MCSE Training Kit (Exam 70-225): Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Design and Deployment

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With this official MCSE TRAINING KIT, IT professionals learn how to design and deploy a messaging infrastructure using Exchange 2000 Server. As they build these real-world systems-engineering skills, they're also getting in-depth preparation for MCP Exam 70-225-an elective on the MCSE track for the Windows(r) 2000 operating system. Topics map directly to the objectives measured by the exam, including analyzing business requirements, assessing existing and planned resources, designing a messaging solution, ...
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Overview

With this official MCSE TRAINING KIT, IT professionals learn how to design and deploy a messaging infrastructure using Exchange 2000 Server. As they build these real-world systems-engineering skills, they're also getting in-depth preparation for MCP Exam 70-225-an elective on the MCSE track for the Windows(r) 2000 operating system. Topics map directly to the objectives measured by the exam, including analyzing business requirements, assessing existing and planned resources, designing a messaging solution, creating fault-tolerance and data-recovery strategies, and solution deployment. Students learn through an integrated system of lessons, case-study-based exercises, and self-assessment. An economical alternative to classroom instruction, this kit enables working professionals to set their own pace and learn by doing!

Key Book Benefits:

  • Offers detailed, from-the-source instruction for designing an Exchange 2000 Server-based messaging solution
  • Provides in-depth preparation for MCP Exam 70-225, which can be used to fulfill one of two elective requirements on the Windows 2000 MCSE track
  • Features a searchable version of the study guide on CD-ROM-for training anytime, anywhere
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780735612570
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press
  • Publication date: 8/25/2001
  • Series: MS Banner Temp Series
  • Edition description: 2000 Edition
  • Pages: 600
  • Product dimensions: 7.75 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 2.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq 'MSFT') is the worldwide leader in software for personal and business computing. The company offers a wide range of products and services designed to empower people through great software—any time, any place, and on any device.

Kay Unkroth is a former German Microsoft PSS engineer responsible for the Microsoft messaging products. In 1998 he started his own consulting business Corporate OnSite Ltd. in London/UK and he authored the highly acclaimed Microsoft Exchange Server Training Kit.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 6: Designing an Upgrade Plan to Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server

    • About This Chapter
    • Before You Begin
  • Lesson 1: Integrating Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 with Windows 2000 Server
    • Integrating the Exchange Directory with Active Directory
    • Synchronizing Recipient Information
    • Designing Connection Agreement Topologies
    • Synchronizing Multiple Exchange Server Organizations in One Forest
    • Developing a Directory Integration Strategy for Wide World Importers
    • Activity: Developing Directory Integration Strategies
    • Lesson Summary
  • Lesson 2: Integrating Exchange 2000 Server with Exchange Server 5.5
    • Exchange 2000 Server in Mixed Mode
    • Exchange Server Interoperability Issues
    • Developing a Coexistence Strategy for Wide World Importers
    • Activity: Developing an Exchange/Exchange 2000 Server Coexistence
    • Strategy
    • Lesson Summary
  • Lesson 3: Upgrading Exchange Server 5.5 to Exchange 2000 Server
    • Exchange Server 5.5 Upgrade Methods
    • Developing an Upgrade Plan
    • Designing an Upgrade Plan for Wide World Importers
    • Activity: Designing Upgrade Plans
    • Lesson Summary
  • Review

About This Chapter

Upgrading from earlier versions of Microsoft Exchange Server to Microsoft Exchange 2000 is a complex undertaking that affects both the messaging environment and the underlying network operating system. Earlier versions of Exchange can run on Microsoft Windows NT Server and Windows 2000 Server. Exchange 2000 Server, on the other hand, requires Windows 2000 and the Active Directory service. Hence, if your users are currently working in a Windows NT domain, upgrading the Exchange organization means upgrading to Windows 2000 Server as well. The implementation of an appropriate Windows 2000 and Active Directory environment for Exchange 2000 is discussed in Chapter 3, "Assessing the Current Network Environment."

The actual upgrade from Exchange Server consists of three phases: integration with Windows 2000 Server, coexistence with Exchange 2000 Server, and upgrading to Exchange 2000 Server. In the first phase, you will populate Active Directory with Exchange recipient information and keep both directories synchronized. This is a prerequisite for any upgrade procedure. In the second phase, you will install Exchange 2000 Server in such a way that both platforms can recognize each other as part of the same messaging organization. Seamless coexistence is vital because functioning messaging environments are seldom replaced all at once. For this reason, upgrading to Exchange 2000 Server is a gradual process. Usually, the upgrade phase overlaps with the coexistence phase. Step by step, you will move resources to Exchange 2000 Server, and the project ends when the last non-Exchange 2000 server is upgraded or decommissioned.

This chapter focuses on a deployment of Exchange 2000 Server in an organization running Exchange Server 5.5, with the intent to upgrade the entire environment to Microsoft’s new messaging and collaboration platform. Lesson 1 covers important aspects related to the integration of Exchange Server with Active Directory. Lesson 2 then explains how to implement Exchange 2000 Server in an existing infrastructure. Lesson 3 concludes this chapter with a discussion of possible upgrade strategies.

Before You Begin

To complete the lessons in this chapter, you need to

  • Be knowledgeable about the various dependencies of Exchange 2000 Server on the underlying network infrastructure and Active Directory, as discussed in Chapter 3, "Assessing the Current Network Environment"
  • Be experienced in administering a messaging organization based on Exchange Server 5.5, including recipient, site, connector, and server management
  • Be aware of the technical features and benefits of Exchange 2000 Server, as explained in Chapter 1, "Introduction to Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server"

Lesson 1: Integrating Microsoft Exchange Server 5.5 with Windows 2000 Server

It is advantageous to migrate the entire Windows NT environment to Windows 2000 Server before integrating Exchange Server with Active Directory. At a minimum, you should upgrade all primary domain controllers (PDCs). This ensures that all user accounts are Windows 2000 security objects, which greatly simplifies system integration because it avoids the creation of duplicate user objects. If you cannot upgrade your Windows NT domains for any reason, you need to create separate accounts for your users in Active Directory to synchronize them with mailbox information from the Exchange Directory. When upgrading the Windows NT domains later on, you may end up with duplicated directory objects for each user, which requires an explicit cleanup using the Active Directory Cleanup Wizard. Windows NT accounts are not automatically merged during the upgrade. The preparation of the Windows 2000 environment for Exchange 2000 Server is covered in more detail in Chapter 3, "Assessing the Current Network Environment."

This lesson explains how to integrate Exchange Server 5.5 with Active Directory. You can read how user account and mailbox information are synchronized between the Exchange Directory and Active Directory and what you need to take into consideration to design a straightforward synchronization topology. You can also learn how to use Active Directory to synchronize recipient information from different Exchange organizations with each other.

After this lesson, you will be able to

  • Explain how to integrate Exchange Server 5.5 with Active Directory using the Active Directory Connector (ADC)
  • Describe the difference between primary and nonprimary connection agreements (CAs) and the configuration of CAs in complex environments with multiple Windows 2000 domains and multiple Exchange sites
  • Develop appropriate strategies for synchronizing Windows 2000 user objects with Exchange mailbox information

Estimated time to complete this lesson: 120 minutes

Integrating the Exchange Directory with Active Directory

Integration with Active Directory is an asset if you are currently operating an Exchange Server 5.5 organization in a Windows 2000 Server environment, even if you don’t plan to move to Exchange 2000 Server. Among other things, Active Directory integration can help to facilitate the administration of user accounts and mailbox resources. On the other hand, if you are planning to upgrade, directory integration is a requirement. A smooth upgrade requires you to consolidate user account and mailbox information in Active Directory before installing the first Exchange 2000 server.

Directory Integration Using the Active Directory Connector

To integrate Exchange and Active Directory with each other, you need to install the ADC that ships with Exchange 2000 Server. The ADC is a Windows 2000 service that performs a synchronization of the directories based on the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), as indicated in Figure 6.1. You can find this component on the Exchange 2000 Server product CD in the \ADC\i386 directory. To install the ADC, launch SETUP.EXE from this location. You need to have the rights of a schema, enterprise, and domain administrator.

Because the ADC is a directory application, it is a good idea to install it directly on a Windows 2000 domain controller. In fact, Microsoft recommends a Global Catalog (GC) server. Keep in mind, however, that the hardware must be able to handle the extra workload. If the network connection to the nearest GC is fast and reliable, you can also install the ADC on a member server. The ADC computer should run Windows 2000 Server Service Pack 1. The Exchange Server version should be Exchange Server 5.5 with Service Pack 3 or later.

The ADC consists of two components, which you can install separately or on the same machine:

  • The Microsoft Active Directory Connector service This is the Windows 2000 service that performs the actual directory synchronization. The account being used to run the ADC service must be a member of the local Administrators group.

    Figure 6.1 - Directory synchronization based on the ADC

  • The Active Directory Connector Manager snap-in This is the management utility that allows you to configure the directory synchronization based on CAs, which are explained later in this lesson.

NOTE
It is advisable to check your Active Directory environment and fix any inconsistencies before installing the ADC. This is accomplished quickly using DCDIAG.EXE, which is available from Microsoft—go to www.microsoft.com and search for the phrase "DCDIAG." You can install this program on your domain controller together with the other Windows 2000 Support Tools, such as ADSI Edit. Make sure you place this program in a folder in the system search path. You can then simply type dcdiag at the domain controller’s command prompt to launch a test.


LDAP Port Conflicts

No ADC description would be complete without explaining how to handle the LDAP port conflict that occurs when running Exchange Server 5.5 on a Windows 2000 domain controller. Domain controllers listen on Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) port 389, as does the LDAP interface of the Exchange Directory. Active Directory always starts before Exchange Server and will always allocate TCP port 389 without giving the Exchange Directory service a chance to use it. You cannot change the Active Directory ports, but you can adjust the port number for the LDAP interface of Exchange Server in the Exchange Administrator program (see Figure 6.2). On most Windows 2000 domain controllers, TCP port 379 or port 390 is available for the Exchange Directory.

Figure 6.2 - Resolving an LDAP port conflict

Another option to resolve the port conflict is to remove Active Directory from the Exchange server—that is, if other Windows 2000 domain controllers are still available in the domain to provide authentication services. Removing Active Directory using DCPROMO.EXE does not affect the Exchange Server installation. Exchange can run on member servers without problems and without LDAP port conflicts. However, removing Active Directory is a less preferable solution than the simple change of a port number.

Extending the Active Directory Schema

The ADC Setup program must extend the Active Directory schema with Exchange-specific classes and attributes. Extending the schema means that Windows 2000 has to rebuild all GCs, resulting in a large amount of replication traffic. Exchange 2000 Server also requires you to extend the schema, and again, the GCs will have to be rebuilt. Therefore, if you intend to upgrade to Exchange 2000 Server at the end of the day, it is a good idea to prepare the Active Directory forest right away by running Setup in ForestPrep mode before installing the ADC. A prepared Active Directory forest does not require the ADC Setup program to extend the schema, saving you the extra replication cycle. You need to be a schema, enterprise, and domain administrator to successfully run Setup /ForestPrep in the root domain.


NOTE
Setup /ForestPrep extends the schema, prompts you for an organization name, creates the Exchange 2000 organization in Active Directory, and delegates the Exchange Full Administrator role to a specified user account. You are prompted to join an Exchange Server organization if an ADC has already been deployed in the forest. Make sure that the Exchange 2000 organization name matches exactly the name of your Exchange Server organization.


Windows 2000 vs. Exchange 2000 ADC

It is important to note that there are two versions of the ADC. One version comes with Windows 2000 Server and can be used to connect Exchange Server 5.5 to Active Directory when Exchange 2000 Server is not available. The other version comes with Exchange 2000 Server. To support a mixed Exchange organization, you need to deploy the version that comes with Exchange 2000. The ADC that ships with Windows 2000 Server is unable to replicate configuration information and does not support seamless system integration. You can read more about the replication of configuration information in Lesson 2.


NOTE
Use the ADC that comes with Exchange 2000 Server to connect Exchange Server 5.5 to Active Directory.


Synchronizing Recipient Information

The ADC does not synchronize or replicate directory information automati- cally. You need to configure this service manually using the ADC management console. Right-click the Active Directory Connector object, point to New, and then select Recipient Connection Agreement. Among other things, you need to specify the servers that host the directories to be synchronized, the directory objects to synchronize, the synchronization direction, and a synchronization schedule. You also need to specify user accounts to access the servers. Remember that the accounts must write information to the target directories. You can configure one-way (from Exchange Server 5.5 to Windows 2000, or vice versa) or two-way CAs.


NOTE
In multidomain environments, make sure that the specified Windows 2000 server is a GC server to ensure that all requested objects are included in the directory synchronization.


Connection Agreement Types

The Exchange 2000 ADC supports three types of CAs (recipient CA, public folder CA, and configuration CA) to synchronize recipient and configuration information between the directories. In the context of integrating Exchange Server 5.5 with Active Directory, recipient CAs are most important. Public folder and configuration CAs, on the other hand, facilitate the integration of Exchange 2000 with Exchange Server 5.5. They are covered in Lesson 2.


NOTE
Depending on the number of users and the power of your domain controller, it may take several hours to fully synchronize Exchange Directory with Active Directory. For a two-way CA, budget up to 1 hour per 1000 users.


Mapping of Recipient Information

Recipient CAs are able to selectively synchronize mailboxes, distribution lists, and custom recipients, respectively, with mailbox-enabled user accounts, distribution groups, and contact objects. You can configure separate CAs to specify different destination containers for each type or enable all types in one CA.

The ADC maps recipient objects in the following way:

  • Mailboxes correspond to mailbox-enabled user accounts that may in turn be enabled or disabled.
  • Distribution lists correspond to universal distribution groups.
  • Custom recipients correspond to contact objects.

Synchronizing Distribution Lists

A subtle design requirement revolves around the creation of groups in Active Directory for distribution lists in Exchange Server 5.5. Exchange uses distribution lists to set permissions on public folders, whereas the ADC creates universal distribution groups, which cannot be used for this purpose in Exchange 2000 Server.

Because Exchange 2000 fully integrates with Windows 2000 security to protect its resources, only security groups (not distribution groups) can be used to grant or deny permissions. For this reason, when you integrate Exchange 2000 Server into the environment, the system will attempt to automatically convert the ADC’s distribution groups to universal security groups. This conversion will fail in a domain operating in mixed mode because security groups are only available in native mode. For this reason, if possible, switch your Windows 2000 domains into native mode, or at least create a small resource domain, switch it into native mode, and let the ADC place all distribution groups in this domain. You can create a separate recipient CA for the synchronization of distribution lists and distribution groups if necessary (see Figure 6.3).

Figure 6.3 - Transferring distribution lists into a dedicated native-mode domain

Synchronizing Resource Accounts

There is one more issue you need to take into consideration before activating your recipient CAs. In Active Directory, every mailbox-enabled user has exactly one mailbox, and every mailbox corresponds to one user object. In Exchange Server 5.5, however, a Windows account can have multiple mailboxes. For instance, you may be responsible for a number of resource accounts, in which case you will work with a personal mailbox and a number of resource mailboxes. The challenge is to synchronize the correct mailbox with your Windows 2000 user account and create separate directory objects for the remaining resource mailboxes. This will not affect your ability to log on to any of these mail- boxes because your Windows 2000 account remains the primary Microsoft Windows NT account in Exchange Server 5.5.

Figure 6.4 illustrates the problem that multiple mailboxes with the same primary Windows security object can pose. The ADC synchronizes the first mailbox with the user object, where the security identifier (SID) of the primary Microsoft Windows NT account matches the SID of the user account in Active Directory. For the other mailboxes it either creates a contact, enabled user, or disabled user, depending on the CA configuration. Hence, you may end up with the wrong mailbox information in your user object. To prevent this problem, you must force the ADC to create a separate user account for each resource mailbox. This can be achieved by setting the custom attribute 10 of your resource mailboxes to NTDSNoMatch, which indicates, "Even if you find a matching user object, do not use it."

Figure 6.4 - Synchronizing a resource mailbox into a user account

To put it plainly, you must determine all those mailboxes in your organization that should not be synchronized with any existing users to set their custom attribute 10 to NTDSNoMatch. Depending on the number of mailboxes, this can be a time-consuming job. Fortunately, Microsoft provides a helpful utility called NTDSNOMATCH that makes things easier. NTDSNOMATCH checks for mailboxes with the same primary Windows NT account, determines whether the mailbox alias matches the Windows account name, and, if it does not, assigns the mailbox the NTDSNoMatch value. The output is a series of comma-separated value (.csv) files that you can edit further or import directly into the Exchange Directory to apply the custom attributes. The NTDSNOMATCH utility is available through Microsoft Product Support Services (MS PSS).


MORE INFO: To Correct Mismatched Accounts After Directory Synchronization

If an ADC has synchronized a user object with the wrong mailbox information, you need to clean up both Exchange and Active Directory using low-level tools. It is a good idea to contact MS PSS for assistance.

For your reference, here are the steps you should follow:

  1. Stop the ADC service.
  2. Launch ADSI Edit (available in the support tools of Windows 2000 Server), and connect to the domain naming context (NC) of the user accounts.
  3. Open the desired organizational unit (OU), and display the properties of the problematic user account.
  4. Delete the values from the msExchADCGlobalNames attribute.
  5. Launch the Exchange Administrator program in raw mode (type admin /r ).
  6. For each of the mailboxes matched to the user account, display the raw properties (File menu, Raw Properties command), and remove all the values from the ADC-Global-Names attribute.
  7. For each resource mailbox, set the custom attribute 10 to NTDSNoMatch.
  8. Start the ADC service and check the outcome of the directory synchronization.

Use caution when using ADSI Edit or the Exchange Administrator program in raw mode to change values. Incorrect values may seriously damage Active Directory and may force you to reinstall the entire Windows 2000 environment. Keep in mind that you modify directory attributes at your own risk....

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
About This Book
Ch. 1 Introduction to Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 1
Ch. 2 Preparing for a Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server Deployment Project 51
Ch. 3 Assessing the Current Network Environment 89
Ch. 4 Assessing the Current Messaging Infrastructure 165
Ch. 5 Designing a Basic Messaging Infrastructure with Exchange 2000 Server 203
Ch. 6 Designing an Upgrade Plan to Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 255
Ch. 7 Designing a Migration Plan to Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 315
Ch. 8 Designing Hosted Services with Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 357
Ch. 9 Implementing Security for Hosted Services 423
Ch. 10 Designing Fault Tolerance and System Resilience for Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 473
Ch. 11 Designing a Disaster Recovery Plan for Microsoft Exchange 2000 Server 509
App. A: Questions and Answers 543
App. B: Flowcharts 587
Glossary 631
Index 689
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