MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0

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The Microsoft Readiness Reviews series helps people determine if they're ready for the real Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) exam by identifying strengths and weaknesses, and providing information on areas for improvement. ""MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Windows NT 4.0 Workstation"" measures abilities to plan for, implement, administer and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate the high-performance desktop operating system. Skills that are assessed include installation and configuration,...
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Overview


The Microsoft Readiness Reviews series helps people determine if they're ready for the real Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) exam by identifying strengths and weaknesses, and providing information on areas for improvement. ""MCSE Readiness Review Exam 70-073 Windows NT 4.0 Workstation"" measures abilities to plan for, implement, administer and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate the high-performance desktop operating system. Skills that are assessed include installation and configuration, managing resources, connectivity, and monitoring and optimization. A test delivery engine on CD covers exam objectives by randomly providing dozens of sample questions from a pool of hundreds more, so students can retest themselves with different questions. And all responses both right and wrong result in helpful explanations. A companion book features test preparation suggestions and a list of all questions included in the Readiness Review exam.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735605374
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 11/19/1998
  • Series: MCSE Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 350
  • Product dimensions: 7.32 (w) x 8.93 (h) x 1.28 (d)

Table of Contents


!LOCKS command, DUMPEXAM command, 431, 432
!MEMUSAGE command, DUMPEXAM command, 431, 432
!PROCESS command, DUMPEXAM command, 431, 432
!VM command, DUMPEXAM command, 431, 432
% Disk time counter, 319
% Processor Time counter, 318, 323, 324
% Total Processor Time counter, 318, 327, 328, 339, 340
/B switch
    server-based installation, 42, 49-54, 57, 58, 60
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 117, 118, 121-24
/I:INF_FILE switch, 42
/O switch, 43, 49-52
/OX switch, 43
    server-based installation, 49, 50
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 117, 118
/S switch, 42
/T:DRIVE_LETTER switch, 42
/U switch, 51, 52, 65, 66
/U:ANSWER_FILE switch, 43
/UDF:ID switch, 43
/X switch, 42
    server-based installation, 49-52
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 117, 118

A

access control list, 19, 20
access failure, troubleshooting, 347, 405-10
access token, 408
Account Information dialog box, 151, 152
Active Directory, 237-40
adapter card drivers, installation and configuration, 83
Adapters tab, Network program, 205, 207-12
Add & Read permission, 180
Add permission, 180
Add Printer Wizard, 140, 191, 193, 194, 196
Add/Remove Programs function, Control Panel, 87, 88
Address Resolution Protocol, 247
Administrator privileges, 297, 298
Administrator user account, 141
Advanced RISC Computing Specification pathname, 38, 91, 92
answer files, 7, 8
    automated installation, 130-36
    configuration, 9, 10
    creating, 5, 6, 39
    defined, 3, 8, 13, 14
    reconfiguring, 391, 392
    /U switch, 51, 52, 65, 66
application base priorities, 281, 282, 291-98
application directory, 407, 408
application failure, troubleshooting, 345-47, 395-402
Application Log, Event Viewer, 401, 402
applications
    device drivers, 373, 374
    on various operating systems, 271-98
Applications tab, Task Manager, 295, 296, 303
application-termination messages, 395, 399, 400
ARC. See Advanced RISC Computing Specification pathname
ARP. See Address Resolution Protocol
ATTRIB command, 171, 172
automated installation, 129-36
Available bytes counter, 317
Average Disk Queue Length counter, 319, 339, 340
Average Disk sec/Transfer counter, 319

B

backup, 145, 146, 414
backup device, installation and configuration, 87, 88
base priority level, 293-98, 327, 328
bindery emulation environment, 237-40
Bindings tab, Network program, 205, 207-12
Boost settings, 104
boot floppies
    server-based installation, 42, 43, 49, 50
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 115-24
BOOT.INI file, 350
    deleting, 79, 80
    dual-boot system, 63-70
    installing, 38
    missing or corrupted, 350
    removing a partition, 75-8
boot process, steps, 349-50
boot process failure
    incorrect configuration changes, 345, 351-52
    missing or corrupted files, 345, 350-51
    troubleshooting, 345, 346, 349-66
BOOTSECT.DOS file
    functions, 79, 80, 350
    missing or corrupted, 350, 359, 360, 365, 366
boot sequence steps, 349-50
BOOT.SYS file, 79, 80
bottlenecks, troubleshooting, 301, 317-28, 345-432
bus configuration, optimization, 341, 342
bus-mastering DMA, 332, 341, 342

C

cache object, 304, 322
callback security, 260, 263, 264
CD-ROM drive, requirements for Windows NT Workstation, 41, 45-8, 53-60
Change permission, 22, 169, 180, 183-86
Change Permission permission, 179
Client Services for NetWare, 230, 233-42
communication protocols, network print server configuration, 195, 196
computer name
    customizing, 9-12
    two versions of Windows NT coexisting, 63, 65, 66
CONFIG.SYS file, modifying, 387, 388, 391, 392
configuration
    answer files, 9, 10
    boot process failure, 351-2
    with Control Panel, 95-104
    desktop, 84
    device drivers, 83-92, 102, 104, 191-8, 361-4
    Dial-Up Networking, 202, 259-70
    domains, 99, 100
    dual-boot system, 1, 27, 29, 30, 38, 63-70
    file systems, 1, 27, 29, 30
    hardware, 38, 83-92
    hardware profiles, 201, 215
    incorrect configuration changes, 351-2
    on Intel platform, 37, 41-3
        on Pentium-based computers, 53-60
        on Windows NT Workstation 3.51 computers, 45-52
    IP addresses, 202, 215
    modems, 99, 100
    with MS-DOS, 55-8, 67-70, 75, 76
    network components, 205-12
    paging file size, 101, 102
    Peer Web Services, 203, 209, 210, 273-8
    printers, 140, 192-8
    RAS, 201, 202, 215
    RAS server, 260, 265, 266
    Registry. See Registry
    removing Windows NT Workstation, 73-80
    server-based installation, customizing, 127-36
    switches, 42-3, 49-54
    TCP/IP, 202, 207, 208, 211, 212, 245-56
    thread priority, 103, 104
    uniqueness data files, 10, 134, 136
    user environment, 159-66
    user profiles, 201, 215
connectivity, 201-3
    Dial-Up Networking, 202, 259-70
    FTP, 246, 273, 277, 278
    Gopher, 273, 277, 278
    hardware profiles, 201, 215, 219-22
    IP addresses, 202, 215, 245, 249-54
    mapping network drives, 201, 215, 217, 218, 387, 388, 407, 408
    NetWare, 202, 229-42
    network components, 205-12
    NWLink, 202, 229, 235, 236
    Peer Web Services, 203, 209, 210, 273-8
    Remote Access Service, 201, 202, 215, 219-24, 259, 260, 265, 266, 276, 347, 406, 409, 410
    TCP/IP, 202, 207, 208, 211, 212, 225, 226, 245-56
    user access failure, troubleshooting, 347, 405-10
    user profiles, 140, 157-66, 201, 215
    World Wide Web, 273, 277, 278
Control Panel, 38, 83-92
    applications
        Add/Remove Programs function, 87, 88
        debugging, 423
        Devices application, 87, 88, 101-4
        Display program, 84
        Keyboard program, 85
        Modems application, 99, 100
        Mouse program, 85
        Multimedia program, 84
        Network application, 83, 87, 88, 101-4
        Network program, 201, 205, 207-12
        Ports application, 99, 100
        SCSI Adapters application, 83, 87, 88, 99, 100
        Server application, 101-4
        Services application, 101-4
        System application, 87, 88
        Tape Devices application, 84, 87, 88
        Telephony application, 99, 100
        UPS application, 84, 89, 90
    configuring NT Workstation, 95-104
        adding a path, 97, 98
        connectivity, 201-78
        domains, 99, 100
        dump files, 423-32
        modems, 99, 100
        paging file size, 101, 102
        thread priority, 103, 104
    hardware installation and configuration, 83-92
        display drivers, 84
        keyboard drivers, 84
        mouse drivers, 84
        multimedia devices, 84
        network adapter drivers, 83, 87, 88, 208
        printers, 140, 191-98
        SCSI device drivers, 38, 83, 91, 92, 361, 362
Control Panel (continud)
    hardware installation and configuration (continued)
        tape device drivers, 84, 87, 88, 361, 362
        UPS, 84, 89, 90
CONVERT utility, 76, 111, 112
copying files, with NTFS permissions, 140, 181
counters, 305, 310, 313, 314
    disk counters, 319, 322
    memory counters, 317, 321, 322
    processor counters, 318, 325, 326
CPU, monitoring, 307, 308
Creator Owner group, 175, 176
CSNW. See Client Services for NetWare
Current Disk Queue Length counter, 319

D

DCOM. See Distributed Component Object Model
debugging information, 423-32
DEC, 236
DECnet, 195, 196
default gateway, 245, 252, 253
default local user profile, changing, 159, 160
default printer, 397, 398
default tree, 237, 238
default user accounts, 141, 142
default user profile, 140, 159-66
Delete permission, 179
device bus, upgrading, 342
device drivers. See also individual device drivers
    emergency repair process, 361-4
    installation and configuration, 83-92, 102, 104, 191-8, 361-4
    Registry, 419, 420
    troubleshooting, 373, 374, 379, 380
device information files, 2, 13, 14, 391, 392
Devices application, Control Panel, 87, 88, 101-4
Device setting tab, Printer Properties window, 192
DHCP. See Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol server service
Dial-Up Networking, installation and configuration, 202, 259-70
Dial-Up Networking Monitor, 406, 409, 410
difference file, 7, 8
direct memory access, 331, 332
directory
    shared, 171, 172, 387, 388
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation, 4.0, 115, 116, 119-24
directory database, 208
Directory Service Manager for NetWare, 231
disk bottlenecks, troubleshooting, 319, 322-4, 373-6, 379-82
Disk Bytes/sec counter, 319
disk channel, reconfiguring, 333-8
disk controller, 32
disk counters, 319, 322
disk I/O speed, optimizing, 341, 342
disk performance, optimization, 331-2
DiskSave utility, 353-62
display drivers, installation and configuration, 84
Distributed Component Object Model, 233-6, 241, 242, 286
DLC protocol, 195, 196
DMA. See direct memory access
DNS. See Domain Name System
Domain Name System, 246, 275, 276
domains
    automated installation, 130-2
    configuration, 99, 100
    primary domain controller, 143, 149, 150
    roaming user profile, 140, 157, 161, 162, 219, 220, 223, 224
    User Manager for Domains, 143-6, 151-4
domain user account, 142, 145, 146
DOS 6.22 FDISK, 33, 34, 75, 76
DSMN. See Directory Service Manager for NetWare
dual-boot computers
    applications installation, 67, 68
    computer name, 65, 66
    configuration, 1, 27, 29, 30, 38, 63-70
    file system, 1, 27, 29, 30
    installation, 38, 63-70
    operating system choice, 69, 70
    removing Windows NT Workstation, 75, 76
    troubleshooting, 365, 366
DUMPCHK utility, 423, 429, 430
DUMPEXAM utility, 423, 425-32
dump files, 347, 423-32
DUMPFLOP utility, 423, 425-30
DUMPSPAN utility, 429, 430
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol server service, 202, 245, 249-52

E

EIDE backup tape drive, installation and configuration, 87, 88
emergency repair disk
    creating, 351
    Registry and, 414
emergency repair process, 351
    boot process failure, 345, 346
    BOOTSECT.DOS file, 359, 360, 365, 366
    device drivers, 361-4
    NTDETECT.COM file, 355, 356
    NTLDR file, 353, 354
    NTOSKRNL.EXE file, 357, 358
EMM386.EXE, 387-90
encryption, 260, 269
environment subsystem, 281, 283
environment variables, 98
error messages
    boot process failure, 349-66
    extended memory error message, 387, 388
    installation failure, 389, 390
    shared directory, 391, 392
Ethernet
    NetWare and, 235, 236
    TCP/IP, 253-6
    troubleshooting, 387, 388
Events, 307
Event Viewer, 307, 308
    Application Log, 401, 402
    boot process failure, 345, 347
    dump files, 427, 428
    function, 418, 420
    logs, 395
    RAS, 406
    System Log, 401, 402
Everyone group, 175, 176, 183, 184, 409, 410
Execute command, Windows NT, 294
Execute permission, 179
extended memory, 391, 392
extended memory error message, 387, 388

F

FAT. See file allocation table
    configuration, 29-32
    converting to NTFS partition, 76
    FDISK, 76
    moving and copying files, 181, 187, 188
    permissions, 181, 187, 188
    removing Windows NT partition, 73, 74, 76
    removing Windows NT Workstation, 38, 74
    security, 30-2
FAT partition, 34
FAT32, 29-32
FAT32 partition, 76
fault tolerance, 332-4
FDISK utility, 33, 34, 75, 76
file allocation table, 1, 27
File and Print Service Manager for NetWare, 231, 233-6, 241, 242
file compression, 27, 31, 32
file-level permissions, NTFS, 179, 180, 185-8
filenames, moving a folder, 187, 188
file sharing, 34
file systems, 1, 2
    configuration, 27-34
    dual-boot computers, 1, 27, 29, 30
    RISC-based computers, 27
file transfer, intranet, 277, 278
File Transfer Protocol, 246, 273, 277, 278
filtering, RAS, 260
FINGER, 246
floppy disk drive, requirements for Windows NT Workstation, 41, 45-8
FNPW. See File and Print Service Manager for NetWare
folder compression, 27, 217, 218
folders
    NTFS permissions, 179, 180, 183, 184
    shared, 2, 19, 20, 140, 169, 171-6
    sharing, 2
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation, 4.0, 109-14
frame type, 211, 212
FTP. See File Transfer Protocol
Full Control permission, 169
    No Access permission, 171
    NTFS permissions, 183-6, 409, 410
    Print permission, 191

G

Gateway Services for NetWare, 230, 233-42
General tab, Printer Properties window, 192
global group, 142, 143, 149, 150
Gopher service, 273, 277, 278
group account, 139, 142
GSNW. See Gateway Services for NetWare
guest user account, 141
GUI mode setup, 8

H

HAL.DLL file, 69, 70, 350
hard drive
    /B switch, 52
    file system, 31, 32
    freeing space on, 80
    minimum requirements for Windows NT Workstation, 41, 45-8
    optimization, 331-6
    removing Windows NT, 79, 80
    system partition, 29, 30, 33, 34
hard page faults, 317, 321, 322
hardware
    detecting, 69, 70, 84, 385
    installing, 38, 83-92
hardware (continued)
    installing supporting software, 13, 14
    minimum requirements for Windows NT Workstation, 41, 45-8
Hardware Compatibility List, 42, 83, 191, 389, 390,
399, 400
hardware profiles
    configuring, 201, 215
    multiple profiles, 219-22
High-Performance File System, 27
    configuration, 29-32
    converting to NTFS partition, 76, 112
High priority, 291-3
HIMEM.SYS, 387-90
hives, 350, 414
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT subtree, 415
HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG subtree, 415
HKEY_CURRENT_USER subtree, 415
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE subtree, 415, 418, 419, 420
HKEY_USERS subtree, 415
HOSTNAME utility, 247
HOSTS file, 246, 255, 256
HPFS. See High-Performance File System
HTML documents, 277, 278

I

IDE hard disk
    file system, 31, 32
    reconfiguring, 335, 336
    system partition, 33, 34
Identification tab, Network program, 205
IIS. See Internet Information Server
INF files. See device information files
initialization, boot process, 349
installation
    automated, 129-34
    device drivers, 83-92, 102, 104, 191-8, 361-4
    dual-boot system, 38, 63-70
    hardware detection, 69, 70, 84, 385
    hardware requirement, 41, 45-8
    on Intel platform, 37, 41-3
        on Pentium-based computers, 53-60
        on Windows NT Workstation 3.51 computers, 45-52
    on LAN, 9-12
    with MD-DOS, 55-8
    server-based, 39, 42-60, 127-36
    steps in, 385-6
    STOP screen, 389, 390
    switches, 42-3, 49-54
    troubleshooting, 345, 346, 385-92
    unattended installation, 1, 2, 3-14, 39, 135, 136
installation failure, troubleshooting, 345, 346, 385-92
integrated domain security, RAS, 260
Integrated Services Digital Network
    callback, 263, 264
    TCP/IP addresses, 252, 253, 259
intermediary security hosts, 260
Internet Explorer, 245, 307, 308
Internet Information Server, 175, 249, 250, 276
Internet Protocol address
    configuration, 202, 215
    TCP/IP, 245, 249-54
Internet Service Manager, 203, 273
Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange, 229
intranet, Peer Web Services, 273-8
“Invalid Partition Table” error message, 389, 390
IP address. See Internet Protocol address
IPCONFIG utility, 247
IPX/SPX. See Internetwork Packet Exchange/Sequenced Packet Exchange
ISDN. See Integrated Services Digital Network
ISM. See Internet Service Manager

K

kernel STOP error, troubleshooting, 423-32
keyboard drivers, installation and configuration, 85
key value, 417, 418

L

LAN, Windows NT Workstation installation, 9-12
LANGPACK folder, 5, 6
Last Known Good Configuration, 345, 346, 351, 353-64
Launch command, Windows NT, 294
LDAP, 195, 196
line printer daemon, 226, 227
List permission, 180
LMHOSTS file, 246, 255, 256
local group account
    creating, 139, 149, 150
    permissions, 183-6
Local Machine subtree, 415, 418, 419, 420
local user account, 139, 142
local user profile, 140, 157
logging on
    with Full Control permission, 191
    RAS, 260
    restricting, 145, 146, 151-4
logical disk object, 304
logon scripts, 221-4
logs, Event Viewer, 395
long filenames, moving a folder, 187, 188
Low priority, 291-3
LPD. See line printer daemon
LPR client, 226

M

MAC address. See media access control address
Manage Documents permission, 19, 20
mapping network drives, 201
    network resources, 217, 218
    troubleshooting, 387, 388, 407, 408
    universal naming convention (UNC), 215
Master Boot Record (MBR), 349, 353-62
media access control address
    customizing, 9-12
    defined, 226
memory
    extended memory, 391, 392
    extended memory error message, 387, 388
    minimum requirements for Windows NT Workstation, 41, 45-8
    monitoring, 309, 310
    optimization, 331-42
    page faults, 317, 321, 322
    troubleshooting, 317, 321-6, 387, 388
    virtual memory, 387, 388
    Win16 applications, 286
memory counters, 317, 321, 322
memory dump files, 347, 423-32
memory object, 304
Microsoft Internet Explorer, 245, 307, 308
Microsoft Internet Service Manager, 203, 273
Microsoft NWLink, 202, 229, 235, 236
Microsoft Peer Web Services, 203, 209, 210, 273-8
    Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit
    
Message Database help file, 347
    Registry tools, 347, 414
MIDI devices, installation and configuration, 84
Migration Tool for NetWare, 230
mirroring disks, 338
“missing operating system” error message, 389, 390
modem, configuration, 99, 100
monitoring, 301, 303-14. See also Performance Monitor; Task Manager
mouse drivers, installation and configuration, 85
moving files, with NTFS permissions, 140, 181, 187, 188
MS-DOS
    booting, 75, 76
    configuration, 55-8, 67-70, 75, 76
    dual-booting, 63, 69, 70, 75, 76, 365, 366
    FAT32 partition, 76
    triple-booting, 67, 68
MS-DOS-based applications, 283-6
MSDOS.SYS file, 77, 78
multimedia devices, installation and configuration, 84

N

name resolution, TCP/IP, 246
NBTSTAT utility, 247
NDS. See NetWare Directory Services
NetBEUI. See NetBIOS Enhanced User Interface
NetBIOS Enhanced User Interface, 235, 236
    disabling, 209, 210
    LANs and, 195, 196
    permissions, 408
    routers, 387, 388
NetBIOS names, 255, 256
NET SHARE command, 172
NETSTAT utility, 247
NetWare, 202, 229-42
    Client Services for, 230, 233-42
    Directory Service Manager for, 231
    File and Print Services for, 231, 233-6, 241, 242
    Gateway Service for, 230, 233-42
    Migration Tool for, 230
NetWare Directory Services, 235-8
network adapter card
    frame type, 211, 212
    TCP/IP, 245
network adapter drivers, installation and configuration, 83, 87, 88, 208
Network application, Control Panel, 83, 87, 88, 101-4
network components, configuration, 205-12
Network dialog box, 100
networked OLE, 286
Network Monitor, 311, 312
Network Monitor Agent, 208, 311, 312
network print server
    configuring, 191
    installing, 140, 193, 194
    “print server spooler sends job to print device,” 377-80
    spooling, 373, 374
    troubleshooting, 345, 346, 369-82
network settings, Registry, 417, 418
network share, 116, 120
No Access permission, 170-2
    defined, 408
    NTFS permissions, 180, 183-6
Normal priority, 291-3
NTBOOTDD.SYS driver, 92
NTDETECT.COM file
    defined, 70, 350
    missing or corrupted, 351, 355, 356
NTFS. See Windows NT File System
NTFS partition, converting to FAT, 76
NTFS permissions, 179-88
    file-level permission, 179, 180, 185-8
    folder-level permission, 179, 180, 183, 184
    moving files, 140, 181, 187, 188
    troubleshooting, 347, 405, 407-10
NTLDR file
    functions, 349-50
    missing or corrupted, 350, 353, 354
NTOSKRNL.EXE file
    functions, 350
    missing or corrupted, 351, 357, 358
NTVDM. See NT Virtual DOS Machine
NT Virtual DOS Machine
    applications, 281, 284-8
    troubleshooting, 396, 401, 402
NWLink, 202, 229, 235, 236

O

object instances, 305
objects, 304-5
ODBC. See Open Database Connectivity
OEMBootFiles=Yes, 9-12
OEMPreinstall=Yes, 9-12
OLE Custom Controls, 418
Open Database Connectivity, 277, 278
operating systems
    applications, 281-98
    BOOT.INI file, 38, 63, 67-70, 75-8
    Control Panel, Systems application, 88
    dual-booting, 38, 63-70
optimization, 302, 331-42
OS/2 subsystem, 283
out-of-memory error, 397, 398

P

Packet Internet Groper utility, 246
page faults, 314, 317, 322
Page Faults/sec counter, 314, 317, 322, 340
Page File Bytes counter, 314
“Page Locked” warning message, 401, 402
Pages Input/sec counter, 317, 322
Pages Output/sec counter, 317, 322
Pages Read/sec counter, 317, 322
Pages/sec counter, 317
Pages Write/sec counter, 317
Paging counters, 319
paging file
    changing size, 101, 102
    monitoring, 313, 314
    optimization, 331
paging file object, 304
partition
    file system, 29, 30, 33, 34
    removing a partition, 73-80
    removing Windows NT Workstation from FAT partition, 74
    scsi() syntax, ARC pathname, 92
partitions, moving and copying files between, 140
password, removing, 147, 148
path, adding to user environment, 97, 98
PDC. See primary domain controller
Peer Web Services, 203, 209, 210, 273-8
Performance Monitor
    functions, 304, 305, 401, 402
    monitoring, 307-14
    objects measured, 304
    troubleshooting, 321-4, 327, 328, 339, 340
performance problems. See troubleshooting
Performance tab, Task Manager, 296, 304
permissions. See also individual permissions
    FAT permissions, 181, 187, 188
    file-level, 179, 180, 185-6
    folder-level, 179, 180, 183, 184
    moving files, 140, 181, 187, 188
    NTFS permissions, 140, 179-88
    Print permissions, 2, 17, 19, 20, 191, 379, 380
    removing, 147, 148
    shared directory, 171, 172
    share-level security, 19, 20
    share permissions, 2, 140, 169-76
    troubleshooting, 397, 398, 405-10
Phonebook entries, 261, 263, 264, 267-70
physical disk object, 304
PING utility. See Packet Internet Groper utility
planning
    file systems, 1, 2, 27-34
    shared resources, 1, 2, 17-24
    unattended installation files, 1, 2, 3-14
Point-to-Point Protocol, 259
Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol, 259, 265, 266
Pool Nonpaged Bytes counter, 314
Pool Paged Bytes counter, 314
Portable Operating System Interface for Unix, 283
Ports application, Control Panel, 99, 100
Ports tab, Printer Properties window, 192, 198
POSIX. See Portable Operating System Interface for Unix
POST. See power on self-test
power on self-test, 349
PPP. See Point-to-Point Protocol
PPP.LOG file, 406
PPP Multilink Protocol, 267-70, 409, 410
PPTP. See Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol
PPTP filtering, RAS, 260
preemptive multitasking, 291, 297, 298
preferred server, 240, 241
primary domain controller
    creating, 143, 149, 150
    IP address, 249, 250
print drivers, troubleshooting, 373, 374, 379-82
printer priority, 2, 17, 21, 22
Printer Properties window, 192, 197, 198
printers. See also network print server
    controlling, 369
    default printer, 397, 398
    extra form feeds, 379, 380
    installation and configuration, 140, 191-8
    Manage Documents permission, 19, 20
    NetWare, 233, 234
    Print permission, 2, 17, 19, 20
    “print server spooler sends job to print device,” 377-80
    priority. See printer priority
    shared, 17, 19-24
    spooler directory, 22
    TCP/IP, 225, 226
    troubleshooting, 345, 346, 369-82
    user permissions, 2
Printers folder, 369, 371, 372
printing pool, 198
print job failure, troubleshooting, 345, 346, 369-82
Print permission, 2, 17, 19, 20, 191, 379-82
Priority Base counter, 318
priority level, applications, 281, 283, 291-8
Processes tab, Task Manager, 296, 303-4
Process Monitor utility, 307-11
process object, 304
processor
    optimization, 331
    troubleshooting, 318, 322-4
processor counters, 318, 325, 326
processor object, 304
Processor Queue Length counter, 318, 327, 328, 339, 340
Protocols tab, Network program, 205, 207-12
PSTN. See public-switched telephone network
public-switched telephone network, 259, 267, 268

R

RAM, uses, 388
RAS. See Remote Access Service
RAS server
    configuration, 260, 265, 266
    Dial-Up Networking, 252
RCP. See Remote Copy Protocol
RDISK utility, 351
Read, Write, and Execute permissions, 409, 410
Read permission, 170, 179, 180, 183-6
Read and Write access, troubleshooting, 409, 410
Real-time priority, 291-3, 297, 298
redirectory object, 304
REGBACK.EXE, 414
REGEDIT, 347, 414, 417, 418
REGEDT32, 347, 414, 417-20
REGENTRY.HLP, 414
REGINI.EXE, 414, 417-20
Registry, 347
    defined, 345, 413
    modifying, 413-20
    structure, 415
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 107,
109, 110
    viewing, 413
Registry Editor, 67, 68, 100, 414
REGREST.EXE, 414
REGSVR32, 417-20
Remote Access Service
    authentication, RAS, 260
    authentication settings, RAS, 406
    configuration, 201, 215, 219-24
    function, 276
    protocols, 259
    security, 260, 265, 266
    troubleshooting, 347, 406, 409, 410
Remote Access Setup dialog box, 260
Remote Copy Protocol, 246
Remote Execution, 246
Remote Shell, 246
Repair Disk utility, Registry and, 414
Response Probe, 307, 308
REXEC. See Remote Execution
RISC-based computers
    applications on, 281-8
    file system, 27
    SCSI driver, setting up, 91, 92
roaming mandatory user profile, 140, 157, 159, 160
roaming personal user profile, 140, 157, 159, 160
roaming user profile
    creating, 161, 162, 219, 220, 223, 224
    defined, 140, 157
router, disabling, 387, 388
ROUTE utility, 247
RSH. See Remote Shell
Run command, base priority, 293, 294

S

SAM. See Security Accounts Manager
SC. See service controller utility
Scheduling tab, Printer Properties window, 192
script files, Registry settings, 419, 420
SCSI Adapters application, Control Panel, 83, 87, 88,
99, 100
SCSI device drivers, installation and configuration, 38, 83, 91, 92, 361, 362
scsi() syntax, 38, 84, 91, 92
security
    callback security, 260
    domain user accounts, 142, 145, 146
    file allocation table, 30-2
    file system, 1, 29, 30
    filtering, 260
    integrated domain security, 260
    intermediary security hosts, 260
    RAS, 260, 265, 266
Security Accounts Manager, 208
security identifier number, 141, 147, 148
Security tab, Printer Properties window, 192-4
Serial Line Internet Protocol, 259
Server application, Control Panel, 101-4
server-based installation, 39, 42-60, 127-36
service controller utility, 308-11
services, 102, 104
Services application, Control Panel, 101-4
Services for Macintosh, 34
Services tab, Network program, 205, 207-12
setup boot floppies
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 115-20
    using, 42, 43, 50
Setup program, switches, 42-3, 49-52
setup table file, 7, 8, 13, 14
SETUP.TXT, 5, 6
SHARE command, 21, 22, 171, 172
shared data, troubleshooting, 401, 402
shared directory
    error message, 391, 392
    permissions, 171, 172
    troubleshooting, 387, 388
shared folders, 2, 19, 20
    permissions, 171-6, 179, 180, 183, 184
    setting up, 140, 169
    troubleshooting, 407, 408
shared memory, Win16 applications, 286
shared printers, 17
    installation and configuration, 140, 191-8
    Manage Documents permission, 19, 20
    NetWare, 233, 234
shared printers (continued)
    Print permission, 2, 17, 19, 20
    troubleshooting, 19-24
shared resources, 1, 2, 17-24. See also global group; user account
    displaying, 102, 104
    managing, 139-40
share-level security, 19, 20
share permissions, 2, 140
    troubleshooting, 169-76, 347, 405
Sharing tab, Printer Properties window, 192
SID. See security identifier number
Simple Network Management Protocol, 207, 208
SLIP. See Serial Line Internet Protocol
SMTP, 207, 208
SNMP. See Simple Network Management Protocol
soft page faults, 317
“specified shared directory cannot be found” error message, 391, 392
spooler directory, 22
spooling, network print server, 373, 374
Start command, base priority, 293, 294
STF. See setup table file
STOP screen, installation, 389, 390
stripe sets, 302, 331, 333, 334
subnet mask, 245, 252-5
subsystems, 281, 283
subtrees, 415
SUPPORT\DEPTOOLS\I386 folder, 5, 6
switches
    server-based installation, 42-3, 49-54
    setup programs, 42-3
    upgrading, 117, 118, 121-4
SYS C: command, 38, 75, 76, 79, 80, 365, 366
SYS.COM file, 79, 80
SYSDIFF.INF, 133, 134
SYSDIFF utility
    functions, 8, 39, 134
    Registry and, 417-20
    troubleshooting, 389, 390
SYS.INI file, 69, 70
System application, Control Panel, 87, 88
system environment variables, 98
system hives, 350, 414, 420
System Log, Event Viewer, 401, 402
system object, 304
system partition. See partition
system performance
    monitoring, 301, 303-14
    optimization, 302, 331-42
    troubleshooting, 301, 317-28, 345-432
System Policy Editor, 98
System Properties dialog box, 423
    Environment tab, 98
    Performance tab, 102, 104
    User Profiles tab, 98

T

Take Ownership permission, 179
tape device drivers, installation and configuration, 84, 87, 88, 361, 362
Tape Devices application, Control Panel, 84, 87, 88
Task Manager
    application base priorities, 291, 295, 296
    function, 401, 402
    monitoring performance, 301, 303-4, 307-12, 327, 328
TCP/IP
    configuration, 202, 207, 208, 211, 212, 225, 226, 245-56
    name resolution, 246
    NetWare, 235, 236
    utilities, 246-7
Telephony application, Control Panel, 99, 100
TELNET, 246
template user profile, 140, 161, 162
text-mode setup, 7, 8
TFTP. See Trivial File Transfer Protocol
thread object, 304
thread priority, 103, 104, 286, 291
TRACERT utility, 247
trap message, 207, 208
Trivial File Transfer Protocol, 246
troubleshooting, 301, 317-28, 345-432
    application failure, 345, 346, 347, 395-402
    boot process failure, 345, 346, 349-66
    disk bottlenecks, 319, 322-4
    installation failure, 345, 346, 385-92
    memory bottlenecks, 317, 321-6, 387, 388
    memory dump files, 347, 423-32
    network print server, 345, 346, 369-82
    NTFS permissions, 347, 405, 407-10
    permissions, 398, 405-10
    print job failure, 345, 346, 369-82
    processor bottlenecks, 318, 322-4
    RAS, 347, 406, 409, 410
    Registry, modifying, 347, 413-20
    user access failure, 345, 347, 405-10
TXT file, 13, 14

U

UDFs. See uniqueness data files
unattended installation
    customizing, 135, 136
    planning, 1, 2, 3-14, 39
UNATTEND.TXT, 5, 6, 134
uninterruptible power supply
    application, Control Panel, 84, 89, 90
    installation and configuration, 84, 89, 90
uniqueness data files, 2, 7-14
    configuration, 10, 134, 136
    defined, 3
    function, 8, 13, 14
    planning, 39
    Setup program, 43
universal naming convention (UNC), 217, 218
Unix, Portable Operating System Interface for, 283
UPS. See uninterruptible power supply
user access failure, troubleshooting, 347, 405-10
user accounts
    creating, 139, 151-4
    deleting, 147, 148
    domain user accounts, 142, 145, 146
    expiration date, 151-4
    renaming, 139, 142, 147, 148
    security identifier number, 141, 147, 148
User Environment Profile dialog box, 161
user environment, 98, 159-66
user-level security, 20
User Manager
    using, 97, 98, 153
    functions, 143, 172
User Manager for Domains, 143-6, 151-4
user name
    changing, 139
    customizing, 9-12
user permissions, 2
user profiles
    configuring, 201, 215
    connectivity, 201
    function, 157
    setting up, 140, 157-66

V

video device driver, troubleshooting, 363, 364
virtual memory, 387, 388
volume sets, 302, 331, 335, 336

W

Win16-based applications
    configuration, 182, 284-8
    troubleshooting, 396-8, 401, 402
Win16 on Win32 (Windows 95/NT), 281, 284-6, 396
Win32-based applications, troubleshooting, 399-402
Win32 subsystem, 283
Windows 3.x-based applications, 283, 284
Windows 3.1, user profiles, 159-66
Windows 95
    dual-booting, 63
    reverting back to, 79, 80
    triple-booting, 67, 68
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 39, 107, 109-10
Windows Internet Naming Service, 246, 249, 250
Windows NT
    dual-booting, 63
    emergency disk, 80
    install/uninstall, 75, 76
    operating system, 283
    removing from FAT partition, 74, 76
    removing from NTFS partition, 77, 78
    triple-booting, 67, 68
Windows NT Diagnostics, 311, 312
Windows NT Explorer, 171-4, 414
Windows NT File System, 1, 27
    configuration, 28-32
    converting FAT partition to, 76, 112
    file compression, 31, 32
    removing Windows NT partition, 73, 77, 78
    security, 30-2
Windows NT Setup Manager, location, 6
    Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit
    
Message Database help file, 396
    Registry tools, 347, 414
Windows NT Workstation
    applications, 281-98, 339, 340
    configuration. See configuration
    connectivity, 201-78
    Control Panel, use with, 83-92, 95-104
    desktop, 84
    dual-booting, 1, 27, 29, 30, 38, 63-70
    file systems, 1, 2, 27-34
    Hardware Compatibility List, 42, 83, 191, 390, 400
Windows NT Workstation (continued)
    hardware requirements, 41, 45-8
    installation. See installation
    managing resources. See permissions; shared resources
    monitoring, 301, 303-14
    MS-DOS, 55-8
    NetWare, 202, 229-42
    optimization, 302, 331-42
    Peer Web Services, 203, 209, 210, 235, 236, 245-56
    planning. See planning
    removing, 38, 73-80
    reverting to Windows 95, 79, 80
    shared resources. See shared resources
    TCP/IP, 202, 207, 208, 225, 226
    triple-booting, 67, 68
    troubleshooting, 301, 317-28, 345-432
    uninstalling, 79, 80
    upgrading, 107-24
Windows NT Workstation 3.51
    dual-booting, 63, 65, 66
    installing NT Workstation 4.0, 45-52
    upgrading to NT Workstation 4.0, 107, 111-24
Windows NT Workstation 4.0
    dual-booting, 63, 65-8
    upgrading to, 39, 107-24
WINN32.EXE, 42
    switches, 49-52
    upgrading with, 39
WINN.EXE, 42
WINNT32.EXE, 55, 56
    double booting, 65, 66
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 107, 109-24
WINNT.EXE, 53, 54, 57-60
    double booting, 65, 66
    upgrading to Windows NT Workstation 4.0, 111-4, 117, 118
WINS. See Windows Internet Naming Service
WINVER=4.0, 68
workgroups. See shared resources
World Wide Web service, 273, 277, 278
WOW. See Win16 on Win32 (Windows 95/NT)
Write permission, 179
WWW. See World Wide Web

X

X.25 network, 259

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Chapter 7
Troubleshooting
  • Objective Domain 7: Troubleshooting
    • Tested Skills and Suggested Practices
  • Objective 7.5: Choose the appropriate course of action to take when a user cannot access a resource.
    • Permissions Checklist
      • Key Terms
      • Further Reading

Objective Domain 7: Troubleshooting

The Troubleshooting domain covers problem resolution for various areas in Windows NT Workstation using a variety of tools. The problems and troubleshooting options discussed are:

Problem Troubleshooting options
Boot process failure Use the emergency repair process.
Use the Last Known Good Configuration option.
Print job failure Control the printer using the Printer folder.
Use resources such as the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit or the Windows NT Server Reference Guide to determine problems and tests.
Installation failure Use references to determine problems and tests.
Application failure Check STATUS messages.
Use Event Viewer.
User access failure Use the permissions checklist in this chapter.
Use troubleshooting tools for Remote Access Service.

This domain also covers the following advanced troubleshooting tools:

Tool Description
Registry Tool used to edit system configuration via remote access.
Memory dump file Tool used to create a file for analysis by technical support.

Tested Skills and Suggested Practices

  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when the boot process fails. You must be able to distinguish between a missing or corrupted boot file and an incorrect configuration, and use the appropriate tools for recovery.
    • Practice 1: Learn the steps in the boot process. Recognize the files needed for booting in your operating system and their functions.
    • Practice 2: Determine when to use the emergency repair process. Learn to recognize the common boot process error messages. Read about the procedure and materials necessary for restoring missing or corrupted boot files.
    • Practice 3: Determine when to use the Last Known Good Configuration option. Learn to recognize the symptoms of an incorrect configuration. Read about the procedure for using the Last Known Good Configuration option.
  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when a print job fails. You must be able to resolve local and network printing problems.
    • Practice 1: Control a print job from the Printers folder. Use the Printer menu to pause printing on a printer and purge documents. Use the Document menu to pause, resume, and restart a print job.
    • Practice 2: Learn the seven processes involved in a network printing job. Using references, familiarize yourself with the symptoms and tests for each process. Using resources such as the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit or the Windows NT Server Resource Guide, view the series of troubleshooting steps for printing.
  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when the installation process fails. You must be able to resolve installation process problems.
    • Practice 1: Learn the installation process. Using references, familiarize yourself with the typical problems encountered while installing Windows NT Workstation and their solutions.
  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when an application fails. You must be able to resolve application problems.
    • Practice 1: Learn the symptoms of an application failure. Read about the three types of STATUS messages that detect conditions in an application. Familiarize yourself with the various STATUS messages.
    • Practice 2: Use the Event Viewer to view events for an application. View detail for an event. Familiarize yourself with the Message Database help file on the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit CD.
  • Choosing the appropriate course of action to take when a user cannot access a resource. You must be able to resolve resource access problems.
    • Practice 1: Distinguish between share permissions and NT File System (NTFS) permissions. Analyze how each type of permission affects users, groups, folders, and files using the Permissions Checklist. Learn how combining share permissions and NTFS permissions can secure resources. Learn how moving and copying folders and files within or between NTFS and file allocation table (FAT) file systems affects permissions.
    • Practice 2: Identify troubleshooting tools for Remote Access Service (RAS). Determine which tool to use in a given situation.
  • Modifying the Registry using the appropriate tool in a given situation. You must be able to resolve basic configuration problems using the Registry Editor.
    • Practice 1: Familiarize yourself with Registry tools. Distinguish between the capabilities of REGEDT32 and REGEDIT. Learn which Registry-management tools are provided with Windows NT. Learn which Registry-management tools are provided on the Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Resource Kit CD.
    • Practice 2: Learn the Registry structure. Know the five subkeys and the areas they control. Determine which subkey to modify in a given situation.
  • Implementing advanced techniques to resolve various problems. You must be able to create a memory dump file for use in system troubleshooting.
    • Practice 1: Learn the procedure for creating a memory dump file. Learn the three utilities for processing memory dump files. Know which utility to use in a given situation.

Objective 7.5: Choose the appropriate course of action to take when a user cannot access a resource.

Typically, users cannot access a resource because of inadequate access permissions. The following permissions checklist is a list of items to consider when troubleshooting a situation that involves access and permissions:

Permissions Checklist

  • What is the permission assigned to the user? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • To which group(s) is the user assigned? What is the permission assigned to the group(s)? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • What is the permission assigned to the folder? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • What is the permission assigned to the file? Is the permission a share permission or an NTFS permission?
  • What rules for combining share permissions and NTFS permissions apply to this situation?
  • Is the resource you want to access on a FAT or an NTFS partition?
  • Have files or folders recently been copied or moved within NTFS volumes or between NTFS or FAT volumes? How has this move affected the permissions on the files or folders?

If you have problems with Remote Access Service (RAS) access, you can use the following tools:

  • Event Viewer—Used to view RAS events in the system log.
  • Dial-up Networking Monitor—Used to show the status of a session in progress, including the duration of the call, amount of data being transmitted and received, number of errors, and lines being used for Multilink sessions.
  • PPP.LOG file—Can be created to provide debugging information for PPP connections.
  • Authentication settings—Used to provide a range of encryption levels. Authentication settings can be set low to start and increased to the highest level that can be used successfully between two systems.

Questions related to this objective are designed to determine if you have an awareness of these issues. To successfully answer the questions for this objective, you need a firm understanding of several key terms. For definitions of these terms, refer to the Glossary in this book.

Key Terms

  • Access token
  • Dial-Up Networking
  • Multilink Protocol (MP)
  • NTFS permissions
  • Permissions
  • Remote Access Service (RAS)
  • Share permissions

70-073.07.05.001

A user on a Windows NT Workstation client computer has No Access permissions to a shared folder on a Windows NT server. She needs Read and Change permissions to the folder. The permissions were granted directly to the user’s Windows NT user account, but she is still not able to access the folder.

What should you do to solve this problem?

  1. Grant the user ownership of the share.
  2. Have the user log off and then back on.
  3. Map a drive to the share using the UNC path.
  4. Make sure NetBEUI is configured on the client computer.

70-073.07.05.002

An application directory was moved from one NTFS partition to another NTFS partition on the same Windows NT Server. Users that were able to access the application directory before the move are not able to access it now.

What should you do first to solve this problem?

  1. Check for inherited permissions.
  2. Have users log off and then back on.
  3. Map a network drive to the new location.
  4. Make sure there is adequate free disk space at the new location.

70-073.07.05.001

A user on a Windows NT Workstation client computer has No Access permissions to a shared folder on a Windows NT server. She needs Read and Change permissions to the folder. The permissions were granted directly to the user’s Windows NT user account, but she is still not able to access the folder.

What should you do to solve this problem?

Correct Answer: B

  1. Incorrect: Granting ownership of the share will allow the user to share the folder or assign permissions to the folder, which is not necessary.
  2. Correct: Since the permissions were granted directly to the user’s account, the user must log off and log back on for the permissions to take effect. An access token that contains permissions information is created for a user every time he logs on. To update the access token, a user must log off and log on again; a remote user must disconnect and then reconnect.
  3. Incorrect: Mapping a drive to the shared folder will not provide access to the folder. In order to map a drive, you must first have the appropriate permission.
  4. Incorrect: NetBEUI is a protocol and will not affect the permission assigned for the shared folder.

70-073.07.05.002

An application directory was moved from one NTFS partition to another NTFS partition on the same Windows NT Server. Users that were able to access the application directory before the move are not able to access it now.

What should you do first to solve this problem?

Correct Answer: A

  1. Correct: Since the directory was moved to another NTFS partition, the directory has inherited the permissions of the destination folder. By changing the permissions on the destination folder, you can restore access to the users.
  2. Incorrect: Since the user’s permissions were not changed, logging off and then logging back on is not necessary.
  3. Incorrect: Mapping a drive to the application directory will not provide access to the directory. In order to map a drive, you must first have the appropriate permission.
  4. Incorrect: There is no indication that users are encountering a memory problem; adding free disk space will not solve a permission problem.

70-073.07.05.003

Your computer running Windows NT Workstation has two modems. You are having trouble establishing a RAS session to a remote server using the PPP Multilink Protocol (MP). Each time you attempt to dial the RAS server, the session lasts only a few seconds before disconnecting.

The required result is to monitor the status of a dial-up networking session that is in progress.

The first optional result is to monitor the number of errors occurring during the dial-up networking session. The second optional result is to determine which lines are being used for Multilink sessions.

The proposed solution is to attempt the RAS session again, and view the connection status using Dial-Up Networking Monitor.

What does the proposed solution provide?

  1. The required result and all optional results.
  2. The required result and one optional result.
  3. The required result but none of the optional results.
  4. The proposed solution does not provide the required result.

70-073.07.05.004

You need to grant Read and Write access to a user on a file located in the shared folder \MKTG. You assign the Read and Write NTFS permissions to this file. The user complains that he still cannot save changes to that file. He has already logged off and back on again and still has the problem.

Which condition could be the cause of the problem?

  1. The NTFS permission on the \MKTG folder is set to Read Only.
  2. The NTFS permission on the \MKTG folder is set to Read, Write, and Execute.
  3. The user is not a member of the Everyone group which has Full Control permissions on this folder.
  4. The user is a member of the Everyone group, which has Full Control permissions on the \MKTG folder.

70-073.07.05.003

Your computer running Windows NT Workstation has two modems. You are having trouble establishing a RAS session to a remote server using the PPP Multilink Protocol (MP). Each time you attempt to dial the RAS server, the session lasts only a few seconds before disconnecting.

The required result is to monitor the status of a dial-up networking session that is in progress.

The first optional result is to monitor the number of errors occurring during the dial-up networking session. The second optional result is to determine which lines are being used for Multilink sessions.

The proposed solution is to attempt the RAS session again, and view the connection status using Dial-Up Networking Monitor.

What does the proposed solution provide?

Correct Answer: A

  1. Correct: The Dial-Up Networking Monitor is used to troubleshoot RAS, and monitors the status of a dial-up networking session in progress. In addition, the Dial-Up Networking Monitor provides the number of errors that occur during the dial-up session and can also show which lines are used for Multilink sessions.
  2. Incorrect: See the explanation for answer A.
  3. Incorrect: See the explanation for answer A.
  4. Incorrect: See the explanation for answer A.

70-073.07.05.004

You need to grant Read and Write access to a user on a file located in the shared folder \MKTG. You assign the Read and Write NTFS permissions to this file. The user complains that he still cannot save changes to that file. He has already logged off and back on again and still has the problem.

Which condition could be the cause of the problem?

Correct Answer: A

  1. Correct: You provided Read and Write NTFS permissions to the user for the file. The NTFS permission for the /MKTG folder is Read, which prohibits the user from accessing the file. Set the share permission for the /MKTG folder to Change and the user will be able to save changes to the file.
  2. Incorrect: If the NTFS permission for the \MKTG folder is Read, Write, and Execute, the user would be able to save changes to the file.
  3. Incorrect: Being a member of the Everyone group, which has Full Control, has no effect on the NTFS permissions set for the /MKTG folder or for the file within the folder.
  4. Incorrect: Being a member of the Everyone group, which has Full Control, has no effect on the NTFS permissions set for the /MKTG folder or for the file within the folder.

Further Reading

The Microsoft Windows NT Network Administration volume of the Microsoft Windows NT Network Administration Training kit Chapter 6, Lesson 2 provides details on combining share permissions and NTFS permissions and includes a short video and exercises explaining how the two types of permissions work together. Lesson 7 provides information on troubleshooting permission-related problems. Practice for troubleshooting permission problems is included on the CD provided with this kit.
The Microsoft Windows NT Technical Support volume of the Microsoft Windows NT Technical Support Training kit Chapter 12, Lesson 5 provides information on troubleshooting Remote Access Service.
Windows NT Workstation 4.0 Study Guide. Osborne McGraw-Hill, Berkeley, CA, 1998. ISBN 0-07-882492-3. Chapter 6 contains detailed information on access tokens, file and directory security using NTFS, share permissions, and moving and copying files and folders. There is also a discussion of using share permissions with NTFS permissions.
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