MCSE Windows 2000 Accelerated Exam Prep

MCSE Windows 2000 Accelerated Exam Prep

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by Lance Cockcroft, Erik Eckel, Ron Kauffman, Eric Eckel
     
 

Covers all curriculum objectives for the Microsoft Windows 2000 Accelerated exam (70-240). Offers a proven method for in-depth study, review, and real-life practice. Provides all of the overviews, concepts, and terminology necessary to help candidates get up to speed on the new certification as quickly as possible. Compares all changes between the Windows NT system… See more details below

Overview

Covers all curriculum objectives for the Microsoft Windows 2000 Accelerated exam (70-240). Offers a proven method for in-depth study, review, and real-life practice. Provides all of the overviews, concepts, and terminology necessary to help candidates get up to speed on the new certification as quickly as possible. Compares all changes between the Windows NT system and the new features of the Microsoft operating system to provide the reader with the experience necessary to upgrade to the new system.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781576106907
Publisher:
Coriolis Value
Publication date:
08/01/2000
Series:
Exam Prep Series
Edition description:
CD-ROM
Pages:
1000
Product dimensions:
7.74(w) x 9.57(h) x 2.17(d)

Meet the Author


Lance Cockcroft, MCP+I, MCSE+I, MCT, A+, Network+, CCNA (Atlanta, GA) is currently the CTO of Applied Network Solutions, a Microsoft Certified Solutions Provider that has been working with Windows 2000 OS since beta 2. He has taught Microsoft Official Curriculum at Kennsaw State University, and Southern Polytechnic University since 1996.

Erik Eckel, MCP+I, MCSE (Louisville, KY) has been testing Windows 2000 operating systems since their beta 2 implementations. He wrote and edited one of the industry's leading Windows 2000 white papers. Eric serves as an editor for TechRepublic, an online resource site for information professionals.

Ron Kauffman, MCP+I, MCSE, MCT, A+ (Louisville, KY) currently works as an IT Manager and Chair of the MCSE Education programs at a private college. He is a freelance writer for a Microsoft Tech Net content provider, and serves as an IS management Consultant for local companies.

More from this Author

Read an Excerpt


Chapter Two: Windows 2000 Installation and Setup

After completing this chapter, you will be able to:

  • Describe a proper preinstallation checklist
  • List the minimum requirements for installing Windows 2000 Professional and Windows 2000 Server
  • Select the appropriate file system for your Windows 2000 installation
  • Explain the licensing options available with Windows 2000
  • Discuss the five Windows 2000 installation methods and setup configurations
  • Explain the prerequisites for installing Windows 2000 in a domain
  • Troubleshoot faulty Windows 2000 installations

Before you can enjoy the new enhancements and features included in Windows 2000, you must install the new operating system. However, the setup process cannot be completed unless you are prepared to provide the necessary hardware and setup information required by the new operating system.

This chapter discusses the need for reviewing a pre-installation checklist and understanding Windows 2000's minimum requirements. In addition, it examines the different licensing options available to administrators, and the installation and setup processes.

Windows 2000's installation and set up routines are similar to the routines found on the Windows NT 4 platform. However, Windows 2000 enhance-ments improve the installation process, and new configuration tools and services make Windows 2000 easier to install, whether you're installing the new OS via CD-ROM, over the network, via disk duplication, or with the use of the new Remote Installation Services (RIS). By planning an installation in advance and ensuring necessary information is prepared beforehand, common difficulties can be avoided.

This chapter examines the installation options and common troubleshooting strategies. Once completed, you'll have a solid understanding of the pre-installation requirements, licensing choices, installation and setup configuration options, and troubleshooting strategies.

Preinstallation Checklist

Pilots always complete a checklist before taking to the skies. Administrators should do the same before installing or upgrading to Windows 2000. While much of the information needed prior to installing Windows 2000 is similar to that required for Windows NT 4, several important differences exist. For example:

  • There are new installation options, including use of the new Remote Installation Services. You'll also find support for disk duplication.
  • Windows 2000 boasts Plug and Play support.
  • Windows 2000 requires more powerful hardware.

In addition to knowledge of these differences and others, administrators should properly design and plan an installation. Without a solid understanding of the new platform's requirements, improvements, and capabilities, it would be difficult to maximize the use of new features. Further, administrators must install Windows 2000 on systems with appropriate hardware to ensure trouble- free operation.

Review Hardware Requirements

The first step when preparing a Windows 2000 installation is to ensure that all of a system's devices are included on the Windows 2000 Hardware Compatibility List (HCL). The HCL file (HCL.TXT) can be found on the Windows 2000 CD-ROM in the Support folder. Microsoft also keeps an updated HCL on its Web site at www.microsoft.com/hwtest/hcl.

If a device isn't listed in the HCL, the vendor's Web site can be checked for the availability of an updated driver. Beware, though–third-party drivers sometimes prove unreliable. For this reason, you should only use hardware that's included on the HCL and known to be compatible with Windows 2000. Otherwise, performance can become erratic and failures and errors can be difficult to isolate and repair. And, if your hardware is not listed on the HCL, Microsoft technical support will not support it.

Along with all the powerful new enhancements and Windows 2000 services come increased system requirements. Administrators are well-advised to check the systems they're installing Windows 2000 on to ensure that the systems meet the minimum requirements demanded by the operating system. This step should be taken before the Windows 2000 installation process begins.

Administrators should strive to exceed the minimum requirements for operating the software, when possible. While the OS will operate on systems possessing the minimum hardware requirements, performance improves remarkably on systems configured with more powerful processors and additional RAM and disk storage space. Tables 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3 show the minimum hardware requirements for Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, and Windows 2000 Advanced Server.

Note: Microsoft no longer creates software builds for the 32-bit or 64-bit Alpha platforms. However, future 64-bit software products are being developed for Intel-based systems.

Table 2.1 Minimum hardware requirements for Windows 2000 Professional.

Component Requirement

CPU Pentium 133MHz or higher (supports up to 2)

Input devices Keyboard and mouse or other input device

Disk space 650MB free space on 2GB hard disk

RAM 64MB minimum

Secondary drives 12X or better CD-ROM, 3.5 disk drive, or NIC

Display VGA or better

Table 2.2 Minimum hardware requirements for Windows 2000 Server.

Component Intel

CPU Pentium 133MHz or higher (supports up to 4)

Input devices Keyboard and mouse or other input device

Disk space 1GB free space on 2GB hard disk (additional space needed if installing over a network)

RAM 128MB (minimum), 256MB (recommended), 4GB (maximum)

Secondary drives 12X or better CD-ROM, 3.5 disk drive, or NIC

Display VGA or better

Table 2.3 Minimum hardware requirements for Windows 2000 Advanced Server.

Component Intel

CPU Pentium 133MHz or higher (supports up to 8)

Input devices Keyboard and mouse or other input device

Network connectivity Network adapter card

Disk space 1GB free space on 2GB hard disk (additional space needed if installing over a network)

RAM 128MB (minimum), 256MB (recommended), 8GB (maximum)

Secondary drives 12X or better CD-ROM, 3.5 disk drive, or NIC

Display VGA or better

After you've determined that a system possesses or exceeds the necessary hardware requirements, you're ready to move on to the next step–selecting a partition and file system for your installation.

Select a File System

Upon loading, the Windows 2000 Setup program examines a system's hard disk. After determining a system's configuration, Windows 2000 then provides the option to install the OS on an existing partition or the opportunity to create a new partition for the installation.

A drive can include up to four primary partitions or three primary partitions and an extended partition. A Windows 2000 installation requires that a minimum of 650MB be available on a 2GB or larger hard disk. However, you should have even more disk space available for use with additional services, utilities, and features.

Tip: During Windows 2000 setup, you should use the Setup program only to create the partition where you intend to install the new operating system.

After you've selected the partition for the installation, you must select the file system. Windows 2000 supports the FAT, FAT32, and NTFS file systems. Microsoft recommends that you select NTFS for your entire system, because many of Windows 2000's features, including security enhancements, rely on the file system for their functionality. In fact, Windows 2000 Active Directory and domain controllers require NTFS partitions to be available. Table 2.4 shows the features of FAT, FAT32, and NTFS....

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