Me and the Measure of Things

Me and the Measure of Things

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by Joan Sweeney, Annette Cable
     
 

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The energetic narrator of Me Counting Time and Me on the Map is back, this time introducing young readers to the units of measure. What’s the difference between a cup and an ounce? What gets measured in bushels and when do you use a scale? Easy-to-understand text and playful corresponding illustrations teach children the differences between wet

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Overview

The energetic narrator of Me Counting Time and Me on the Map is back, this time introducing young readers to the units of measure. What’s the difference between a cup and an ounce? What gets measured in bushels and when do you use a scale? Easy-to-understand text and playful corresponding illustrations teach children the differences between wet and dry measurements, weight, size, and length. And all information is conveyed in a unique kid’s-eye perspective, using everyday objects and situations. Me and the Measure of Things makes measurement fun–and comprehensible!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
When you want to find the size of something, figure it out with weights and measures, says the young protagonist. She makes pancake batter by using certain measuring tools, depending on whether the ingredient to be measured is wet or dry. She explains how many cups make a pint and how many pints make a quart using an understandable example of orange juice for the family breakfast. All of the common measuring units in the English system are presented (no metrics here) and the examples really are kid friendly. This is a really useful book for home and school, especially for all of those adults who have forgotten how many quarts in a peck and pecks to a bushel. 2001, Crown/Random House, $12.95. Ages 6 to 9. Reviewer:Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 1-3-In an unusually thorough fashion for this audience, Sweeney defines the various units of measurement. A young girl prepares breakfast using teaspoons, tablespoons, cups, and liquid measurements such as pints and quarts. Each unit is defined in relation to the other and Cable's detailed drawings serve as visual references. The crayon illustrations include both pictorial and numeric references. From the "1 quart (32 ounces)" label on a milk carton to the "2,000 pounds=1 ton" note next to a 1-ton bag of gummy bears, the pictures effectively reinforce the concepts presented. That said, the artist's childlike illustrations are not particularly attractive and the young narrator's disproportionately large eyes are a bit disturbing. The text itself is written clearly and in a conversational manner. However, the number of concepts introduced may be a little overwhelming for children to process in a single read.-Louie Lahana, New York City Public Schools Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440417569
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
09/28/2002
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
250,130
Product dimensions:
8.80(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.10(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

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