MCSE: Microsoft Windows 2000 Accelerated Training Kit

MCSE: Microsoft Windows 2000 Accelerated Training Kit

by Microsoft Press
     
 

This official MCSE Training Kit teaches IT professionals certified on Microsoft Windows NT "RM" 4.0 how to extend their knowledge to Windows 2000 — including getting ready for Exam 70-240, a special accelerated exam on the new MCSE certification track. For a limited time, MCSEs who've earned their credentials on Windows NT 4.0 have the option of

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Overview

This official MCSE Training Kit teaches IT professionals certified on Microsoft Windows NT "RM" 4.0 how to extend their knowledge to Windows 2000 — including getting ready for Exam 70-240, a special accelerated exam on the new MCSE certification track. For a limited time, MCSEs who've earned their credentials on Windows NT 4.0 have the option of passing Exam 70-240 instead of four of the core requirements on the Windows 2000 track. Topics map directly to the objectives measured by Exams 70-210, 70-215, 70-216, and 70-217 — including installing, configuring, and administering Windows 2000 Professional in a desktop environment; installing and configuring Windows 2000 Server in an Active Directory "TM" environment; implementing and administering a Windows 2000 network infrastructure; and installing, configuring, and troubleshooting Active Directory. Students learn through an integrated system of skill-building tutorials, case study examples, and self-assessment exercises. An economical alternative to classroom instruction, this kit enables students to set their own pace and learn by doing!

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This self-paced official Microsoft study guide pools the most relevant lessons from the study guides for core MCSE exams 70-210 (Windows 2000 Professional), 70-215 (Windows 2000 Server) 70-216 (Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure Administration) and 70-217 (Windows 2000 Active Directory Services). It focuses on the skills and knowledge that Microsoft Windows NT-certified professionals need to successfully transition to Windows 2000. The included CD-ROM contains the entire course. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735612495
Publisher:
Microsoft Press
Publication date:
01/01/2000
Series:
MCSE Training Kits Series
Pages:
1546
Product dimensions:
7.73(w) x 9.33(h) x 3.04(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 2 Managing Hardware Devices and Drivers

Lesson 1 Installing Hardware Automatically   69

Lesson 2 Installing Hardware Manually   73

Lesson 3 Configuring the Display   78

Lesson 4 Installing, Managing, and Troubleshooting    Other Devices   84

Lesson 5 Introducing the Microsoft Management Console   89

Lesson 6 Using Consoles   95

Lesson 7 Introducing Disk Management   103

Lesson 8 Common Disk Management Tasks   110

Lesson 9 Managing Disk Quotas   125

Lesson 10 Configuring Power Options   135

Lesson 11 Using Device Manager and System Information   139

Lesson 12 Monitoring System Performance   147

Review   150

About This Chapter

With Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional, all aspects of installing, configuring, and managing hardware devices and their associated drivers are improved over previous versions of Windows. Plug and Play hardware is supported and non–Plug and Play devices can be easily installed and configured.

As the various devices are installed and configured, Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional stores this information in two locations: the registry and the directory services based on Active Directory technology. Modifications to the registry or Active Directory directory services change the configuration of the Windows 2000 environment. You use the following tools to modify the registry or Active Directory directory services:

  • Microsoft Management Console
  • Device Manager
  • Control Panel
  • Registry Editor

As a Windows NT 4 professional, you should already be familiar with using the Control Panel and Registry Editor. This chapter begins with a discussion of the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) and how it is used to manage and monitor hardware. You will have the opportunity to use the MMC in the various exercises presented throughout this chapter The hardware topics discussed include:

  • Disk management
  • Power management
  • Monitoring hardware performance

The chapter concludes with an overview of using the Performance Console to monitor system performance.

Before You Begin

To complete this chapter, you must have

  • A computer that meets the minimum hardware requirements listed in "Hardware Requirements," in "About This Book."
  • The Windows 2000 Professional software installed on the computer

Lesson 1: Installing Hardware Automatically

Windows 2000 Professional supports both Plug and Play and non–Plug and Play hardware. This lesson introduces you to the automatic hardware installation features of Windows 2000 Professional.

After this lesson, you will be able to

  • Describe how to install hardware automatically

Estimated lesson time: 15 minutes

Installing Plug and Play Hardware

With most Plug and Play hardware, you simply connect the device to the computer, and Windows 2000 Professional automatically configures the new settings. However, you might occasionally need to initiate automatic installation for some Plug and Play hardware. You do this with the Add/Remove Hardware wizard.

Installing Non–Plug and Play Hardware

For non–Plug and Play hardware, Windows 2000 Professional often identifies the hardware and automatically installs and configures it. For non–Plug and Play hardware that Windows 2000 Professional doesn’t identify, install, and configure, you initiate the automatic installation of the hardware with the Add/Remove Hardware wizard.

Follow these steps for automatic hardware installations:

  1. Initiate automatic hardware installation by starting the Add/Remove Hardware wizard.
  2. Windows 2000 Professional queries the hardware about the hardware resources that it requires and the settings needed for those resources. A hardware resource allows a hardware device to communicate directly with the operating system. Windows 2000 Professional can resolve conflicts between different Plug and Play hardware devices for hardware resources.

  3. Confirm the automatic hardware installation.
  4. Once Windows 2000 Professional finishes the installation, verify correct installation and configure the hardware.

Using the Add/Remove Hardware Wizard

You use the Add/Remove Hardware wizard to initiate automatic hardware installation and to troubleshoot devices. You also use the wizard to install undetected hardware devices—both Plug and Play devices and non–Plug and Play devices.

Follow these steps to begin installing new hardware using the Add/Remove Hardware wizard:

  1. In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Hardware Wizard.
  2. Click Next to close the welcome page.
  3. Select Add/Troubleshoot A Device, and then click Next.
  4. Windows searches for new devices.

After the Add/Remove Hardware wizard starts, it searches for new Plug and Play hardware and then proceeds to install any devices it finds. If the wizard finds no new devices, it displays the Choose A Hardware Device page, shown in Figure 2.1. If no new hardware devices are detected, Windows 2000 Professional prompts you to select one of the installed devices to troubleshoot it.


Click to view graphic

Figure 2.1 Troubleshooting with the Add/Remove Hardware wizard

Confirming Hardware Installation

After installing hardware, follow these steps to confirm the installation using Device Manager:

  1. Double-click the System icon in Control Panel.
  2. Click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
  3. This allows you to view the installed hardware, as shown in Figure 2.2.

Windows 2000 Professional uses icons in the right pane of the Computer Management window to identify each installed hardware device. If Windows 2000 Professional doesn’t have an icon for the device type, it displays a question mark.


Click to view graphic

Figure 2.2 The Device Manager window showing devices listed by type

Expand the device tree to locate the newly installed hardware device. The device icon indicates whether the hardware device is operating properly. You can use the information in Table 2.1 to determine the hardware status.

Table 2.1 Device Manager Hardware Status

IconHardware status
Normal iconHardware is operating properly.
Stop sign on iconWindows 2000 Professional disabled the hardware device because of hardware conflicts. To correct this, right-click the device icon, and then click Properties. Set the hardware resources manually according to what is available on the system.
Exclamation point on icon The hardware device is incorrectly configured or its drivers are missing

Lesson Summary

In this lesson, you learned that Windows 2000 Professional supports both Plug and Play and non–Plug and Play hardware. With most Plug and Play hardware, you connect the device to the computer, and Windows 2000 Professional automatically configures the new settings. For non–Plug and Play hardware, Windows 2000 Professional often identifies the hardware and automatically installs and configures it. For Plug and Play hardware devices and non–Plug and Play hardware that Windows 2000 Professional doesn’t identify, install, and configure, you must initiate automatic hardware installation with the Add/Remove Hardware wizard.

Lesson 2: Installing Hardware Manually

Occasionally, Windows 2000 Professional fails to automatically detect a hardware device. When this occurs, you must manually install the hardware device. You might also have to manually install a hardware device if the device requires a specific hardware resource. You manually install these devices to ensure that they have the necessary resources.

To manually install hardware, you must do the following:

  • Determine which hardware resource the hardware device requires.
  • Determine the available hardware resources.
  • Change hardware resource assignments.

After this lesson, you will be able to

  • Install hardware manually
  • Determine hardware resource need and availability
  • Reassign hardware resources

Estimated lesson time: 10 minutes

Determining Which Hardware Resources Are Required

When installing new hardware, you need to know which available resources in Windows 2000 Professional the hardware can use. You can refer to the product documentation to determine what resources a hardware device requires. Table 2.2 describes the resources that hardware devices use to communicate with an operating system.

Table 2.2 Hardware Device Resources

ResourceDescription
InterruptsHardware devices use interrupts to send messages. The microprocessor knows this as an interrupt request (IRQ). The microprocessor uses this information to determine which device needs its attention and the type of attention that it needs. Windows 2000 Professional provides 16 IRQs, numbered 0 to 15, which are assigned to devices; for example, Windows 2000 Professional assigns IRQ 1 to the keyboard.
Input/output
I/O ports
I/O ports are a section of memory that a hardware device uses to communicate with the operating system. When a microprocessor receives an IRQ, the operating system checks the I/O port address to retrieve additional information about what the hardware device wants it to do. An I/O port is represented as a hexadecimal number.
Direct memory
access (DMA) channels
DMA channels allow a hardware device, such as a floppy disk drive, to access memory directly, without interrupting the microprocessor. DMA channels speed up access to memory.Windows 2000 Professional has eight DMA channels, numbered 0 to 7.
MemoryMany hardware devices, such as a network adapter card (NAC), use onboard memory or reserve system memory. This reserved memory is unavailable for use by other devices or Windows 2000 Professional.

Determining Available Hardware Resources

After you determine which resources a hardware device requires, you can look for an available resource. Device Manager provides a list of all hardware resources and their availability, as shown in Figure 2.3.


Click to view graphic

Figure 2.3 The Device Manager window showing resources listed by connection

Follow these steps to view the hardware resources lists:

  1. From the System Properties dialog box, click the Hardware tab, and then click Device Manager.
  2. On the View menu, click Resources By Connection.
  3. Device Manager displays the resources that are currently in use (for example, IRQs).

  4. To view a list of resources for another type of hardware resource, on the View menu, click the type of hardware resource that you want to see.

Once you know which hardware resources are available, you can install the hardware manually with the Add/Remove Hardware wizard.


NOTE:
If you select a hardware resource during manual installation, you might need to configure the hardware device so that it can use the resource. For example, for a network adapter to use IRQ 5, you might have to set a jumper on the adapter and configure Windows 2000 Professional so that it recognizes that the adapter now uses IRQ 5.

Changing Hardware Resource Assignments

You might need to change hardware resource assignments. For example, a hardware device might require a specific resource presently in use by another device. You might also encounter a conflict that is the result of two hardware devices requesting the same hardware resource.

To change a resource setting, use the Resources tab in the device’s Properties dialog box.

Follow these steps to access the Resources tab:

  1. From the Hardware tab of the System Properties dialog box, click Device Manager.
  2. Expand the device list, right-click the specific device, and then click Properties.
  3. In the Properties dialog box for the device, click the Resources tab.


TIP:
When you change a hardware resource, print the content of Device Manager. This will provide you with a record of the hardware configuration. If you encounter problems, you can use the printout to verify the hardware resource assignments.

From this point on, follow the same procedures that you used to choose a hardware resource during a manual installation.


NOTE:
Changing the resource assignments for non–Plug and Play devices in Device Manager doesn’t change the resources used by that device. You use Device Manager only to set device configuration for the operating system. To change the resources used by a non–Plug and Play device, consult the device documentation to see whether switches or jumpers must be configured on the device.

Lesson Summary

In this lesson, you learned about installing hardware manually. If Windows 2000 Professional fails to automatically detect a hardware device, or if a hardware device requires a specific hardware resource, you might have to manually install these devices. When you manually install hardware, you must determine any resources required by that hardware device. Hardware resources include interrupts, I/O ports, and memory. Refer to the product documentation to determine what resources a device requires. You also must determine which of the appropriate hardware resources are available on Windows 2000 Professional. The Device Manager snap-in provides a list of all hardware resources and their availability on Windows 2000 Professional.

You also learned that you might need to change hardware resource assignments. For example, a hardware device might require a specific resource presently in use by another device. You saw that to change a hardware resource, you also use Device Manager.

Lesson 3: Configuring the Display

One of the more common tasks of hardware configuration is setting the display properties to meet the desires of the users. Users with permission to load and unload device drivers can also install and test video drivers. Windows 2000 Professional can change video resolutions dynamically without restarting the system.

After this lesson, you will be able to

  • Use Control Panel to configure the display

Estimated lesson time: 25 minutes

Setting Display Properties

To view or modify the display properties, in Control Panel, double-click the Display icon, and then click the Settings tab (see Figure 2.4). Alternatively, right-click your desktop and select Properties from the shortcut menu. Configurable display options include the number of colors, video resolution, font size, and refresh frequency.


Click to view graphic

Figure 2.4 The Settings tab of the Display Properties dialog box

Table 2.3 describes the options available on the Settings tab for configuring the display settings.

Table 2.3 Settings Tab Options for Configuring the Display

Option Description
ColorsLists color depths for the display adapter
Screen AreaAllows you to set the resolution for the display adapter
TroubleshootOpens the Display Troubleshooter to aid in diagnosing display problems
AdvancedOpens the Properties dialog box for the display adapter, as described in Table 2.4.

If the basic settings are not sufficient to configure your monitor, you can used the more detailed settings under the Advanced tab. Table 2.4 describes the display adapter options....

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Meet the Author


Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq `MSFT') is the worldwide leader in software for personal and business computing. The company offers a wide range of products and services designed to empower people through great software--any time, any place, and on any device.

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