Me and My Dad: A Baseball Memoir

Overview

Paul O'Neill was the undisputed heart and soul of the four-time World Series–winning New York Yankees from 1993 to 2001. A champion and an icon, he was a dedicated, intense athlete who not only wore the trademark pinstripes with pride, he bled blue and white. O'Neill epitomized the team's motto of hard work and good sportsmanship, traits instilled in him by the man who was his friend, confidant, lifelong model, and biggest fan: his dad, Chick O'Neill.

Paul O'Neill has rarely ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (57) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $6.20   
  • Used (55) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$6.20
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(104)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2003-05-13 Hardcover New Ships USPS with tracking number. We ship daily from Tennessee!

Ships from: knoxville, TN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$58.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Me and My Dad: A Baseball Memoir

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.79
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

Paul O'Neill was the undisputed heart and soul of the four-time World Series–winning New York Yankees from 1993 to 2001. A champion and an icon, he was a dedicated, intense athlete who not only wore the trademark pinstripes with pride, he bled blue and white. O'Neill epitomized the team's motto of hard work and good sportsmanship, traits instilled in him by the man who was his friend, confidant, lifelong model, and biggest fan: his dad, Chick O'Neill.

Paul O'Neill has rarely spoken publicly about the significant role his father played in his baseball career. But now, in Me and My Dad, he speaks from the heart about the man who inspired in him a love for the game and a determination to always play his best. For some, baseball is more than a game — it's a way of life. Chick O'Neill was one of those people. Paul recounts how his father, after serving as a paratrooper in World War II, pitched in the California minor league, until he discovered that his true passion was his family. Later he was devoted to his son's dream of becoming a professional ball player and was always there — from coaching Little League to being in the stadium when Paul played for the Cincinnati Reds and the New York Yankees.

In Me and My Dad, Paul also remembers the highlights of his amazing career: being called up to the majors by the Reds, his first World Series, being traded to the Yankees — and taking part in their phenomenal four World Series wins. He also reflects on his father's untimely death during the 1999 World Series and the farewell tribute given to him by his fans during his last game in Yankee Stadium.

Paul O'Neill's memories treat us to Yankee stories, hometown tales, and valuable insights into what has made him the person he is today, all of it shaped by his relationship with his father.

One of the most beloved baseball players of all time shares the poignant story of his career and his greatest inspiration--his father. O'Neill treats readers to Yankee lore, hometown stories, and valuable insights into what makes him the person he is today.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Overcome with emotion, Paul O'Neill couldn't step to the podium during his father, Chick's, funeral in October 1999. But nearly four years later, O'Neill -- a former star outfielder with the New York Yankees and the youngest of Chick and Virginia O'Neill's six children -- has delivered a touching eulogy to his father in his autobiography, Me and My Dad.

O'Neill proves as adept at spinning a charming and rich yarn as he was at getting a dramatic hit when his team needed him most. Me and My Dad reads as if it were told around the fireplace, and O'Neill's descriptions of Sunday morning family breakfasts and the dank hallway running behind Fenway Park's "Green Monster" are impressively evocative.

O'Neill regularly recalls his days with the New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds, but Me and My Dad is mostly about O'Neill's worship of his father, a former minor league pitcher who loved baseball almost as much as his family. The famously self-critical O'Neill never inherited his father's sunny optimism -- every 0-for-5 day left O'Neill wondering if he'd ever get another hit -- but the elder O'Neill's supportive ways not only filled his son with the belief he could succeed at baseball's highest level but also prepared Paul for fatherhood.

O'Neill writes, "There may be no greater gift than having someone else believe [a dream] with you." Indeed, Me and My Dad will move anyone who has ever been lucky enough to experience a father's unconditional love and support. Jerry Beach

The New York Times
The book demonstrates a profound lesson for anyone about what a child can accomplish with a parent's steadfast love. — Andrea Cooper
Publishers Weekly
As every Yankee fan knows, the New York right fielder was devoted to his father, Chick, who he describes as "my childhood hero, my pal, and my mentor." It was Chick who imbued his son, the youngest of six children, with the love of all sports, particularly baseball. It was also his father's hard work, O'Neill writes in this sentimental memoir, that created an idyllic childhood for the youngest O'Neill, when summers in Columbus, Ohio, were filled with baseball games coached by his father and where winter brought hockey games on a homemade ice rink in the family backyard. Life for the youngest O'Neill was so ideal that he was drafted by his favorite team, the nearby Cincinnati Reds, and he married his childhood sweetheart, Nevalee. Then in 1993 he was traded to the Yankees; as the heart and soul of the team during his nine years in New York, O'Neill won four World Series and became a fan favorite. O'Neill's most bittersweet series was in 1999, when his father was critically ill and died the day before the final game, and O'Neill's memories of this period are particularly moving. This autobiography is more about relationships than events, and entire years in early in O'Neill's career are summed up in a sentence or two. Unlike his former teammate David Wells, this does not have a bad word to say about anyone (including Wells) or anything connected to baseball. While his fans may have expected some fireworks from the fiery Yankee, O'Neill proves himself to be a dedicated player devoted to his family and baseball. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
O'Neill capped eight years with the Cincinnati Reds by starring from 1993 to 2001 as right fielder for the Yankees. In an emotional story dedicated to his late father, Charles (Chick) O'Neill, who died in 1999, Paul relates how his Dad shaped his life and career-coaching, critiquing, and encouraging this intense, hard-driving ballplayer. He folds into the account his impressions of managers, fellow players, and life in the major leagues and the World Series. With principal appeal to libraries around New York and in Ohio, this father-and-son story may also fit in YA collections.-Morey Berger, St. Joseph's Hopital Lib., Tucson, AZ Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Hard-driving Yankee outfielder O'Neill melds a sweet, plainspoken tribute to his father. No wonder he played with such energy, enthusiasm, and savvy: the third generation of his family to enter professional ball, O'Neill was raised in the Church of Baseball. For his father, Chick, it "was less a game than a way of life, a set of rules and philosophies, challenges and opportunities that provided order in the universe." When O'Neill writes that baseball embodies "hard work, sacrifice, courage, devotion to family and nation, overcoming hardship, reaching for dreams," he's not just talking through his hat, but ticking off attributes he drew upon to make his career. His father worked to instill in O'Neill, a notoriously emotional player known for flinging his helmet or working over water coolers after missed opportunities in the batter's box, the understanding that sportsmanship was as important as great play, fun was the name of the game, and optimism would trump a lousy at-bat. This attitude didn't come easy, but his father was always there for him, encouraging and getting him back in line all the way through O'Neill's apprenticeship in the minors, his fine years with the Cincinnati Reds, and his triumphs as a Yankee. (Chick passed away during the 1999 World Series.) O'Neill covers his many career highlights, including those searing line drives, World Series by the peck, and three perfect games. He also makes intelligent comments on salaries and the value of fans, as well as nothing-but-blue-skies tributes to his teammates. Fans will enjoy getting a peek into the life and quirks of this formerly media-shy player. As much an antidote to David Wells trash talk as we’re likely to get.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060524050
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/13/2003
  • Edition description: 1ST
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul O'Neill was a right fielder for the New York Yankees. A frequent announcer and commentator on the YES Network, he lives in Cincinnati, Ohio. Burton Rocks is the author of three previous sports-related books. He lives in Stony Brook, New York.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Me and My Dad

A Baseball Memoir
By O'Neill, Paul

Perennial

ISBN: 0060595795

Chapter One

Family Man

Being the youngest of the six O'Neill children ultimately turned out to be one of the luckiest things that ever happened in my baseball career.

But as I was growing up, it was often a double-edged sword, in more ways than one. When it came to learning about family history, being last in line meant I got mostly hand-me-downs, bits and pieces of stories Dad might tell in his offhanded, by-the-way manner, and other, longer versions filtered through my older siblings who, naturally, knew more than I did about everything.

But what I did figure out at a very young age was that we had the potential to become a third generation of professional baseball players that had started with Dad's father, Art O'Neill, who played in the minor leagues in the early 1900s. Grandpa Art's father, great-grandfather John O'Neill, was a Nebraska homesteader who had married Mary Clemens, possibly a cousin to Samuel Clemens, alias Mark Twain. My mother, guardian and patron saint of the part of our education that wasn't about sports, must have been glad that this literary influence in our ancestry on Dad's side was as much in our blood as baseball was. Later that turned out to be the case, when two out of the six of us -- Molly and Robert -- took up the pen professionally. In the meantime our sports genes were of much more interest to me.

Grandpa Art, born in the late 1800s, grew up in a time when professional baseball was in its infancy. Though the National League had been around since the 1870s, the American League was formed only in 1901; the general public was just beginning to catch on. For a young man like Art O'Neill, working hard, long hours as a foreman in charge of the Omaha Grain Elevator in South Ravenna, playing ball could only be an amateur interest -- squeezed into whatever little time was left over in the workweek. But fate intervened when the grain elevator closed for the harvest in 1909, and my grandfather, with a growing family to support, was forced to find a money-paying job for which he was qualified. As it so happened, he was a darn good baseball player and within no time he was making headlines in the April 12, 1909, edition of the Ravenna Times, which reported that "Art O'Neill signed for seventy-five dollars a month to play baseball out in Billings, Montana."

Grandpa Art's stint in the minors coincided with a critical change in baseball that took place in 1911, when the adoption of a ball that had a cork center dramatically increased the potential for high-flying hits and home runs. Before that time the so-called dead ball first used in the game limited the frequency of home runs, forcing batters to rely on mental strategy, bunts, and base stealing. With the more aerodynamic ball, a whole new realm of competition opened up, and crowds began flocking to ballparks as never before.

This was the climate in which Art O'Neill honed his skills, eventually dropping out of the minors and going into the dairy business in Nebraska, where his brood of good Irish stock grew to eight children: Sham, Lucy, Peg, Jack, Russ, Pat, my dad Charles "Chick" (born March 18, 1920), and Clark. All in all, six sons and two daughters. In spite of the brutal winters and blistering summers, seasons that could wipe out the farm family's livelihood, Dad grew up fearless, with a true pioneer mentality, knowing that his father would somehow manage to do what he had to do in order for them to survive and not starve. They bartered, borrowed, and kept the faith, and everyone pitched in. Dad went to work in the corn fields on his family's dairy farm at an early age, the sunburn marks left by the straps of his overalls a permanent mark of pride.

Life was tough, but -- at least in the warmer months -- the baseball that Dad learned from Grandpa Art provided an escape, something to take the edge off. Baseball soothed the soul, lit the imagination, and provided him with a rhyme and reason to the hard routine of life. It was community and connection, with his family and friends coming together to play games, but it also let him commune with himselftesting the limits of his skills, pushing himself to be better than just good. He strove for greatness, then as later, inciting the rest of us to follow in that tradition.

In the off-seasons, Dad recalled that the entertainment revolved around Friday-night dances, a main course that was a prelude to the dessert -- a fistfight out back after one so-and-so insulted the honor of some other so-and-so. From what I could tell as a young boy listening to his stories, the dancing and mingling with the opposite sex wouldn't be complete without somebody later getting in a good shot or two of a fist of five.

Dad led me to understand that whaling on somebody --- like one of my brothers, for instance -- wasn't to be encouraged. But back in the "old times," folks in Nebraska wore their hearts on their sleeves, and when it came to family pride, Grandpa Art had passed down the idea that if the O'Neill name was challenged, you stuck up for it. Besides, they'd make up the next day, apologize, and be friends again. Dad convinced me that physical fighting was only appropriate when family dignity was in question. And, fortunately, because most of the arguments occurred between O'Neills -- having to do with who was cheating in one sport or another -- I was mostly kept out of any serious brawling.

During Dad's growing-up years, baseball was in its glory days of the Roaring Twenties, when Babe Ruth, the most amazing hitter the country had ever seen, and his New York Yankees revolutionized the sport ...

Continues...

Excerpted from Me and My Dad by O'Neill, Paul Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Me and My Dad
A Baseball Memoir

Chapter One

Family Man

Being the youngest of the six O'Neill children ultimately turned out to be one of the luckiest things that ever happened in my baseball career.

But as I was growing up, it was often a double-edged sword, in more ways than one. When it came to learning about family history, being last in line meant I got mostly hand-me-downs, bits and pieces of stories Dad might tell in his offhanded, by-the-way manner, and other, longer versions filtered through my older siblings who, naturally, knew more than I did about everything.

But what I did figure out at a very young age was that we had the potential to become a third generation of professional baseball players that had started with Dad's father, Art O'Neill, who played in the minor leagues in the early 1900s. Grandpa Art's father, great-grandfather John O'Neill, was a Nebraska homesteader who had married Mary Clemens, possibly a cousin to Samuel Clemens, alias Mark Twain. My mother, guardian and patron saint of the part of our education that wasn't about sports, must have been glad that this literary influence in our ancestry on Dad's side was as much in our blood as baseball was. Later that turned out to be the case, when two out of the six of us -- Molly and Robert -- took up the pen professionally. In the meantime our sports genes were of much more interest to me.

Grandpa Art, born in the late 1800s, grew up in a time when professional baseball was in its infancy. Though the National League had been around since the 1870s, the American League was formed only in 1901; the general public was just beginning to catch on. For a young man like Art O'Neill, working hard, long hours as a foreman in charge of the Omaha Grain Elevator in South Ravenna, playing ball could only be an amateur interest -- squeezed into whatever little time was left over in the workweek. But fate intervened when the grain elevator closed for the harvest in 1909, and my grandfather, with a growing family to support, was forced to find a money-paying job for which he was qualified. As it so happened, he was a darn good baseball player and within no time he was making headlines in the April 12, 1909, edition of the Ravenna Times, which reported that "Art O'Neill signed for seventy-five dollars a month to play baseball out in Billings, Montana."

Grandpa Art's stint in the minors coincided with a critical change in baseball that took place in 1911, when the adoption of a ball that had a cork center dramatically increased the potential for high-flying hits and home runs. Before that time the so-called dead ball first used in the game limited the frequency of home runs, forcing batters to rely on mental strategy, bunts, and base stealing. With the more aerodynamic ball, a whole new realm of competition opened up, and crowds began flocking to ballparks as never before.

This was the climate in which Art O'Neill honed his skills, eventually dropping out of the minors and going into the dairy business in Nebraska, where his brood of good Irish stock grew to eight children: Sham, Lucy, Peg, Jack, Russ, Pat, my dad Charles "Chick" (born March 18, 1920), and Clark. All in all, six sons and two daughters. In spite of the brutal winters and blistering summers, seasons that could wipe out the farm family's livelihood, Dad grew up fearless, with a true pioneer mentality, knowing that his father would somehow manage to do what he had to do in order for them to survive and not starve. They bartered, borrowed, and kept the faith, and everyone pitched in. Dad went to work in the corn fields on his family's dairy farm at an early age, the sunburn marks left by the straps of his overalls a permanent mark of pride.

Life was tough, but -- at least in the warmer months -- the baseball that Dad learned from Grandpa Art provided an escape, something to take the edge off. Baseball soothed the soul, lit the imagination, and provided him with a rhyme and reason to the hard routine of life. It was community and connection, with his family and friends coming together to play games, but it also let him commune with himselftesting the limits of his skills, pushing himself to be better than just good. He strove for greatness, then as later, inciting the rest of us to follow in that tradition.

In the off-seasons, Dad recalled that the entertainment revolved around Friday-night dances, a main course that was a prelude to the dessert -- a fistfight out back after one so-and-so insulted the honor of some other so-and-so. From what I could tell as a young boy listening to his stories, the dancing and mingling with the opposite sex wouldn't be complete without somebody later getting in a good shot or two of a fist of five.

Dad led me to understand that whaling on somebody --- like one of my brothers, for instance -- wasn't to be encouraged. But back in the "old times," folks in Nebraska wore their hearts on their sleeves, and when it came to family pride, Grandpa Art had passed down the idea that if the O'Neill name was challenged, you stuck up for it. Besides, they'd make up the next day, apologize, and be friends again. Dad convinced me that physical fighting was only appropriate when family dignity was in question. And, fortunately, because most of the arguments occurred between O'Neills -- having to do with who was cheating in one sport or another -- I was mostly kept out of any serious brawling.

During Dad's growing-up years, baseball was in its glory days of the Roaring Twenties, when Babe Ruth, the most amazing hitter the country had ever seen, and his New York Yankees revolutionized the sport ...

Me and My Dad
A Baseball Memoir
. Copyright © by Paul O'Neill. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2008

    A Fantastic Family Story

    This book gives an example of an inspiring relationship between a father and a son. You often hear of the bad family relationships of public figures, however, this book gave you the respctful and loving retionship that a baseball star has with his family, specifically his father. It almost makes you breathe a sigh of relief.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2005

    Limited Appeal

    Me and My Dad is Paul O¿Neill¿s tribute to his late father Chuck O¿Neill. The book takes you through Paul¿s life from playing homerun derby in his backyard as a child, to playing in the World Series as a New York Yankee. He places emphasis on his fathers influence and wisdom he shared with him through the many troubles he had in life. Throughout the book Paul tells us about his experiences and how his father could always put a positive spin on everything by relating life to baseball, or baseball to life. The book helps to give the reader a deeper and simpler look at professional athletes. While it is a must read for any Yankee or Paul O¿Neill fan, I cannot recommend it to anyone else. Even for a baseball fan like myself it has limited appeal. It is short and not very well written; some parts seem to drag on and on about nothing. Yankee fans will love it just to get a deeper understanding of one of their better players, but others will laugh at Paul¿s girlyness and grow to dislike him by the end. Because of these reasons, I can only recommend this book to Yankee fans, and possibly women who like to see the softer and more sensitive side of men.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2004

    A Fine Athlete, An Even Finer Man

    How nice to read a book about a professional athlete who has values and love of family. Greed and self-admiration are the mantra of so many of today's sports heroes, yet these flawed qualities are not what Paul O'neill is all about. Anyone who reads this book will learn about what really matters in life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2003

    GREAT!

    One of the best baseball books ever. It's one of those books that when you finish it you're sad that there isn't more. Even if you are not a yankees fan you will still love this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2003

    WOW

    I just finished this book, and if Paul O'neill was not already my favorite player he is now...the way he writes of his father and his Yankee days brought tears to my eyes. Today so much of sports talk is about money and scandal. This book gives us a glimpse into the world of baseball we don't get to see. It wonderfully portrays that the players are regular people with feelings and problems like all of us. A must read for any fan of the great American past time

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2003

    Its about Baseball

    Imagine that, a baseball book about baseball and not who is taking what drug. Very enjoyable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2003

    Paul O'neill is great

    This is an excellent read. It's ashame baseball doesn't have more people like Paul O'neill. What a great family man. A+

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2003

    A Field of His Own

    I knew Paul O'Neill as a teenager in Columbus and his book tells the story of our neighborhood in the late 70's. His love for his father and family comes through in every word of the book. He was totally honest about his 'fiery' temper and how it was driven from within. Paul was the athlete on the North Side of Columbus and all of Borrkhaven High School is proud of his achievements! It is to his credit that we have a baseball book that explains the bond between Father and Son. Through him I am able to see how and why my love for the game is true and real.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)