MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 by Microsoft Press, Jill Spealman, Microsoft Corporation |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0

MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0

by Microsoft Press, Jill Spealman, Microsoft Corporation
     
 

The Microsoft Readiness Reviews series helps people determine if they're ready for the real Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) exam by identifying strengths and weaknesses, and providing information on areas for improvement. "MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Windows NT 4.0 Workstation" measures abilities to plan for, implement, administer and

Overview

The Microsoft Readiness Reviews series helps people determine if they're ready for the real Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) exam by identifying strengths and weaknesses, and providing information on areas for improvement. "MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Windows NT 4.0 Workstation" measures abilities to plan for, implement, administer and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate the high-performance desktop operating system. Skills that are assessed include installation and configuration, managing resources, connectivity, and monitoring and optimization. A test delivery engine on CD covers exam objectives by randomly providing dozens of sample questions from a pool of hundreds more, so students can retest themselves with different questions. And all responses both right and wrong result in helpful explanations. A companion book features test preparation suggestions and a list of all questions included in the Readiness Review exam.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780735605374
Publisher:
Microsoft Press
Publication date:
11/19/1998
Series:
MCSE Series
Pages:
350
Product dimensions:
7.32(w) x 8.93(h) x 1.28(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 7
Troubleshooting

  • Objective Domain 7: Troubleshooting
      • Tested Skills and Suggested Practices
  • Objective 7.5: Choose the appropriate course of action to take when a user cannot access a resource.
    • Permissions Checklist
      • Key Terms
      • Further Reading

Objective Domain 7: Troubleshooting

The Troubleshooting domain covers problem resolution for various areas in Windows NT Workstation using a variety of tools. The problems and troubleshooting options discussed are:

ProblemTroubleshooting options
Boot process failureUse the emergency repair process.
Use the Last Known Good Configuration option.
Print job failureControl the printer using the Printer folder.
Use resources such as the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit or the Windows NT Server Reference Guide to determine problems and tests.
Installation failureUse references to determine problems and tests.
Application failureCheck STATUS messages.
Use Event Viewer.
User access failureUse the permissions checklist in this chapter.
Use troubleshooting tools for Remote Access Service.

This domain also covers the following advanced troubleshooting tools:

ToolDescription
RegistryTool used to edit system configuration via remote access.
Memory dump fileTool used to create a file for analysis by technical support.

Tested Skills and Suggested Practices

  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when the boot process fails. You must be able to distinguish between a missing or corrupted boot file and an incorrect configuration, and use the appropriate tools for recovery.
    • Practice 1: Learn the steps in the boot process. Recognize the files needed for booting in your operating system and their functions.
    • Practice 2: Determine when to use the emergency repair process. Learn to recognize the common boot process error messages. Read about the procedure and materials necessary for restoring missing or corrupted boot files.
    • Practice 3: Determine when to use the Last Known Good Configuration option. Learn to recognize the symptoms of an incorrect configuration. Read about the procedure for using the Last Known Good Configuration option.

  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when a print job fails. You must be able to resolve local and network printing problems.
    • Practice 1: Control a print job from the Printers folder. Use the Printer menu to pause printing on a printer and purge documents. Use the Document menu to pause, resume, and restart a print job.
    • Practice 2: Learn the seven processes involved in a network printing job. Using references, familiarize yourself with the symptoms and tests for each process. Using resources such as the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit or the Windows NT Server Resource Guide, view the series of troubleshooting steps for printing.

  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when the installation process fails. You must be able to resolve installation process problems.
    • Practice 1: Learn the installation process. Using references, familiarize yourself with the typical problems encountered while installing Windows NT Workstation and their solutions.

  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when an application fails. You must be able to resolve application problems.
    • Practice 1: Learn the symptoms of an application failure. Read about the three types of STATUS messages that detect conditions in an application. Familiarize yourself with the various STATUS messages.
    • Practice 2: Use the Event Viewer to view events for an application. View detail for an event. Familiarize yourself with the Message Database help file on the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit CD.

  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when a user cannot access a resource. You must be able to resolve resource access problems.
    • Practice 1: Distinguish between share permissions and NT File System (NTFS) permissions. Analyze how each type of permission affects users, groups, folders, and files using the Permissions Checklist. Learn how combining share permissions and NTFS permissions can secure resources. Learn how moving and copying folders and files within or between NTFS and file allocation table (FAT) file systems affects permissions.
    • Practice 2: Identify troubleshooting tools for Remote Access Service (RAS). Determine which tool to use in a given situation.

  • Modifying the Registry using the appropriate tool in a given situation. You must be able to resolve basic configuration problems using the Registry Editor.
    • Practice 1: Familiarize yourself with Registry tools. Distinguish between the capabilities of REGEDT32 and REGEDIT. Learn which Registry-management tools are provided with Windows NT. Learn which Registry-management tools are provided on the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit CD.
    • Practice 2: Learn the Registry structure. Know the five subkeys and the areas they control. Determine which subkey to modify in a given situation.

  • Implementing advanced techniques to resolve various problems. You must be able to create a memory dump file for use in system troubleshooting.
    • Practice 1: Learn the procedure for creating a memory dump file. Learn the three utilities for processing memory dump files. Know which utility to use in a given situation.

Objective 7.5: Choose the appropriate course of action to take when a user cannot access a resource.

Typically, users cannot access a resource because of inadequate access permissions. The following permissions checklist is a list of items to consider when troubleshooting a situation that involves access and permissions:

Permissions Checklist

  • What is the permission assigned to the user? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • To which group(s) is the user assigned? What is the permission assigned to the group(s)? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • What is the permission assigned to the folder? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • What is the permission assigned to the file? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • What rules for combining share permissions and NTFS permissions apply to this situation?
  • Is the resource you want to access on a FAT or an NTFS partition?
  • Have files or folders recently been copied or moved within NTFS volumes or between NTFS or FAT volumes? How has this move affected the permissions on the files or folders?

If you have problems with Remote Access Service (RAS) access, you can use the following tools:

  • Event Viewer—Used to view RAS events in the system log.
  • Dial-up Networking Monitor—Used to show the status of a session in progress, including the duration of the call, amount of data being transmitted and received, number of errors, and lines being used for Multilink sessions.
  • PPP.LOG file—Can be created to provide debugging information for PPP connections.
  • Authentication settings—Used to provide a range of encryption levels. Authentication settings can be set low to start and increased to the highest level that can be used successfully between two systems.

Questions related to this objective are designed to determine if you have an awareness of these issues. To successfully answer the questions for this objective, you need a firm understanding of several key terms. For definitions of these terms, refer to the Glossary in this book.

Key Terms

  • Access token
  • Dial-Up Networking
  • Multilink Protocol (MP)
  • NTFS permissions
  • Permissions
  • Remote Access Service (RAS)
  • Share permissions

70-073.07.05.001

A user on a Windows NT Workstation client computer has No Access permissions to a shared folder on a Windows NT server. She needs Read and Change permissions to the folder. The permissions were granted directly to the user’s Windows NT user account, but she is still not able to access the folder.

What should you do to solve this problem?

  1. Grant the user ownership of the share.
  2. Have the user log off and then back on.
  3. Map a drive to the share using the UNC path.
  4. Make sure NetBEUI is configured on the client computer.

70-073.07.05.002

An application directory was moved from one NTFS partition to another NTFS partition on the same Windows NT Server. Users that were able to access the application directory before the move are not able to access it now.

What should you do first to solve this problem?

  1. Check for inherited permissions.
  2. Have users log off and then back on.
  3. Map a network drive to the new location.
  4. Make sure there is adequate free disk space at the new location.

70-073.07.05.001

A user on a Windows NT Workstation client computer has No Access permissions to a shared folder on a Windows NT server. She needs Read and Change permissions to the folder. The permissions were granted directly to the user’s Windows NT user account, but she is still not able to access the folder.

What should you do to solve this problem?

Correct Answer: B

  1. Incorrect: Granting ownership of the share will allow the user to share the folder or assign permissions to the folder, which is not necessary.
  2. Correct: Since the permissions were granted directly to the user’s account, the user must log off and log back on for the permissions to take effect. An access token that contains permissions information is created for a user every time he logs on. To update the access token, a user must log off and log on again; a remote user must disconnect and then reconnect.
  3. Incorrect: Mapping a drive to the shared folder will not provide access to the folder. In order to map a drive, you must first have the appropriate permission.
  4. Incorrect: NetBEUI is a protocol and will not affect the permission assigned for the shared folder.

70-073.07.05.002

An application directory was moved from one NTFS partition to another NTFS partition on the same Windows NT Server. Users that were able to access the application directory before the move are not able to access it now.

What should you do first to solve this problem?

Correct Answer: A

  1. Correct: Since the directory was moved to another NTFS partition, the directory has inherited the permissions of the destination folder. By changing the permissions on the destination folder, you can restore access to the users.
  2. Incorrect: Since the user’s permissions were not changed, logging off and then logging back on is not necessary.
  3. Incorrect: Mapping a drive to the application directory will not provide access to the directory. In order to map a drive, you must first have the appropriate permission.
  4. Incorrect: There is no indication that users are encountering a memory problem; adding free disk space will not solve a permission problem.

70-073.07.05.003

Your computer running Windows NT Workstation has two modems. You are having trouble establishing a RAS session to a remote server using the PPP Multilink Protocol (MP). Each time you attempt to dial the RAS server, the session lasts only a few seconds before disconnecting.

The required result is to monitor the status of a dial-up networking session that is in progress.

The first optional result is to monitor the number of errors occurring during the dial-up networking session. The second optional result is to determine which lines are being used for Multilink sessions.

The proposed solution is to attempt the RAS session again, and view the connection status using Dial-Up Networking Monitor.

What does the proposed solution provide?

  1. The required result and all optional results.
  2. The required result and one optional result.
  3. The required result but none of the optional results.
  4. The proposed solution does not provide the required result.

70-073.07.05.004

You need to grant Read and Write access to a user on a file located in the shared folder \MKTG. You assign the Read and Write NTFS permissions to this file. The user complains that he still cannot save changes to that file. He has already logged off and back on again and still has the problem.

Which condition could be the cause of the problem?

  1. The NTFS permission on the \MKTG folder is set to Read Only.
  2. The NTFS permission on the \MKTG folder is set to Read, Write, and Execute.
  3. The user is not a member of the Everyone group which has Full Control permissions on this folder.
  4. The user is a member of the Everyone group, which has Full Control permissions on the \MKTG folder.

70-073.07.05.003

Your computer running Windows NT Workstation has two modems. You are having trouble establishing a RAS session to a remote server using the PPP Multilink Protocol (MP). Each time you attempt to dial the RAS server, the session lasts only a few seconds before disconnecting.

The required result is to monitor the status of a dial-up networking session that is in progress.

The first optional result is to monitor the number of errors occurring during the dial-up networking session. The second optional result is to determine which lines are being used for Multilink sessions.

The proposed solution is to attempt the RAS session again, and view the connection status using Dial-Up Networking Monitor.

What does the proposed solution provide?

Correct Answer: A

  1. Correct: The Dial-Up Networking Monitor is used to troubleshoot RAS, and monitors the status of a dial-up networking session in progress. In addition, the Dial-Up Networking Monitor provides the number of errors that occur during the dial-up session and can also show which lines are used for Multilink sessions.
  2. Incorrect: See the explanation for answer A.
  3. Incorrect: See the explanation for answer A.
  4. Incorrect: See the explanation for answer A.

70-073.07.05.004

You need to grant Read and Write access to a user on a file located in the shared folder \MKTG. You assign the Read and Write NTFS permissions to this file. The user complains that he still cannot save changes to that file. He has already logged off and back on again and still has the problem.

Which condition could be the cause of the problem?

Correct Answer: A

  1. Correct: You provided Read and Write NTFS permissions to the user for the file. The NTFS permission for the /MKTG folder is Read, which prohibits the user from accessing the file. Set the share permission for the /MKTG folder to Change and the user will be able to save changes to the file.
  2. Incorrect: If the NTFS permission for the \MKTG folder is Read, Write, and Execute, the user would be able to save changes to the file.
  3. Incorrect: Being a member of the Everyone group, which has Full Control, has no effect on the NTFS permissions set for the /MKTG folder or for the file within the folder.
  4. Incorrect: Being a member of the Everyone group, which has Full Control, has no effect on the NTFS permissions set for the /MKTG folder or for the file within the folder.

Further Reading

The Microsoft Windows NT Network Administration volume of the Microsoft Windows NT Network Administration Training kit Chapter 6, Lesson 2 provides details on combining share permissions and NTFS permissions and includes a short video and exercises explaining how the two types of permissions work together. Lesson 7 provides information on troubleshooting permission-related problems. Practice for troubleshooting permission problems is included on the CD provided with this kit.
The Microsoft Windows NT Technical Support volume of the Microsoft Windows NT Technical Support Training kit Chapter 12, Lesson 5 provides information on troubleshooting Remote Access Service.
Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Study Guide. Osborne McGraw-Hill, Berkeley, CA, 1998. ISBN 0-07-882492-3. Chapter 6 contains detailed information on access tokens, file and directory security using NTFS, share permissions, and moving and copying files and folders. There is also a discussion of using share permissions with NTFS permissions.

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