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Mcteague - A Story Of San Francisco
     

Mcteague - A Story Of San Francisco

4.0 8
by Frank Norris
 

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At first McTeague has a simple but satisfying life, surrounded by three symbolic possessions: a caged canary, a concertina, and a gold-plated molar he wants to use as his shop sign. McTeague can be seen as the canary, imprisoned in his gilt cage by the forces of society and heredity; the concertina represents his pleasure in plebeian culture and the molar, his

Overview

At first McTeague has a simple but satisfying life, surrounded by three symbolic possessions: a caged canary, a concertina, and a gold-plated molar he wants to use as his shop sign. McTeague can be seen as the canary, imprisoned in his gilt cage by the forces of society and heredity; the concertina represents his pleasure in plebeian culture and the molar, his crude profession. Norris also shows the effects of striving for social status. McTeague comes from a family of poor miners; as a dentist, he is barely on the cusp of professional respectability. Described as "hopelessly stupid," he reverts to his innate brutish roots. His wife, Trina, comes from equally humble origins, but apes what she perceives to be the habits of those higher up the social scale.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781595477729
Publisher:
NuVision Publications
Publication date:
11/08/2007
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.64(d)

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McTeague: A Story of San Francisco (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Riveting is right! One would never know that this book was originally published in 1899. It reads like a modern novel, and I found it extremely hard to put down. You have a sensation of being carried from page to page by the author, without being aware of the words which transport you. The psychological tension was built very artfully. And it was so delightful to read about everyday life in San Francisco in the 1890's -- I went out and bought some genuine San Francisco Anchor steam beer afterwards! The story was so popular that one director created a 10-hour B&W silent version of the book in the 1920's! This was the first book I read by Frank Norris, and I was oh so pleasantly surprised. What a tragedy that Norris died at the age of 32 what a wealth of fine literature he could have provided us. This is a great book on many levels, and the B&N Library of Essential Reading edition is especially handsome and readable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Nestor_J More than 1 year ago
Its a great read; felt sort of like a precursor to The Great Gatsby.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okami slowly wraps his arms around her. Then the teacher clears her throat. "Mr. Okami and Ms. Zawa. Would you two like to go to the Principle to talk about your violation of the rule of no PDA?" Okami reluctantly lets Zawa go, and she does the same. Okami sits down in the seat next to her, and she stretches out her leg, resting it against his knee. Then the bell rang for lunch. They go to the lunchroom. As they pass a couple of boys, the taller one sticks his foot out, tripping Zawa and causing her to fall.****** post your part on the usual book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago