Me and My Family Tree

Me and My Family Tree

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by Annette Cable
     
 

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Following the successful model of Me on the Map, Sweeney demystifies an abstract concept by presenting it from a child's point of view. In Me and My Family Tree, a young girl uses simple language, her own childlike drawings, and diagrams to explain how the members of her family are related to each other and to her. Clear, colorful, detailed artwork andSee more details below

Overview

Following the successful model of Me on the Map, Sweeney demystifies an abstract concept by presenting it from a child's point of view. In Me and My Family Tree, a young girl uses simple language, her own childlike drawings, and diagrams to explain how the members of her family are related to each other and to her. Clear, colorful, detailed artwork and a fill-in family tree in the back help make the parts of the family—from
siblings to grandparents to cousins—
understandable to very young readers.

Editorial Reviews

Maeve Visser Knoth
This very simple introduction to family trees follows a little girl as she draws pictures of her family, arranges them on a tree, and explains their relationships to one another. One aunt is part of an interracial family, and a grandfather is in a wheelchair. The illustrations are clear and colorful, and the final page has a sample family tree for readers to use or copy.
The Horn Book Guide
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 3A little girl draws a picture of her family tree, adding her brother, parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins as she repeats the phrase, Theyre all part of my family tree. After she completes the project, she asks, can you guess how I came to be? and explains that her grandparents had her mother and aunt, and that her mother and father had her brother and then her. Despite its simple text, this book fails to make the concept clear. The term family tree is not explained, so children never fully understand why the narrator is sticking pictures of her family onto her drawing of a tree. A sudden statement near the end of the book, Think of it! Everyone in the world has a family tree, seems to come out of the blue. Run-of-the-mill illustrations include scenes of relatives engaged in daily activities and pictures that represent the childs drawings of her family tree. One appealing double-page spread of the entire clan at a picnic in a park features a large tree that is sure to make confused young readers ask, Is that the family tree? A disappointing attempt at introductory genealogy.Ginny Gustin, Santa Monica Public Library, CA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Me And My Family Tree (32 pp.; PLB May; 0-517-70966-X; PLB 0-517-70967-8): For children who are naturally curious about the people who care for them (most make inquiries into family relationships at an early age), Sweeney explains, with the assistance of a young narrator, the concept of a family tree. Photographs become understandable once the young girl learns the relationships among family members; she wonders what her own family tree will look like when she marries and has children. A larger message comes at the end of this story: not only does she have a family tree, but so does everyone in the world. Cable's drawings clearly define the process of creating a family tree; she provides a blank tree so children can start on their own geneaology.(Picture book. 5-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517709665
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
05/18/1999
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.22(w) x 9.22(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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