Mail-enabled contacts are Active Directory objects representing recipients that don’t receive or store mail on the Exchange server and don’t have access to network resources. This type of recipient is created to allow mail recipients outside the organization to appear in the company’s address lists so they can easily be included in bulk mailings.

Mail-enabled groups are Active Directory objects used for bulk mailings. Now that the Exchange directory database is actually the Active Directory, you have the option to use the groups you create for bulk mailings and grant the group membership access to network resources.

To answer the questions in this objective, you should be familiar with the configuration options available for enabling messaging to suit the needs of individual users.


Don’t forget to select Advanced Features in the Active Directory Users and Groups MMC snap-in when preparing to configure Recipient Objects. This option is required to set Mailbox Rights.

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B

You’re the mail administrator for your company, and you’ve been asked to create a single mailbox to receive all messages sent to the Webmaster. Six employees are responsible for responding to mail sent to the Webmaster. What will you do to accomplish this goal?

A. Create a Webmaster mailbox without associating it with a primary logon account. Use the Exchange Advanced tab in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to assign rights to the required six employees.

Incorrect

A. A mailbox isn’t an object with user properties. A user is an object with messaging properties. Therefore, you must first create a user object and then you can mailbox-enable it. Once you do this, you can access the Exchange Advanced tab for the user and give rights to the required employees.

B. Use the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to create a user, and mailbox-enable the user object. In the user’s properties on the Exchange Advanced tab, use the Mailbox Rights button to assign appropriate permissions to the six employees.

Correct

B. You must enable Advanced Features from the View menu in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in to see this tab.

C. Create a mail-enabled group called Webmaster. Give membership to the six employees.

Incorrect

C. This option doesn’t provide for a single mailbox to receive all mail. By creating a mail-enabled group called Webmaster, any mail sent to the group will appear in all six mailboxes.

D. On the e-mail Addresses tab for each of the six employees, create a secondary Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) address for webmaster@your_company.com.

Incorrect

D. Users can’t have duplicate e-mail addresses.

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D

You’re the Exchange administrator for your company. Your company has recently hired a contractor to help on a project that will conclude in thirty days. You need to create an account for him so his name will be visible in your company’s address list, making it easy for all users to send him e-mail. You want to include him in distribution groups, and you want him to have access to the network information required for the project. You don’t want to create a mailbox for him in your information store. How would you set up his account?

A. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a user object and click the check box Create An Exchange Mailbox. When asked for his e-mail address, enter his personal SMTP address.

Incorrect

A. When creating a new user object in Active Directory directory service and creating a mailbox, you’ll be doing just that. You’ll have the option to select a storage group, but you won’t have the option to create a remote SMTP address.

B. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a contact object for him and clear the Create An Exchange E-Mail Address check box. Use his personal address as his SMTP address.

Incorrect

B. By clearing the Create An Exchange E-Mail Address check box, his name won’t appear in the address list. He must have an e-mail address to appear in the address list. He won’t be able to access network resources.

C. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a contact object for him and create an Exchange e-mail address. Use his personal address as his SMTP address.

Incorrect

C. By performing this action, you’ll be creating a contact object in Active Directory. This user will be visible in the address list but won’t be able to access network resources.

D. Using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, create a user object and clear the Create An Exchange Mailbox check box for him. After the user object is created, right-click his name and establish an e-mail address for this user.

Correct

D. By creating a user object rather than a contact object, you’ll allow him access to network resources. By clearing the Create An Exchange Mailbox check box, you won’t be creating storage space for him in your information store. By establishing an e-mail address for his user object, his name will appear in the Global Address List (GAL).

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B and C

Your company has partnered with another company across town to work on a three-month project. As the messaging administrator, you’ve been asked to simplify messaging for the duration of the project. The employees from the other firm don’t need to access any of your network resources. What’s the best way to achieve this goal? (Choose all that apply.)

A. Create a user object in Active Directory for each of the remote employees involved with the project. Clear the Create An Exchange Mailbox check box.

Incorrect

A. This check box will create a user object with access to network resources.

B. Create a new contact for each of the remote employees involved with the project. Click the check box Create An Exchange E-Mail address.

Correct

B. A contact is the Active Directory object that allows a name to be visible in the Global Address List (GAL) even when the person isn’t receiving mail from your Exchange server. You must create an Exchange e-mail address for the contact to be visible in the GAL.

C. Create a domain local distribution group and populate it with the mail-enabled objects you created for the remote employees.

Correct

C. By creating a distribution group, your users will be able to send bulk mail to the remote users. A distribution group works best because these users don’t need to access network resources. Otherwise, a security group would be a better choice.

D. Create a domain local security group and populate it with the mail-enabled objects you created for the remote employees.

Incorrect

D. Although it’s possible to include a contact in a security group, this option isn’t the best because these users don’t need to access network resources.

E. Create a new contact for each of the remote employees involved with the project. Clear the Create An Exchange E-Mail Address check box.

Incorrect

E. You must select Create An Exchange E-Mail Address for the contact to be visible in the GAL.

3.2 Manage user and information store association.

Managing and maintaining the information store database is crucial for a successful Exchange environment. The purpose of this objective is to explain the options available for managing your user’s mailboxes once you’ve created multiple databases. This objective doesn’t cover issues that concern managing and maintaining the database as a whole.

Once you’ve created your users in Active Directory, your storage needs might change, requiring you to change configurations. Such changes might involve the physical location of your user’s mailboxes. Always keep in mind that configuration changes occur in Active Directory Users and Computers. Exchange 2000 Server doesn’t have a dedicated directory database that holds configuration information. If you completed Practice 2 for the second skill in this objective domain, you already encountered the separation of the directory service from the information store. You saw that you can delete a user object, recreate the user object, and reassociate that user with the existing mailbox. Just remember, mailboxes will be visible in the Exchange System MMC snap-in, but they’re configurable only in Active Directory.

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B

You’re the Exchange administrator for your company, and you’ve just deleted one of your employee’s mailboxes by mistake. You’re aware that Exchange 2000 Server supports deleted mailbox retention, so you set the retention period for seven days and attempt to restore the mailbox. What must you do?

A. Right-click the mailbox in the Exchange System MMC snap-in and select Reconnect.

Incorrect

A. Once you delete a mailbox, it’s gone. Deleted mailbox retention allows a mailbox to remain in the information store only if deleted mailbox retention was enabled prior to deleting the mailbox.

B. Restore the mailbox store from tape backup.

Correct

B. The only way to restore a deleted mailbox is from a backup. Some third-party utilities allow you to back up individual mailboxes, but no Microsoft utilities are available that do that.

C. Right-click the mailbox in Active Directory and select Reconnect.

Incorrect

C. Mailboxes don’t appear in Active Directory, user objects do. Exchange properties are properties of user objects.

D. In Active Directory Users and Computers, right-click the user and select Properties. Select the Exchange Features tab and connect to the mailbox store that contained the mailbox. Restore the deleted mailbox.

Incorrect

D. The Exchange Features tab contains settings for Instant Messaging and Voice Messaging.

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D

You’ve just created a user object for a new employee in Active Directory. You created an Exchange mailbox for him. A week later, you look at your list of mailboxes in the Exchange System MMC snap-in. You notice that his mailbox is in the first storage group, but you wanted his mailbox to be in the second storage group. How can you make the change?

A. Right-click the user object in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in and select Properties. On the Exchange General tab, move the user’s mailbox from the First Storage Group to the Second Storage Group, keeping his existing messages intact.

Incorrect

A. The Exchange General tab shows only the existing location of the user’s mailbox. No option exists to move it to another location.

B. Right-click the user object in Active Directory and select Delete Mailbox from the Exchange Tasks menu item. Then right-click the user object and select Create Mailbox from the Exchange Task menu item, this time providing the correct location.

Incorrect

B. By deleting the mailbox, you’ll be deleting the user’s mail.

C. Use the Exchange System MMC snap-in to access the mailbox’s properties. Move the mailbox from the First Storage Group to the Second Storage Group.

Incorrect

C. Exchange 2000 Server doesn’t have a directory service of its own. It relies on Active Directory. Therefore, you must make all directory changes by using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in.

D. Right-click the user object in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in and select Move Mailbox from the Exchange Tasks menu item.

Correct

D. The location of a user’s mailbox is a property of the Active Directory user object. By right-clicking the object in the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in, you’ll see the option Move Mailbox.

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A and B

You’re the Exchange administrator, and you’ve just deleted one of your employee’s user accounts by mistake. You want to restore the object as well as the user’s mail. You’re aware that Exchange 2000 Server supports deleted mailbox retention, so you attempt to restore the mailbox. What would you do to fully restore the user’s mail? (Choose all that apply.)

A. Recreate the user object in Active Directory Users and Computers without creating the mailbox. Right- click the mailbox in the Exchange System MMC snap-in and select Reconnect.

Correct

A. Deleted mailbox retention allows a mailbox to remain in the information store if the directory object has been deleted. After a user object is recreated, the mailbox can be reassociated with that user object.

B. Recreate the user object in Active Directory Users and Computers. Restore the mailbox store from tape backup.

Correct

B. Although this is an option, it isn’t necessary. Restoring a database can take hours. Recreating the user and reconnecting the mailbox can be accomplished in minutes.

C. Right-click the mailbox in Active Directory and select Reconnect.

Incorrect

C. Mailboxes don’t appear in Active Directory, user objects do. Exchange properties are properties of user objects.

D. In Active Directory Users and Computers, right-click the user and select Properties. Select the Exchange Features tab and connect to the mailbox store that contained the mailbox. Restore the deleted mailbox.

Incorrect

D. The Exchange Features tab contains settings for Instant Messaging and Voice Messaging.

3.3 Diagnose and resolve problems that involve user and information store placement.

In the second objective domain, we discussed how to create multiple mailbox stores and storage groups. In this objective, we’ll discuss how the physical and logical placement of the mailbox stores, storage groups, and transaction logs directly affects server performance, recoverability from disaster, and security. Proper placement of all these components should be determined during the planning phase of Exchange 2000 Server.

If you know your users’ messaging habits, you can determine the best physical location for mailboxes. By placing the mailboxes for all members of a department on the same mailbox store, for example, you’ll be taking optimum advantage of single instance messaging, thereby improving server performance. The logical location of your Exchange servers affects security by allowing for separate administration of Exchange servers by separate administrators. Administrative groups allow for decentralized administration, disregarding the physical location of Exchange servers. As always, carefully planning groups is so important.

You need to understand the purpose for creating multiple mailbox stores and storage groups. You need to understand the reason for selecting a correct location for transaction logs. You must also understand the proper use of administrative groups. If you need to move a user’s mailbox to a different database, you can do so by using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in. However, if you need to move a server to another Administrative group, you can’t do it by using the Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in. Can it be said enough? Planning! Planning! Planning!

This objective doesn’t cover the creation of storage groups. That was covered in Objective Domain 2. Nor does it cover the implementation of a disaster recovery plan. That’s covered in Objective Domain 6. However, this objective does consider solutions if these components aren’t deployed properly.

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A

You’re the messaging administrator, and you’ve been asked to make sure that your company’s CEO has her messaging data protected as much as possible. Quick restore time on her mailbox is required in the event of server failure. Which Exchange 2000 feature would you implement to accomplish this task?

A. Private mailbox store

Correct

A. Because of the ability to create multiple databases in Exchange 2000 Server, you can isolate one recipient’s mail on a separate database. This feature allows for faster restore because it’s restoring one mailbox, not the mailboxes of everyone in the company.

B. Separate Administrative group

Incorrect

B. You create Administrative groups in Exchange 2000 Server to delegate administrative authority over a set of Exchange 2000 servers. Creating Administrative groups won’t affect a restore process.

C. Individual mailbox backup

Incorrect

C. Exchange 2000 Server doesn’t provide for individual mailbox backups. To have this capability, a third- party application is required.

D. Deleted mailbox retention

Incorrect

D. Deleted mailbox retention won’t offer protection if the server fails. You use deleted item retention if an Active Directory mailbox-enabled object is deleted. The mailbox remains in the Exchange 2000 database for a configurable length of time. This allows the administrator time to recreate the user and reassociate the mailbox with the new user.

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B

Which method is used to move log files from C:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata to D:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata?

A. Run Performance Optimizer.

Incorrect

A. Although this was an option with Exchange Server 5.5, Exchange 2000 Server no longer has a Performance Optimizer utility.

B. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, go to the storage group properties and change the path of the transaction logs from C:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata to D:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata.

Correct

B. This is the correct way to move transaction logs.

C. Using Active Directory Users and Computers, go to the storage group properties and change the path of the transaction logs from C:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata to D:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata.

Incorrect

C. Storage groups are not objects created in Active Directory. They are files associated with the Exchange information store and are configured from within Exchange 2000 Server.

D. Using Windows Explorer, drag the transaction logs from C:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata and drop them in D:\Exchsrvr\Mdbdata.

Incorrect

D. This method of moving transaction logs doesn’t make necessary system updates. By using a drag-and- drop method to move transaction logs, you might have problems restarting the information store.

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B

Your company has three offices across the United States and one in France. Each location is responsible for administering and maintaining its own messaging environment. How should Exchange 2000 Server be installed?

A. Create multiple sites.

Incorrect

A. Sites are used to determine routing boundaries, not administrative boundaries.

B. Create multiple Administrative groups.

Correct

B. Administrative groups are created when you need to decentralize administration.

C. Create multiple storage groups.

Incorrect

C. Storage groups are a collection of databases and are contained within an Administrative group.

D. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, locate the object called First Administrative Group. In the list of servers, grant the appropriate rights to the administrator for the server he or she is required to administer.

Incorrect

D. To be able to fully administer an Exchange 2000 server, an administrator must have rights to the Administrative group. The only container objects under a server are the Protocols container and the Information Store container. The other containers under Administrative Groups that require an administrator’s rights include the Policies container, the Routing Groups container, the Chat Communities container, the Conferencing container, and the Folders container used to administer public folders.

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A, B, and C

You’re installing Exchange 2000 Server and you want to configure Outlook Web Access. You want to meet the following objectives:

  • Users should be able to log on using the same server name each time.
  • Users’ passwords should be encrypted.
  • Your Web Access Server should have fault tolerance.

You install Exchange 2000 Server using two front end servers and three back end servers. You configure DNS using a unified namespace for the front end servers and you enable SSL.

Which of the objectives will be met? (Choose all that apply.)

A. Your users can be configured to always log on using the same server name.

Correct

A. Front end/back end server architecture allows your users to be configured to log on using the same namespace every time, even when multiple servers exist.

B. You can require encrypted passwords.

Correct

B. Front end/back end server architecture allows for encrypted passwords by use of SSL.

C. Outlook Web Access will have fault tolerance.

Correct

C. By installing multiple Exchange 2000 servers as front end servers, you’ll eliminate a single point of failure.

D. None of the objectives will be met.

Incorrect

D. All the objectives are met.

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C

Your full backups are taking six hours and you want them to be complete in two hours. You don’t want to increase costs. How would you troubleshoot this problem?

A. Move the transaction logs to another disk.

Incorrect

A. Placing transaction logs on a separate disk improves performance and provides fault tolerance, but it doesn’t improve the backup time.

B. Create two additional mailbox stores in the first storage group.

Incorrect

B. Mailbox store databases in the same storage group can’t be backed up in parallel. By splitting your users into three mailbox stores, your backup times won’t be improved.

C. Create two additional storage groups.

Correct

C. By splitting your users into three storage groups, you’ll be able to run three backups in parallel and thereby reduce the backup process to the required time.

D. Install two additional Exchange 2000 servers.

Incorrect

D. Although this solution will allow you to run your backups in parallel, it will incur more cost and overhead.

3.4 Create and manage address lists.

The ultimate goal of any messaging system is to be fast, efficient, and at the same time, simple for the recipients to use. As an administrator, you can simplify the way your users find addresses by grouping them together in a variety of ways. When your users want to send messages to other individuals but have difficulty navigating through a large Global Address List (GAL), you can break that list into smaller, more customized address lists. This objective will familiarize you with the three types of address lists. Default address lists are already built in when Exchange 2000 Server is first installed. Custom address lists are configured by the administrator. Offline address lists are for users to have available when working away from the office. For this objective, you must understand each of these groups and know how to create them.

Another type of group is a mail-enabled group of users created for bulk mailings. Your options include distribution groups, used solely for the purpose of grouping for bulk mail, and security groups, used for bulk mail and for network resource access. Both of these groups can be one of three types: global, domain local, and universal. Read the section in Chapter 4 of the Microsoft Exchange 2000 Resource Kit mentioned in the "Further Reading" section for good descriptions of each, as well as sample scenarios for using each.

Groups are a useful tool, but, once again, planning is so important. Don’t forget the importance that Global Catalog servers have on your lists. To succeed on this portion of the exam, a little lab can go a long way.

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A and D

Your Microsoft Windows 2000 network is configured as a single domain. Your users frequently send messages to other people within their own department. You want to group users according to their departments and at the same time, you want to take advantage of single instance messaging. What can you create for your users to help them with their bulk mail? (Choose all that apply.)

A. Using Active Directory Users and Computers, create one security group for each department.

Correct

A. Active Directory Users and Computers is the correct tool to use to create the group. You’ll have the option to create your group as either a security group or a distribution group.

B. Using Active Directory Users and Computers, create one custom address list for each department.

Incorrect

B. To create a custom address list, you’ll need to use the Exchange System MMC snap-in. A custom address list isn’t an Active Directory object that will provide for single instance messaging. It simply groups Active Directory objects into a view within Outlook. This allows users to see individual recipient accounts grouped together—in this case, by department.

C. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, create one security group for each department.

Incorrect

C. Active Directory Users and Computers is the correct tool to use to create the group, not the Exchange System MMC snap-in.

D. Using Active Directory Users and Computers, create one universal group for each department.

Correct

D. Active Directory Users and Computers is the correct tool to use to create the group. By using a group for bulk mail, Exchange 2000 Server will create one message for each required mailbox store.

E. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, create one universal group for each department.

Incorrect

E. Active Directory Users and Computers is the correct tool to use to create the group, not the Exchange System MMC snap-in.

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B and D

You created a domain local distribution group and want to change the scope. You’re in native mode. What are your options? (Choose all that apply.)

A. Global distribution group

Incorrect

A. It isn’t possible to change a domain local group into a global group.

B. Universal distribution group

Correct

B. It is possible to change a domain local distribution group into a universal distribution group, as long as the domain local group doesn’t contain another domain local group.

C. Global security group

Incorrect

C. It isn’t possible to convert a domain local distribution group into either type of global group.

D. Universal security group

Correct

D. It is possible to change a domain local distribution group into a universal security group, as long as the domain local group doesn’t contain another domain local group.

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A, B, and D

You’re the messaging administrator for a native-mode company with multiple domains. Currently, your company is experiencing quite a bit of growth and has been hiring 25 new employees per week. You’re researching ways to streamline your system through use of address lists and groups. Your goals are the following:

  • To set up bulk mail
  • To create a mailing group that can be used companywide
  • To keep system overhead to a minimum
  • To use this group to assign access to public folders
  • To maintain the flexibility to change the group scope, if needed, after the group has been created.

Solution: You create a universal group and include all company employees in the group.

Which goals are accomplished? (Choose all that apply.)

A. To set up bulk mail

Correct

A. A universal group can be mail enabled to allow for bulk mail.

B. To create a mailing group that can be used companywide

Correct

B. A universal group can include all users from all domains.

C. To keep system overhead to a minimum

Incorrect

C. Because membership changes are replicated to all Global Catalogs, and because you’ll need to update membership regularly, using universal groups will incur a high amount of replication overhead.

D. To use this group to assign access to public folders

Correct

D. It’s possible to create universal security groups provided you are in native mode. It isn’t possible to create universal security groups while in mixed mode.

E. To maintain the flexibility to change the group scope, if needed, after the group has been created

Incorrect

E. Unlike local and global groups, the group scope of a universal group can’t be changed.

F. This solution doesn’t accomplish any of the goals

Incorrect

F. This solution meets the first two goals and the fourth goal.

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C

When creating a customized address list, you must filter which three objects to populate the list?

A. Custom Attribute, Condition, and Value

Incorrect

A. The correct answer to this question is Field, Condition, and Value. Custom Attribute is a choice for the Field option.

B. Users, Groups, and Contacts

Incorrect

B. These are the selections for defining the scope of the search for the creation of the address list. The default is to search all Exchange 2000 recipients, but that parameter can be modified.

C. Field, Condition, and Value

Correct

C. Field is the object the Recipient Update Service searches to build a list, for example, Department. Condition is the object that defines the search parameter, for example, Is Exactly. Value is the description of which entry the service is looking for in the selected field, for example, Human Resources.

D. Exchange Recipients, Computer, and Organizational Unit

Incorrect

D. These options are for defining the scope of the search. The default is to include all Exchange recipients that meet the filter criteria. You can limit the search to include objects only on this computer or only in this organizational unit.

3.5 Diagnose and resolve Recipient Update Service problems.

Creating address lists for your users will be beneficial to them. A working knowledge of the service that keeps your lists updated will be beneficial to you when you’re required to troubleshoot. The Recipient Update Service (RUS) is a subservice of the Exchange 2000 System Attendant and relies on the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) to search Active Directory for changes to recipients. There is one enterprisewide instance of the service used to keep the addresses of configuration objects current. Examples of this object type include the Exchange Information Store object, the MTA object, and the System Attendant service. In addition, there is one instance of the service for each domain, which is used to update recipient information.

Here’s how it works: the RUS is located in the Recipients container in the Exchange System MMC snap-in. The service is configured to show which Exchange 2000 server the service is running on, which domain controller the service will check for updates, and how often the domain controller will be polled. The default is every minute. When changes are detected, the address lists are updated. If a recipient has been marked as hidden, the Recipient object is flagged as such and won’t be visible in any of the address lists. The RUS is responsible to update all address lists, built-in as well as custom.

If a domain is running an older version of Exchange Server, you must use the Exchange 2000 Server installation CD-ROM to run DomainPrep in the domain without Exchange 2000 Server. After the schema has been updated, install an instance of the RUS on an Exchange 2000 server in another domain. You can install multiple instances of the service. The limitation is that no two services can point to the same domain controller. Once complete, your updates will be backward compatible.

Don’t underestimate the importance of the RUS. When users create their Outlook profiles, they’re required to provide the name of their Exchange 2000 server and their alias name. Address lists are used to perform name resolution. If a user isn’t visible in an address list, that user won’t be able to access mail.

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D

You create a mailbox that will be used to receive system messages. You don’t want other users to send mail to this mailbox, so you hide it from the GAL. You want to log on as that recipient but when you try to open Outlook, you can’t. How would you troubleshoot this problem?

A. Delete the user object from Active Directory, recreate the user object in Active Directory, and reassociate the mailbox to the user account.

Incorrect

A. This is the procedure used if a user object is inadvertently deleted. This isn’t the solution for the problem at hand.

B. Create an additional RUS for your domain.

Incorrect

B. You must have one, and only one, RUS per domain.

C. Move the RUS from the existing domain controller to a domain controller located within the domain that’s handling all instances of the RUS.

Incorrect

C. You should configure the RUS on a domain controller located within the domain that it will service.

D. Make the recipient object visible, log on as the user, and then hide the mailbox again.

Correct

D. Outlook uses address lists for name resolution. If a recipient is hidden from all address lists, name resolution won’t occur. You must clear the check box that hides the recipient from the Exchange address lists the first time the mailbox is accessed. Once name resolution has occurred and the profile has been created, it’s okay to leave the object hidden.

MCS

70-224.03.05.002

C

How can you force an address list update?

A. Using the Exchange System MMC snap-in, right-click the address list service for your domain and select Update Now.

Incorrect

A. The Exchange System MMC snap-in isn’t used for this task; the Active Directory Sites and Services MMC snap-in is the correct MMC snap-in to use.

B. Using Active Directory Users and Computers, right-click the address list service for your domain and select Update Now.

Incorrect

B. The Active Directory Users and Computers MMC snap-in isn’t the utility used for this task; the Active Directory Sites and Services MMC snap-in is the correct MMC snap-in to use.

Correct

C. The Active Directory Sites and Services MMC snap-in is the correct snap-in to use for this task.

D. Using the Services MMC snap-in, right-click the address list service for your domain and select Update Now.

Incorrect

D. The Services MMC snap-in isn’t used for this task; the Active Directory Sites and Services MMC snap-in is the correct snap-in to use.

MCS

70-224.03.05.003

A

You have one domain still running Exchange Server 5.5. You’ve run DomainPrep, but that server still isn’t receiving address updates. How would you troubleshoot this problem?

A. Install the RUS for that domain using a different domain controller than the one you’re using for the service in the local domain.

Correct

A. You must have the RUS for every domain, but there can be only one instance per domain controller.

B. Install the RUS for that domain using the same domain controller as the one you’re using for the service in the local domain.

Incorrect

B. There can be only one instance of the RUS per domain controller.

C. Install an instance of the RUS on the server running Exchange Server 5.5. Once installed, open Control Panel and stop and restart the service.

Incorrect

C. This service can’t be installed on a non-Exchange 2000 server.

D. It isn’t possible to use RUS to update an Exchange 5.5 address list.

Incorrect

D. It is possible to use this service for an Exchange 5.5 server. The requirement is that it must run on a domain controller not currently running the service for an Exchange 2000 server.

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