McTeague a Story of San Francisco (Classic Reprint)

McTeague a Story of San Francisco (Classic Reprint)

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by Frank Norris
     
 

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Excerpt from McTeague a Story of San Francisco

The suggestiveness Of these facts, even in so bare an outline Of Norris's human experience, is too plain to be mistaken. That he drew largely upon his own Observation and personal experience must be evident to every careful reader Of his books. He takes us into the throbbing financial centres Of his native Chicago in

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Excerpt from McTeague a Story of San Francisco

The suggestiveness Of these facts, even in so bare an outline Of Norris's human experience, is too plain to be mistaken. That he drew largely upon his own Observation and personal experience must be evident to every careful reader Of his books. He takes us into the throbbing financial centres Of his native Chicago in The Pit, to Harvard in Vandover and the Brute, to San Francisco in such stories as Moran and the Lady Letty, Blix, and mcteague. But this is not all. It is not a light undertaking to tell the truth about life, and there were many things in Norris's experience which tended to concentrate his attention on certain aspects Of life, and led him to interpret the riddle Of existence from a too exclusively modern point Of view. Life had been revealed to him as it was in two ultra-modern, intensely commercial, and highly prosperous Western cities, where there was much that was crude, blatant, and vulgar, unsoftened and unsteadied by the gracious influences of a long past. There was no background; no vague, mysterious distance. Like Nature herself, in that clear, restless, Western atmosphere, everything showed glittering and distinct, with sharp, hard out lines. And even if we add to this Norris's compara tively brief experiences in Paris and at Harvard, there is still something lacking; there is still that self-assured and pervading modemness, weak in spiritual appre hension, little fitted to nourish reverence, humility, and awe.

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This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440082672
Publisher:
FB &c Ltd
Publication date:
08/08/2015
Pages:
462
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.93(d)

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McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Riveting is right! One would never know that this book was originally published in 1899. It reads like a modern novel, and I found it extremely hard to put down. You have a sensation of being carried from page to page by the author, without being aware of the words which transport you. The psychological tension was built very artfully. And it was so delightful to read about everyday life in San Francisco in the 1890's -- I went out and bought some genuine San Francisco Anchor steam beer afterwards! The story was so popular that one director created a 10-hour B&W silent version of the book in the 1920's! This was the first book I read by Frank Norris, and I was oh so pleasantly surprised. What a tragedy that Norris died at the age of 32 what a wealth of fine literature he could have provided us. This is a great book on many levels, and the B&N Library of Essential Reading edition is especially handsome and readable.
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Nestor_J More than 1 year ago
Its a great read; felt sort of like a precursor to The Great Gatsby.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous 5 months ago
Okami slowly wraps his arms around her. Then the teacher clears her throat. "Mr. Okami and Ms. Zawa. Would you two like to go to the Principle to talk about your violation of the rule of no PDA?" Okami reluctantly lets Zawa go, and she does the same. Okami sits down in the seat next to her, and she stretches out her leg, resting it against his knee. Then the bell rang for lunch. They go to the lunchroom. As they pass a couple of boys, the taller one sticks his foot out, tripping Zawa and causing her to fall.****** post your part on the usual book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago